dinkus4 (15K)The footnote links for Not Your Usual Bushrangersdinkus1 (9K)

This collection won't be completely useful unless you have a copy of the book they come from.

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Section
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Link
10The very first bushrangersYesterday a bench of magistrates...charged with having employed John Campbell, a bush rangerThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Sunday 29 March 1807, 2
11Black Caesar[Black Caesar] could in any one day devour the full ration for two daysDownload or read text here, and search for phrase: David Collins, An Account of the English Colony in New South Wales, volume I, ch. VII, p. 58
12Black CaesarOn Monday the 15th...Black Caesar had that morning been shot by one WimbowDownload or read text here, and search for phrase: David Collins, An Account of the English Colony in New South Wales, volume I, chapter XXX, p. 381 in the print edition.
16Being a convictIn 1806, this format for a ticket-of-leave was published…The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Sunday 23 March 1806, 1
16Being a convictOUTLINE OF AN ARRANGEMENT FOR GRANTING TICKETS OF LEAVEThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Wednesday 8 November 1826, 2
18Losing your ticket-of-leaveOn 1 April, 1841, the Tickets-of-Leave granted to 30 convicts were cancelled for various reasons.The Sydney Herald, Saturday 24 April 1841, 3
19Being a convict...which Certificates must express their considering the Applicants sober, industrious, and honestThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 9 January 1813, 1
21The punishment of bushrangersIn about 1824, a convict...found a gold nuggetThe Sydney Morning Herald, Tuesday 20 May 1851, 3
22Bushranging boltersThomas Shirley and another prisoner...were ordered 200 lashesThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Sunday 29 March 1807, 2
25William Page...there was a reward of £3 sterling on offer to anybody delivering William Page, to the County GaolThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Sunday 30 March 1806, 4
26William Page…tendered a voluntary confession of his crimes committed during his last absence, and was lodged in gaolThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Sunday 4 May 1806, 1
28William Page...the cutlass wielder won, after giving Page a nasty head woundThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Sunday 1 June 1806, 2
29John FitzgeraldJohn Fitzgerald...along with John Taylor had been ordered to receive corporal punishment (a flogging)The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Sunday 11 December 1803, 4
29John FitzgeraldThe Hobart Town Courier told a tale concerning Governor King and the ship's bell on board the Lady NelsonThe Courier (Hobart), Wednesday 29 July 1857, 3
30John FitzgeraldThe magistrate ordered that he receive 300 lashes, and work in ironsThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Sunday 2 February 1806, 2
31John FitzgeraldJohn Fitzgerald, a Prisoner of the Crown, and now a Runaway Bush-Ranger, [who] stands charged with divers Felonies and Misdemeanors…The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 19 November 1814, 1
31John FitzgeraldJohn Fitzgerald...accidentally drowned abreast the King's Wharf. The body has not yet been foundThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 27 September 1817, 2
32John FitzgeraldThe diving convict... sank almost immediately, and was never seen againThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 4 October 1817, 3
46The punishment of bushrangersPrivate Yems was court-martialled, found guilty and condemned to be shot.The Australian (Sydney), Thursday 24 February 1825, 3
48The punishment of bushrangersTheir execution took place at noonThe Australian (Sydney), Wednesday 18 October 1826, 3
48The punishment of bushrangersThree other bushrangers … Johnston, Jennings and Carter...would work in chains for the rest of their livesThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 14 October 1826, 1
49Moondyne Joe, the last of the boltersPhotograph of Moondyne Joe in his suit of marsupial skinsPublic domain, Wikipedia
50Moondyne Joe, the last of the boltersin July 1865 … he was charged with killing a steer called BrightThe Perth Gazette and West Australian Times, Friday 7 July 1865, 3
50Moondyne Joe, the last of the boltersA little over a year later, Joseph Johns was better known as Moondyne Joe, prison escapeeThe Perth Gazette and West Australian Times, Friday 10 August 1866, 2
50Moondyne Joe, the last of the boltersBy September, Joe and his reported companions were the suspects in a robbery involving money, food and guns, from a Mr. EverettThe Inquirer & Commercial News, Wednesday 12 September 1866, 3
