Indigenous 
Science 
Network 
Bulletin

October 2009
(Volume 12, Number 5)
ISSN  1449-2091

Editor:
Michael Michie

Tiwi designs by Jennifer Coombs
Munupi Arts & Crafts Association,
Pirlangimpi, Melville Island, NT

Indigenous Science Links


NEWS and VIEWS

RESOURCES

CONFERENCES

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

NEWS and VIEWS

Science Textbooks that Combine Indigenous Knowledge and Eurocentric Science

Glen Aikenhead

University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada


To ameliorate culture clashes in school science for Indigenous students, and at the same time, to enhance the quality of school science for non-Indigenous students, the science curriculum in the Province of Saskatchewan, Canada, was changed in 2008-2009, beginning with Grades 6 and 7. Saskatchewan’s curriculum renewal occurred in consultation with a committee of stakeholders in science education, in conjunction with Indigenous Elders representing the various nations of Indigenous peoples in Saskatchewan, and in concert with pilot projects with selected teachers.

Indigenous knowledge content was introduced in ways that relate to a science topic. For example, the Indigenous presupposition that everything in the universe is interrelated and therefore has living Spirit is introduced in life science units when the scientific concepts of living and non-living are taught. The two knowledge systems are then contrasted (e.g., a holistic monist unity compared with a reductionist dualist dichotomy, respectively). Another example tells of the tragic social disruptions to Indigenous communities caused by some hydro-electric dams in Saskatchewan; stories introduced when scientific concepts of electricity are taught  Curriculum documents respect the integrity of Indigenous knowledge as being different from, and complementary to, Eurocentric science. The knowledge systems have similarities, differences, strengths, and limitations. Validation of one knowledge system by the other is avoided, but similarities between the two are emphasized.

Science textbooks have been written to support teachers’ enactment of this enhanced (cross-cultural) curriculum (Grades 6 & 7 now, Grade 8 in 2010). Elders were employed by the textbook publisher (Pearson Education of Canada) to explain Indigenous knowledge to the teacher-authors before they began writing. Some Elders were later interviewed about topics associated with specific themes found in the textbook units. (Four Eurocentric science units comprise each grade level, and one Elder was interviewed for each unit.) The interviews were summarized to suite the grade level and appeared in a section entitled “Ask an Elder.” An Elder’s ideas were reinforced by integrating them throughout the textbook where appropriate, always making clear that their ideas were complementary to the scientific ideas. The teacher-authors also conducted their own research into Indigenous knowledge related a Eurocentric science topic. Some relied on the internet while others enlisted the help of local Indigenous knowledge keepers. Before the textbook manuscripts were considered ready for editing by the publisher, they were vetted by the Elders in a day-long face-to-face discussion with the authors and publisher, on two separate occasions.

The textbooks are:

Johanson, R, Mohr, P., Treptau, C., Wallace, C., & View, T. (2009). Saskatchewan Science 6. Toronto: Pearson Education Canada.

Brockman, A., Doepker, C., Stephenson, E., Wallace, M., & View, T. (2009). Saskatchewan Science 7. Toronto: Pearson Education Canada.

and are available from:

http://www.pearsonschoolcatalogue.ca/program_multiple.cfm?site_id=2621&program_id=65881&searchType=All&searchTerm=saskatchewan%20science
(It appears that the textbooks are not available outside Canada if ordered from this site.)


Going back to Lajamanu

During September this year, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation broadcast a report titled "Going back to Lajamanu" as part of their 4 Corners program. It examined bilingual education in the Northern Territory which has been undergoing government-mandated changes. The report and some other video and print material can be seen at http://www.abc.net.au/4corners/special_eds/20090914/language/ 

Because of copyright restrictions, some of the material may not be available to viewers outside Australia.


 


RESOURCES


EURASIA Journal of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education

A special issue of the EURASIA Journal has been edited by professors Annette Gough and Dianne Siemon of the RMIT University. I would like to thank them for all the hard work through the months. I also wish to extend my sincere thanks to all of the contributors. This issue features three conversations with Annette Gough, Ken Tobin, and Dick Gunstone. Following those there are eight research articles and a book review.


Please visit www.ejmste.com to view and download past and current issues and articles free!

