Not Your Usual Sources: a book you can buy two ways

sourcescover (74K)

These books are now all available as Kindle e-books. Click on these links to take a look: these will be progressively added over the next couple of days, as the books are uploaded. Not Your Usual Sources, which is all of the next three combined;
Not Your Usual Anthology of Verse
Not Your Usual Science Quotations
Not Your Usual Australian Vignettes

(Hint: try the 'Look Inside' feature.)

versecover (27K) The first item is a collection of resources for writers and teachers and other curious minds. It is packaged two ways: once as an omnibus, called Not Your Usual Sources, and then as a set of three collections. The content is the same, but I have arranged the price structure to make the omnibus more attractive.

The first part of the omibus is verse like this, and you can also get it as a separate volume, as indicated on the left. This collection is bigger than the Norton Anthology, and it is all copyright-free.

There's a very funny insect that you do not often spy,
And it isn't quite a spider, and it isn't quite a fly;
It is something like a beetle, and a little like a bee,
But nothing like a woolly grub that climbs upon a tree.
Its name is quite a hard one, but you'll learn it soon, I hope.
So, try:

Tri-
Tri-anti-wonti-
Triantiwontigongolope.


The second offers a wide range of quotations from the great scientists, philosophers and writers about science. sciencequotescover (35K)
"Many right skilful masters in chirurgery, and the best learned anatomists, are of the opinion that the veins of the eyes reach to the brain. For mine own part, I would rather think that they pass into the stomach. This is certain, I never knew a man's eye plucked out of his head, but he fell to vomiting upon it, and the stomach cast up all within it."
- Gaius Plinius Secundus (23-79) The Natural History, translated by Philemon Holland, 132.
Or try this one for size: the discovery that led to the photocopier:
On the 12th February, 1873, the Society of Telegraph Engineers received a communication from one of its members (Mr. Willoughby Smith) to the effect that a stick of crystalline selenium, such as has been used for some time in telegraphy where electrical resistances were required, offered considerably less resistance to a battery current when exposed to light than when kept in the dark In approaching the sensitive selenium plate with a dark hot poker, no sensible effect is produced, whereas the same hot poker when brought near a Crookes' radiometer causes it to revolve with great energy, showing that the latter instrument is much more dependent upon heat rays than selenium.
- Sir William Siemens (1823 - 1883), The Action of Light on Selenium, address to the Royal Institution, February 18, 1876.


vignettescover (31K) The third part involves short grabs of Australian history
Mary-Ann Grenaine was charged by Sergeant Toole with drunkenness and disorderly conduct in York-street, on Friday morning. The prisoner, a little undersized, pug-nosed creature, about sixteen years of age, appeared at the bar, dressed in male attire, not exactly the 'bloomer' costume, at present creating such a sensation in Philadelp[h]ia, but arrayed in blue jacket and trowsers, with a neat little oilskin hat upon her head. The sergeant deposed that he found the prisoner drunk outside Mr. Entwistle's Hotel, in York-street. She was dancing the sailor's hornpipe to the great enjoyment of the mob.
- Empire (Sydney), 17 November 1851, 4.

At daylight I arose and took a walk through the town; - the intended principal street of which, named St George's Terrace, - where the future beaux and belles of Western Australia may, in after times, show off their reciprocal attractive charms - was, at present, only adorned with lofty trees, and a variety of lovely flowers.

In my perambulations, I fell in with the written newspaper of the place, appended to a stately eucalyptus tree, where, among other public notices, I observed the Governor's permission for one individual to practise as a notary, another as a surgeon, and a third as an auctioneer.

There did not appear to be an opposition tree, and so much the better; as, although a free press may do good to a community arrived at a certain state of perfection, yet I think it may be doubted how far it can be serviceable in an incipient colony, where private affairs are narrowly noticed, and animadverted on: hence spring jealousies, ill feeling, and their numerous train of disagreeable attendants.
- T. B. Wilson, Narrative of a Voyage Round the World. London: Sherwood, Gilbert and Piper, 1835, London: Dawson's of Pall Mall, 1968, pages 188-189.

ISBN TBA, written by Peter Macinnis, now published as a Kindle e-book.

I hope you will have a great deal more fun from this book. I certainly had fun writing it.

This file is http://members.ozemail.com.au/~macinnis/writing/sources.htm

It was created on April 27, 2017 and last updated April 28, 2017.

If you email me at macinnis at ozemail.com.au, you will reach a spam trap, but be read, eventually, probably maybe. If you put my first name in front of that address (so it reads petermacinnis), you will reach me much faster and more surely. This low-tech solution is to make email harvesting difficult. I am generally willing to talk to interesting humans. Spammers miss out twice on fitting that specification.

email400 (18K)

The home page of this set is here.