Illustrated on this page is a selection of the standard-gauge locomotives and rolling stock owned by the Norwegian Railway Museum. Not all of the collection is on display, and some is retained for use on special trains.

This includes 2-4-0 locomotive No.17 of Type 2a, which was built by Robert Stephenson in 1861. A similar 2-4-0 locomotive of the same class - No.16 - is on display inside the main museum building, and a photograph of it can be found on another page of this website.

Another locomotive which is on display is a 2-8-4 tender locomotive of Type 49c with four cylinders, and with a service weight of 153 tonnes. It is a big locomotive displayed in a very confined area, and photograhing it was more of a challenge than I wished to face at the end of a busy day!

Frank Stamford

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0-6-0T locomotive Type 25a was built in 1911 by Hamar Jernstøberi & Mek. Værksted. Twenty-two locomotives of this type were built, plus another 42 of the similar Type 25. They were built for shunting, and were closely based on a Swiss design. No.227 spent most of its life shunting at Hamar until taken out of service in 1970, and was the last of the class to be withdrawn.

2-6-2T locomotive Type 32a No.288. It was built in 1915 by Hamar Jernstøberi & Mek. Værksted. Seven locomotives of this type were built, plus many other variations. They were built for banking service on mountainous main lines, and were the only Norwegian tank locomotive designed for fast trains. The maximum permitted speed was 75 km/h. They were also used in heavy shunting service. No.288 was taken out of service in 1969, its final task being snow clearing in the Oslo area.

4-6-0 locomotive No.234 of Type 27a. This was built by Thunes mek. Værksted in 1912. The driving wheels were 1,600mm diameter, and the cylinder diameter and stroke was 450mm and 600mm. The total weight in service was 72 tonnes, and maximum permitted speed was 75 km/h. Sixteen of this class were built, plus 17 of the similar Type 27. They had light axle-loading and so were used on railways with light rails. In later years they were used in the Hamar and Trondheim areas and on the Røros railway after it had been converted to standard gauge. No.234 was the last to be withdrawn, in 1969.

4-8-0 locomotive No.452 of Type 31b. This was built by Thunes mek. Værksted in 1926. The driving wheels are 1,350mm diameter. It has four cylinders, and the cylinder diameter and stroke is 420mm and 630mm. The total weight in service was 123 tonnes, and maximum permitted speed was 70 km/h. Twenty-three of this class were built, plus 27 of the similar Type 31. They had the relatively heavy axle loading (for Norway) of 14 tonnes, and were designed for use on the difficult and mountainous Bergen line. In later years they were also used in the Trondheim and Hamar areas. No.452 was withdrawn in 1969.

B' B' electric locomotive No.2011 Type El 1. This was built by Thunes/Per Kure in 1922. It is 15,000 volt AC at 16-2/3 Hz and has two 470 hp motors. The maximum permitted speed was 70 km/h. Twenty-four of this type were built between 1922 and 1930. They were built for the Drammen railway electrification, but proved to be very successful machines, and were eventually found on all the electrified routes between Oslo and Stavanger.

A most unusual standard-gauge track inspection vehicle. It appears to be pedal-powered.

This is a 1911 Armstrong Whitworth car, converted to a standard-gauge rail inspection vehicle by the Norwegian State Railways (NSB) in 1924 and taken out of service in the 1940s. Surviving Armstrong Whitworth cars are apparently quite rare, there may be only about ten in existence, including at least one in Australia (at Bendigo I think). !

References and further information:

Norwegian Railway Museum - collections - rolling stock


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All photographs Copyright Frank Stamford, 2010, who may be contacted by email at: frank.stamford@bigpond.com

Last updated: 28 December 2010