IHPST Newsletter

The August IHPST newsletter is available on the web at http://www.ihpst.org/newsletters.html. Its Contents are:

1.    President’s Column

2.    Notre Dame Conference Report

3.    Science & Education Latest Number (Vol.18 No.8)

4.    Science & Education Journal Report

5.    Journal and Newsletter Book Review Editors and Reviewers Required

6.    Journal Special Issue: Pseudoscience in Society and Classroom

7.    Anthology: Science, Worldviews and Education

8.    University of Patras Web Journal

9.    HPS&ST and NOS Course Outlines and Materials

10.   Teaching Evolution: Theoretical and Pedagogical Issues, GEITONAS School, Athens, 7-8 November 2009

11.   Nordic Symposium on HPS & Science Teaching, October 28-30, 2009

12.   First Latin American IHPST Regional Conference, 19-21 August, 2010

13.   NARST Conference, Strand 13, 20-24 March 2010

14.   Twenty-Second Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association, November 4-6, 2010, Montreal, Quebec

15.   Opinion

16.   Book Notes: Matt Young and Paul K Strode, Why Evolution Works (and Creationism Fails) reviewed by Kostas Kampourakis.

17.   Current Research

18.   Publications for Sale

19.   Coming Conferences

20.   Journal Numbers for 2009

21.   IHPST Executive

22.   IHPST Graduate Students

23.   IHPST Email List

24.   Newsletter Items


The September newsletter of the IHPST group is now available on the web at http://www.ihpst.org/newsletters.html  Its Contents are:

1.    President’s Column

2.    Science & Education Latest Number (Vol.18 No.9)

3.    Science & Education Journal Report

4.    Book Review Editors Appointed, and Reviewers Required

5.    Journal Special Issue: Pseudoscience in Society and School

6.    Conference: Objectivity in Science, June 17-20, 2010, University of British Columbia

7.    The Story Behind the Science: Bringing Science and Scientists to Life

8.    History of Science Society, Phoenix Conference, 19-22 November

9.    HPS&ST and NOS Course Outlines and Materials

10.   Teaching Evolution: Theoretical and Pedagogical Issues, GEITONAS School, Athens, 7-8 November 2009

11.   Nordic Symposium on HPS & Science Teaching, October 28-30, 2009

12.   First Latin American IHPST Regional Conference, 19-21 August, 2010

13.   NARST Conference, Strand 13, 20-24 March 2010

14.   Twenty-Second Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association, November 4-6, 2010, Montreal, Quebec

15.   Opinion

16.   Book Review: Alan Chalmers, The Scientist’s Atom and the Philosopher’s Stone,

17.   Current Research

18.   Publications for Sale

19.   Coming Conferences

20.   Journal Numbers for 2009

21.   IHPST Executive

22.   IHPST Graduate Students

23.   IHPST Email List

24.   Newsletter Items


International Journal of Environmental & Science Education

The new issue of International Journal of Environmental & Science Education has now been released and you may access all journal content freely from the web site: http://www.ijese.com/currentissue.htm
 
The World of Science Education

This is a series of handbooks on science education research, edited by Ken Tobin and Wolff-Michael Roth and published by Sense Publishers, creating an international picture of science education research. An article  on indigenous science education has appeared in each of the handbooks which have been published, on North America and Australasia.

Carol B. Brandt & Karl Kosko. (2009). The Power of the Earth is a Circle: Indigenous Science Education in North America. In W.-M. Roth & K. Tobin (Eds.), The world of science education: Handbook of research in North America (pp.389-408). Rotterdam and Taipai: Sense Publishers. (For a free copy of this article, courtesy of Sense Publishers, click on Brandt and Kosko )

Elizabeth McKinley and Georgina Stewart. (2009). Falling into Place. Indigenous Science Education Research in the Pacific. In S.M. Ritchie (Ed.), The world of science education: Handbook of research in Australasia (pp.49-68). Rotterdam and Taipai: Sense Publishers. (For a free copy of this article, courtesy of Sense Publishers, click on McKinley and Stewart )
Editor's comment (p.3): "Indigenous children have typically not performed well on school-based and international tests such as PISA. Some attempts to redesign the curriculum have had mixed success. Yet, simply infusing the science curriculum with Indigenous Knowledge (IK) without addressing at a philosophical level that IK and Western science are different ways of knowing, seems counterproductive. Elizabeth McKinley and Georgina Stewart forecast further research will be directed by Indigenous communities, possibly in partnership with science education researchers."

Readers can get a 20% discount if they would like to order the book(s), for more information they can contact Michel Lokhorst (michel.lokhorst@sensepublishers.com).