50Moondyne Joe, the last of the boltersonly one of the convicts went for his gun, which caused a constable to shoot him through the arm. Joe and the other convict gave themselves upThe Inquirer & Commercial News, Wednesday 10 October 1866, 3
52Moondyne Joe, the last of the boltersHe was only wearing his flannel drawers and his boots, which might have attracted attention, but he made it safely into the bush, and in his version, he soon acquired a suit of "marsupial skins"The Inquirer & Commercial News, Wednesday 13 March 1867, 2
52Moondyne Joe, the last of the boltershis wine cellar where he found Moondyne Joe helping himself to some of the wineThe Perth Gazette and West Australian Times, Friday 5 March 1869, 2
52Moondyne Joe, the last of the boltersHe was taken back to gaol again, but Joe assured everybody that he had no intention of staying thereThe Herald (Fremantle), Saturday 27 February 1869, 2
53Moondyne Joe, the last of the boltersIn 1877, he ... was given a fine of £5, or if he didn't pay up, three months' imprisonmentThe Inquirer & Commercial News, Wednesday 16 May 1877, 5
53Moondyne Joe, the last of the boltersIn 1878, he was in court again, but this time, he was there as a victim of a robberThe Herald (Fremantle), Saturday 9 February 1878, 3
53Moondyne Joe, the last of the boltersin 1887, he was charged with the theft of a dray, two horses, and three sets of harness, but he was later cleared of the chargeThe Inquirer & Commercial News (Perth), Wednesday 30 November 1887, 6
53Moondyne Joe, the last of the boltersIn early 1888, he was tricked into cashing a forged cheque, but was found to be without blameThe Inquirer & Commercial News (Perth), Wednesday 15 February 1888, 6
53Moondyne Joe, the last of the boltersIn 1896, he was charged with possessing some iron, a plough, and a mould for making shilling coinsThe Daily News, Thursday 13 August 1896, 3
53Moondyne Joe, the last of the boltersAnother charge in 1898 was also dropped when the judge gave him the benefit of the doubtThe Daily News, Friday 17 June 1898, 3
58The real Jack DonohoeThey had held up three carts, belonging to George Plomer of Richmond, taking money and brandy. The Monitor, Thursday February 7, 1828
59The real Jack DonohoeAuthority was affronted by the way Donohoe managed to escape. They wanted him back, so they could hang himThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Friday 2 May 1828, 1
59The real Jack DonohoeThe worldly-wise governor refused to grant any reprieveThe Monitor, Wednesday March 26, 1828
61The real Jack DonohoeDuring the fighting, the bushrangers retreated uphill, and found safety as night fell, giving them coverThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Friday 19 September 1828, 2
61The real Jack Donohoesome of the bushrangers made off, though James Holmes, William Owens and Thomas Wigden were captured and sentenced to death in December of that yearThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Monday 15 December 1828
61The real Jack DonohoeDonohoe may have been wounded in the arm, but he escapedThe Sydney Monitor, Saturday 5 June 1830, 2
61The real Jack DonohoeIn September 1829, he and of William Underwood, described as "notorious bushrangers", had a price of £50 on each of their headsThe Australian (Sydney), Friday 25 September 1829, 3
62The real Jack DonohoeThus is the Colony rid of one of the most dangerous spirits that ever infested it, and happy would it be were those of a like disposition to take warning by his awful fateThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 4 September
63The real Jack DonohoeA pencil sketch of Donohoe, made in the morgue by Major (later Sir Thomas) MitchellWikimedia Commons
65Bailed up!William Strutt, Bushrangers on the St Kilda RoadWikimedia Commons
67Bailed up!the practised eye of the digger readily distinguishes the dress, air and behaviour of the regular bushrangerDownload or read text here, and search for phrase: Wathen, G. H., Golden Colony, p. 139-40
67Bailed up!bushranging was caused by…manhood suffrage and the NSW legislature pandering to the passions of the people and allowing free selection before surveyDownload or read text here, and search for phrase: A Clergyman' (John Morison), Australia: facts and Features, Sketches and Incidents of Australia and Australian Life, 1867, 228
67-8Bailed up!bushrangers tying up their first victims, then leaving them to shout for help, attracting other honest folk away from the track so they could be bailed up in their turnDownload or read text here, and search for phrase: Mrs Charles (Ellen) Clacy, A Lady's Visit to the Gold Diggings of Australia in 1852-53, ch XI
68Bailed up!Some will steal a new spring-cart from a Melbourne tradesmanDownload or read text here, and search for phrase: Wathen, G. H., Golden Colony, p. 141
69Bailed up!After searching their victim, the robbers let him go and he later found his horse (and gold) awaiting him at the innDownload or read text here, and search for phrase: Thomas M'Combie, Australian Sketches, p. 77
