Artist
Artist

Gallery
Gallery

Public Art
Public Art

Exhibitions
Exhibitions

Reviews
Reviews

'Reconnaissance'
Reconnaissance

'Ichor'
Ichor

'Poisoned Well'
'The Poisoned Well'

'green line'
'green line'

'Unpromised Land'
'Unpromised Land'

Retablos
Retablos

p i p   mc m a n u s
Explore 'The Poisoned Well' Watershed Explore 'green line' Tour 'That further shore' Porcelain hands Explore 'Ichor'


Alice Springs based ceramic artist Pip McManus uses both universal human symbols and images taken directly from nature to explore issues of identity and survival in a world of destruction and dispossession.

  • Watershed:
    (Touring with Object Gallery)
    'In a contemporary, technology obsessed world perceived through the lens of lightning edits and media grabs, the natural rhythms of organic systems are often pushed to the verge of collapse before we are willing to take notice.'
  • Reconnaissance:
    'I was never given a story as a child to explain the absence of a father. It was a taboo subject... not so long ago my father’s flying log book came into my hands. Reading it was both revealing and sobering. He flew Catalina flying boats out of Darwin throughout the Pacific region in the final stages of WWII. As it turns out, the most intense entries all relate to sorties in and around the Philippines...'


  • 'Ichor [The ethereal fluid flowing in the veins of the gods, but poisonous to mortals]'
    (winner of 35th Alice Prize 2008):
    'Pip McManus’ Ichor video is mesmerising. A golden unfired clay figure, enlarged on-screen, very slowly disintegrates in water. Every nuance and escaping air bubble draws the viewer’s entranced attention. The gently dissolving figure is suggestive. It embraces an acceptance of natural processes, of the inevitable organic cycle of change. It suggests mortality and fragility as well as meditative contemplation. Loss and enrichment, ancient and contemporary life are all inferred.'
    (From 'When Ceramics Meets Video', review article by Julia Jones.)




  • 'The Poisoned Well' documents a century of genocide with 100 glazed hands bearing individual plant impressions plus accompanying text.

  • 'green line' traces the "invisible line, as clear as day" which divides the Jewish and Arab cities of Jerusalem.

  • 'Unpromised Land' reflects on the links between two tragic zionist narratives.

  • The Retablos in 'Hotline to Heaven' celebrate suburban tales of miraculous intercession.

  • In 2007 Pip McManus was the recipient of the inaugural Declan Apuatimi/J Bird Public Art Fellowship awarded by the Northern Territory Government.


Copyright © 2001-2012 Pip McManus

This site constructed by Russell Goldflam.    Last revised March 2012