 I would like to thank Sense Publishers and particularly Michel Lokhorst for making these articles available.


Other resources

Hewson MG, Javu MT, Holtman LB. (2009). The role of African traditional health practitioners in implementing indigenous knowledge in the South African science curriculum. African Journal of Research in Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education, 13(2).


Abstract: South Africa’s new and revised National Curriculum Statement explicitly requires the integration of indigenous knowledge systems into the science curriculum so that learners can learn within the context of their cultural knowledge. Unfortunately teachers do not necessarily know the various indigenous knowledge systems within South Africa. We therefore decided to identify the ideas of traditional health practitioners (THPs) and obtain science teachers’ responses to these ideas. Using a qualitative approach we conducted in-depth interviews with 7 THPs, with a follow-up questionnaire plus discussion with 27 THPs. According to THPs: all learners need to know about, and respect their heritages, especially African; learners must be taught the utility of the animate and inanimate world to humans (e.g., for healing, nutrition); they must appreciate the inter-dependence of humans with the animate and inanimate world; they must be taught about healthy lifestyles especially concerning sexuality. The THPs believe that they can and should co-teach this indigenous knowledge with science teachers.

They prefer to use fieldwork, demonstrations, discussions, stories, cases, and videotapes rather than lectures. The THPs believe that both science and traditional African healing are important in the education of learners, and that science teachers and THPs can, and should work collaboratively. We then shared the THPs’ ideas with both expert science educators and Senior Phase (Grades 7-9) science teachers. Both groups were interested in, and strongly supportive of the THP suggestions. They also emphasized that indigenous knowledge concerning health and healing should be accredited by an indigenous organization.

Key Words: Indigenous knowledge, South Africa, traditional healers, science education, qualitative research, integrated IKS-science program

Mariana G. Hewson1, Mirranda T. Javu2, Lorna B. Holtman3 1. Visiting Professor, School of Science and Mathematics Education, University of the Western Cape, 2. President, Indibano Association of Traditional Healers, 3. Biodiversity and Conservation Biology Department, University of the Western Cape, South Africa.

hewsonm@mailworks.org


Emu Dreaming

Ray and Cilla Norris have published a book, Emu Dreaming, giving a short and easy-to-read introduction to Aboriginal Astronomy. Ray Norris is an astrophysicist with CSIRO, and an Adjunct Professor at the Dept. of Indigenous Studies, Macquarie University. The book is available on
www.emudreaming.com

"The First Astronomers"

As part of the Darwin Festival, Ray Norris and Bill Harney presented "The first astronomers", a look at Norris's scientific astronomy and Harney's traditional Wardaman astronomy. There were two performances in Darwin, held outside with ready reference to the night sky. There had been an earlier performance in Katherine.

There was also a workshop held beforehand. The ABC Artworks program about the show with Bill Harney, Jo Duffy, Alex Galeazzi and Ray Norris, including the chat in the NT library, went to air last week on 20 September and is also available on
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2009/09/aks_20090920.mp3 (you have to fast forward 32 minutes through the mp3 file to reach "The First Astronomers").


Charles Darwin Symposium 2009, Darwin (Australia)

As part of the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth and the 150th anniversary of the publication of The origin of species, Charles Darwin University in Darwin held a symposium looking at the impact of Darwin's work. The theme of the symposium was Charles Darwin: Shaping our science, society & future. you can hear many of the presentations by visiting the CDU website at http://www.cdu.edu.au/enews/versions/092209symp.html

There may be particular interest in two presentations relating to the theme, Social Darwinism and indigenous nations: The origin of socio-political policy. These presentaions were by two Indigenous scholars, Dr Lester-Irabinna Rigney and Dr Maggie Walter. They can also be heard by visiting the website and scrolling down to the bottom.


CONFERENCES

INDIGENOUS STUDIES, INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE CONFERENCE (ISIK) 2009: Dialogue or Conflict in the Academy?
30 November - 1 December 2009
The University of Notre Dame, Mouat Street, Fremantle

The 2009 ISIK Conference is the fourth in an annual series for scholars and researchers in the fields of Indigenous Studies/Knowledge to get together, discuss and share developments. The theme of this year’s conference is Indigenous Studies, Indigenous Knowledge: Dialogue or Conflict in the Academy? It is hosted by the School of Indigenous Studies at the University of Western Australia and the University of Notre Dame, in historic Fremantle, WA, on 30 November and 1 December 2009.