70How bushrangers workedHis mask had slipped when he bent over to get a light from a fire in a house they were robbingThe Australian (Sydney), Tuesday 6 January 1829, 2
70How bushrangers worked…smock frocks and masks which covered their whole heads and reached upon their shoulders…Australasian Chronicle (Sydney), Tuesday 10 November 1840, 2
70How bushrangers workedhaving their faces covered with a kind of bag answering the purpose of a maskAustralasian Chronicle (Sydney), Tuesday 2 May 1843, 2
71How bushrangers worked…with praiseworthy caution, [he] eluded their treacherous attempts to intoxicate him, by allowing the wine to run into his bosomThe Sydney Morning Herald, Monday 14 October 1844, 4
72How bushrangers workedAs well, she said that she relied on his figure, his hair, his height, and his general appearance. Taylor was found guiltyThe Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser, Saturday 14 March 1846, 2
72How bushrangers worked, they noted that one of the robbers had a mouth hole large enough to let them see his teeth, which were wide apartThe Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser, Wednesday 4 July 1849, 2
73How bushrangers workedthe bushranger ... pointed a pistol at the driver, threatening to blow out the mailman's brains if he did not immediately stop and get downThe Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser, Saturday 19 October 1850, 1
73How bushrangers workedMr. W. W. Armstrong of Rylstone was stripped of his coat and waistcoat, and they also took a silver watch, his clean linen, and … papersThe Sydney Morning Herald, Friday 8 February 1850, 2
73How bushrangers workedthe more local Bathurst Free Press knew the local gossip, and called the papers "written documents, relative to his insolvency"Bathurst Free Press, Saturday 9 February 1850, 4
74How bushrangers workedThe bags were later found intact, and the only sickness suffered by the mailman was a hangoverBathurst Free Press and Mining Journal, Saturday 8 November 1851, 4
75The art of catching villainsIt appears there are two gangs of bushrangers robbing…The Sydney Herald, Monday 21 March 1842, 2
75The art of catching villainsThey had even ...managed to visit the theatres and other public places with impunity, by reason of their being well dressed, and thus eluding the vigilance of the policeThe Sydney Herald, Tuesday 29 March 1842, 2
77The art of catching villainsWilton and Morgan ...were sentenced to be transported to a penal settlement for the term of their natural livesAustralasian Chronicle (Sydney), Thursday 31 March 1842, 2
77The art of catching villainsHowarth got his absolute pardon, though he had to wait until June 1843 for it to become officialAustralasian Chronicle (Sydney), Tuesday 13 June 1843, 4
78The art of catching villainsWe are astonished that the settlers of the southern counties do not confer some public mark of their approbation upon Doyle, whose perseverance and activity cannot but be well known to themThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Thursday 2 June 1842, 3
78The art of catching villainsa policeman went to a hut on the station to get a "light", meaning a twig, lit from the fireThe Australian (Sydney), Tuesday 11 January 1842, 2
80The art of catching villainsWe hear that Mr. Brice has since been sent for by the Chief Commissioner of Police, and been promised an appointment on account of his conduct in the capture of DaltonThe Argus (Melbourne), Monday 7 February 1853, 5
80Martin CashPlaying safe, he described the brands on the cattle, and invited possible owners to call upon himSee, for example, The Sydney Herald, Monday 26 December 1836, 3
81Martin Cashwhen Cash was caught in Harrington Street in Hobart, he was already bring described as "…that notorious bushranger…"Launceston Examiner, Saturday 7 May 1842, 5
84The Melbourne bushrangersOriginally five, they were joined by extra settlers along the way, and arrived as a party of thirty, though only the original five were armedThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 14 May 1842, 4
87The Melbourne bushrangerswe trust for humanity's sake, that on the approaching occasion, the ladder or other approach to the platform will be so constructed as to permit the men to ascend with less difficultyThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Tuesday 28 June 1842, 3
90Aborigines and bushrangersSir Watkin, the black tracker, was shot by Tommy Clarke from the window of the hutIllustrated Sydney News, 16/5/1867, 7
95The fears that gold broughtSan Francisco only contains about fifty or sixty souls, and these would leave were it possibleThe Sydney Morning Herald, Saturday 23 December 1848
95The fears that gold broughtthe Sydney Morning Herald advised farmers to stay on their farms, harvest their crops, and profit from the higher prices that would followThe Sydney Morning Herald, Saturday 24 May 1851, 3
95The fears that gold broughtRev. John West…is made to say that "the whole line of road from Sydney to the Diggings was infested with robbersEmpire (Sydney), Thursday 7 August 1851, 2
97The fears that gold broughtRead estimated that 80% would not have worked in any caseDownload or read text here, and search for phrase: C. Rudston Read, What I saw, heard and did at the Australian Gold Fields, 1853, p. 41
97The fears that gold broughtRead, who was in a position to judge impartially, said the police did "a good line in perjury"Download or read text here, and search for phrase: C. Rudston Read, What I saw, heard and did at the Australian Gold Fields, 1853, p. 55-57
97The fears that gold broughtBushrangers are alleged to have captured a policeman, then bound and thrown him on a soldier-ant nest, where he was stung to deathDownload or read text here, and search for phrase: C. Rudston Read, What I saw, heard and did at the Australian Gold Fields, 1853, p. 220-221
97The fears that gold broughta sub inspector of police called Shadforth was suspended from his office after Ben Hall escaped from a hut Empire (Sydney), Monday 21 March 1864, 3
98The gold escortsWestgarth later established that this particular escort had carried 54,000 ounces of gold, some 1.5 tons, to MelbourneDownload or read text here, and search for phrase: William Westgarth, Victoria, Late Australia Felix, 1853, 216
98The gold escortsThey wore a blue uniform with white facings, and their head-quarters were beside the Commissioners' tent at Forest CreekDownload or read text here, and search for phrase: Mrs Charles (Ellen) Clacy, A Lady's Visit to the Gold Diggings of Australia in 1852-53, ch VI
98The gold escortsThis fellow seems too big for a trooper. Too heavy. It would be too severe on the horses. I think he would make a CommissionerAlan Gross, 'Panton, Joseph Anderson (1831–1913)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University
98The gold escortsheadquarters numbered nearly 300: a commissioner, six assistant commissioners (including Read and Panton) a magistrate, a surgeon, escort officers, police officers, clerks, foot police, mounted police, pensioners, tent-keepers and servantsDownload or read text here, and search for phrase: C. Rudston Read, What I saw, heard and did at the Australian Gold Fields, 1853, p. 142
99The gold escortsVictoria's Attorney-General warned Charles Dight to change the uniforms of his menMelbourne News, Launceston Examiner, Saturday 28 August 1852, 5
101The Nelson caseThe gold is packed in small stout boxes, strengthened with iron hoops, and containing not more than what a man may readily carryDownload or read text here, and search for phrase: William Westgarth, Victoria and the Australian Gold Mines in 1857, 129
104The Nelson caseby 14 April, Captain Wright of the barque Nelson was advertising for gold to be freighted to LondonAdvertisement, The Argus, Wednesday 14 April 1852, 3
104The Nelson caseV. B. Webb, Assay Master and Bullion Broker, was offering to cast owners' gold into ingots with unique markingsAdvertisement, The Argus, Thursday 29 April 1852
115The bushranger who wasn'tThe bearer, Frederick Turner, who arrived in the colony a free immigrant, has served me for twelve months at Twofold Bay, and is now on his way to Sydney to seek employment.The Sydney Monitor and Commercial Advertiser, Monday 8 April 1839, 6
116The bushranger who wasn'tRunaways were usually identified by …. and some descriptive detail such as scars and trade (if any). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Thursday 6 February 1823, 1S
118The bushranger who wasn'tSir John Jamison ... suggested an unpalatable solution … passports for everybodyThe Australian (Sydney), Tuesday 28 July 1835, 4
123-4Sam PooThe wretched man...until his arms were pinioned by the executioners stood at the door of his cell clapping his handsThe Brisbane Courier, Saturday 30 December 1865, 5, quoting the Bathurst Free Press of December 20
131-2Gardiner, Hall, Gilbert and DunnIn 1864, the gang held up the Gundagai Mail, and Gilbert shot Sergeant Parry, a police escort, killing himThe Sydney Morning Herald, Friday 18 November 1864, 5
135Daniel MorganOn the 17th June, 1863, he committed two robberies at "Walla Walla" and on the 18th, a robbery near Albury; on July 20th, at Wallandool…Empire (Sydney), Wednesday 29 March 1865, 4
136Daniel MorganIllustration: The Death of Morgan, 1865.The Australian News for Home Readers, Tuesday 25 April 1865, 1
136Dr. Lang is bailed uphe wrote to Empire, a Sydney newspaper, describing the events he had experienced on the mail coachThe Australian News for Home Readers (Victoria). Thursday 28 March 1867, 9