Our keynote international presenters – scholars Nancy C. Maryboy and David Begay from the United States – are involved in some amazing work at the boundaries of traditional Native American/ Indigenous and western science. This includes initiatives such as the Cosmic Serpent project (http://cosmicserpent.org/) and NASA’s Stargazer program (http://www.spacegrant.nau.edu/stargazer/ ) to promote Indigenous astronomy and scientific knowledge. To celebrate the International Year of Astronomy, our guests will be sharing their experiences and expanding our minds.

Some outstanding Australian presenters have also confirmed, including celebrated Aboriginal author and artist, Professor Sally Morgan of the Centre for Indigenous History and the Arts at The University of Western Australia. Sally will be doing a writing workshop as part of the Stories and Storytelling session. It will be a fun, free ranging discussion for anyone interested in creative writing or writing their own or their family’s life story.

Other national presenters include:
Dr Pat Dudgeon – Healing People, Healing Country
Professor Martin Nakata – Indigenous Knowledge and Western Science
Professor Lynn Henderson-Yates – Indigenous Studies: Implementation in the Academy
Mr Steve Kinnane – Healing People, Healing Country

Conference Registration
Registration forms and further information is available on the website – www.isik.org.au

Call for Papers
The conference is seeking papers by Indigenous people on any of the conference themes. Non-Indigenous people are invited to co-present with an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander. Please email jneri@sis.uwa.edu.au or telephone Joy Neri on 08 6488 2001. Deadline for receipt of abstracts is 31 August.

SEVENTEENTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON LEARNING     

Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong    

6-9 July 2010     

http://www.LearningConference.com     

The International Conference on Learning is for anyone with an interest in, and concern for, education at any of its levels and in any of its forms, from early childhood, to schools, to higher education and lifelong learning - and in any of its sites, from home to school to university to workplace.

In present-day Hong Kong, traditional Chinese practices are met with a Westerly modern way of life. In similar fashion, education, too, has developed under this analogous balancing act, having integrated a western-style education model with a Colonial Hong Kong school system of education by the mid-nineteenth century. The Hong Kong Institute of Education, in the same vein, brings teacher education into the 20th and 21st centuries - the result of merging the five former Colleges of Education in 1994.

Learning Conference plenary speakers include:     

Katerine Bielaczyc, National Institute of Education, Singapore     

Yasmin B. Kafai, Journal of the Learning Sciences     

Kerry Kennedy, Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong     

Samuel Leong, Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong     

Bob Lingard, The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia     

The Conference will also include numerous paper, workshop and colloquium presentations by practitioners, teachers and researchers. We would particularly like to invite you to respond to the Conference Call-for-Papers. Presenters may choose to submit written papers for publication in The International Journal of Learning. If you are unable to attend the Conference in person, virtual registrations are also available which allow you to submit a paper for refereeing and possible publication.

Whether you are a virtual or in-person presenter at this Conference, we also encourage you to present on the Conference YouTube Channel. Please select the Online Sessions link on the Conference website for further details.

The deadline for the next round in the call for papers (a title and short abstract) is 17 September 2009. Future deadlines will be announced on the Conference website after this date.  Proposals are reviewed within two weeks of submission. Full details of the Conference, including an online proposal submission form, are to be found at the Conference website - http://www.LearningConference.com/.

TENTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON DIVERSITY IN ORGANISATIONS, COMMUNITIES AND NATIONS     

Queen's University Belfast, Northern Ireland     

19-21 July 2010       

http://www.Diversity-Conference.com

The Diversity Conference has a history of bringing together scholarly, government and practice-based participants with an interest in the issues of diversity and community. The Conference examines the concept of diversity as a positive aspect of a global world and globalised society. Diversity is in many ways reflective of our present world order, but there are ways of taking this further without necessary engendering its alternatives: racism, conflict, discrimination and inequity. Diversity as a mode of social existence can be projected in ways that deepen the range of human experience. The Conference will seek to explore the full range of what diversity means and explore modes of diversity in real-life situations of living together in community. The Conference supports a move away from simple affirmations that 'diversity is good' to a much more nuanced account of the effects and uses of diversity on differently situated communities in the context of our current epoch of globalisation.

The tenth anniversary of the Diversity Conference will be marked in Belfast, a city both with a past marked by sectarian conflict and a rich heritage of diversity. In addition, ethnic minority communities have increased in number and size since the expansion of the European Union. Belfast, like many cities, continues to work to overcome old divisions.

As well as impressive line-up of international plenary speakers, the Conference will also include numerous paper, workshop and colloquium presentations by practitioners, teachers and researchers. We would particularly like to invite you to respond to the Conference Call-for-Papers. Presenters may choose to submit written papers for publication in The International Journal of Diversity in Organisations, Communities and Nations. If you are unable to attend the Conference in person, virtual registrations are also available which allow you to submit a paper for refereeing and possible publication.

Whether you are a virtual or in-person presenter at this Conference, we also encourage you to present on the Conference YouTube Channel. Please select the Online Sessions link on the Conference website for further details.

The deadline for the next round in the call for papers (a title and short abstract) is 8 October 2009. Future deadlines will be announced on the Conference website after this date.  Proposals are reviewed within two weeks of submission. Full details of the Conference, including an online proposal submission form, are to be found at the Conference website - http://www.Diversity-Conference.com/.

 





CALENDAR OF EVENTS

This is mostly a summary of upcoming conferences. More details may have been given in this or previous bulletins as shown. A web-based contact is usually included. Inclusion of conferences in this list is not to be read as an endorsement of the conference.

2009

October 2009

1-2 October: UniServe Science Annual Conference, University of Sydney http://science.uniserve.edu.au/workshop/conference.html (April09)

17-18 October: 2009 AURA Inter-Congress Symposium, Broken Hill http://mc2.vicnet.net.au/home/aura/web/index.html (Aug09) 


21-23 October: 1st East Asian Association for Science Education, "Science Education for Tomorrow: Voices of East Asia", Taiwan. http://esciedu.nctu.edu.tw/ease/index.php (Dec09)


November 2009

1-3 November: ICASE Asian Symposium XI, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin, P.R.China www.risechina.org (April09)

10-12 November:
Third International Conference on Science and Mathematics Education (CoSMEd) 
2009. RECSAM, Penang http://www.recsam.edu.my/cosmed/index.html (Feb09)

24-26 November: 2nd International Science Education Conference (ISEC 2009) Science Education: Shared Issues, Common Future National Institute of Education, Singapore. http://www.nsse.nie.edu.sg/isec2009. (April09)

24-27 November: ANZCIES 2009 Entering the Age of an Educational Renaissance: Ideas for unity of purpose or further discord? University of New England, Armidale, NSW (Australia) http://www.anzcies.org/ (Jun09)


30 November - 1 December: Indigenous Studies, Indigenous Knowledge Conference (ISIK) 2009: Dialogue or Conflict in the Academy? The University of Notre Dame, Mouat Street, Fremantle www.isik.org.au (Oct09)


2010

January 2010

5-7 January: Sixth International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability, University of Cuenca, Ecuador http://www.SustainabilityConference.com (Jun09)

7-10 January: 8th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Education,Waikiki Beach Marriott Resort & Spa / Hilton Waikiki Prince Kuhio Hotel Honolulu http://www.hiceducation.org  (Jun09)

9-11 January: Third World Universities Forum, Davos, Switzerland 
http://universitiesforum.com (April09)

March 2010

20-24 March: National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) annual conference, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA http://www.narst.org/annualconference/2010conference.cfm  (Aug09)

June 2010

21-23 June: Global Studies Conference, Pusan National University, Busan, South Korea http://www.GlobalStudiesConference.com (Aug09)

28 June - 2 July: ICASE World Conference 2010, Tartu, Estonia
http://www.worldste2010.ut.ee/ (Oct08)

29 June - 2 July: Eighth International Conference on New Directions in the Humanities, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), USA. http://www.HumanitiesConference.com/ (Aug10)

30 June - 3 July: Australasian Science Education Research Association (ASERA), sponsored by University of Newcastle (NSW). Venue: Shoal Bay Resort, Port Stephens (north of Newcastle) http://asera.org.au/

July 2010

6-9 July: Seventeenth International Conference on Learning, Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong http://www.LearningConference.com  (Oct09) 

19-21 July: Tenth International Conference on Diversity in Organisations, Communities and Nations, Queen's University Belfast, Northern Ireland http://www.Diversity-Conference.com (Oct09)

2011

April 2011

2-6 April: National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) annual conference, Orlando FA, USA

2012

March 2012

24-28 March: National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) annual conference, Indianapolis IN, USA


Last updated: 1 October 2009

 

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