141John Doolanat a time when John Doolan was inside, still had more than two years' time to serve, and an unknown number of years to liveGranville Allen Mawer, 'Doolan, John (1856–?)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University
142Captain MoonliteOf the four survivors, two served long gaol terms while two, Scott and a man named Rogan, were hanged in Sydney on 20 January, 1880Illustrated Sydney News, Saturday 29 November 1879, 3
146The Kelly GangThomas Curnow ... got himself let loose, so he was able to go along the railway line and stop the train to warn the police of the sabotageThe details are in Curnow's statement, which can be seen online
147The EndNed Kelly goes to the gallowsThe Australasian Sketcher with Pen and Pencil, 20/11/1880, 305
149The bushrangers who never made the big timeIn April, the schooner Speedwell … four escapees, identified in repeated reward offers as Burridge, Styles, Scarr, and PearceThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 23 April 1814, 2
149The bushrangers who never made the big timeThe crimes for which these men were executed were generally of a petty description. Download or read text here, and search for phrase: Boxall's book is available as a free e-text and also as a large-format illustrated edition, published by Viking in 1975, with no hint that the book was first published in 1899, Boxall's text gives one the sense that he had access to some of the "old hands"
150The bushrangers who never made the big timeIn August, His Majesty's schooner Estramina … the captain saw a lugger-rigged vessel "of very singular appearance"The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 8 October 1814, 2
151The bushrangers who never made the big timeWhile the bushranger was looking the other way, the stockman signalled to another servant to come over... he was taken into WindsorThe Monitor (Sydney), Friday 6 April 1827, 2
151The bushrangers who never made the big timeA report in The Australian identifies the servants as William Lyon and Patrick RyanThe Australian (Sydney), Saturday 7 April 1827, 2
151The bushrangers who never made the big time...both Lyon and Ryan had been granted tickets of leave by the governorThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Friday 6 April 1827, 1
151The bushrangers who never made the big timeThree men stopped the driver and took his load away from him, between 9 and 10 p.m. The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 8 January 1831, 2
152The bushrangers who never made the big timeReaching the bridge...after a struggle, the two men were taken prisoner.The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Thursday 22 December 1831, 3
153The bushrangers who never made the big timeA Matthew Lock, probably the same person, received a grant of 100 acres, later in the yearThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, 25 October 1832, 1
153The bushrangers who never made the big timethe judge indicated that he would recommend that the Governor offer Scott mercyThe Sydney Monitor, Saturday 11 February 1832, 2
153The bushrangers who never made the big timestripped the hut, and forcibly carried away a young Red Rover, named Anne Stevens, who was, however, with the greater part of the stolen property, subsequently recapturedThe Sydney Herald, 25 April, 1833, 3
154The bushrangers who never made the big timeIn April, four prisoners from a hulk … he was reported in each case to have only one armThe Sydney Monitor, Wednesday 30 April 1834, 2
158The bushrangers who never made the big timeJohn Lort Stokes: I was here doomed to experience the only instance of incivility I ever found in AustraliaDownload or read text here, and search for phrase: John Lort Stokes, Discoveries in Australia, volume 1, 317-18, 1846
159The bushrangers who never made the big timeThe noted bushranger, Opossum Jack, with a band of ten armed and mounted marauders are on the WilliamsThe Sydney Herald, Monday 9 September 1839, 2
161The bushrangers who never made the big timeThere had been other thefts in the area, mainly thefts from drays, with no help from the policeThe Australian (Sydney), Saturday 17 April 1841, 2
162The bushrangers who never made the big time"Curran the bushranger", was hanged… He had been taken alive, in spite of all his brave wordsThe Sydney Herald, Monday 25 October 1841, 2
163The bushrangers who never made the big time[Fry] had previously shot a notorious bushranger known as "Scotchie," and on another occasion, he had used an empty rusty old musket to capture yet another bushrangerAustralasian Chronicle (Sydney), Tuesday 29 June 1841, 2
169The bushrangers who never made the big timeA man named Hunt and a woman named "Bet Neen" were charged with robbery as bushrangers.Freeman's Journal (Sydney), Saturday 22 October 1870, 2
170-172The bushrangers who never made the big timeList of offenders known as bushrangers, killed or wounded in the colony of New South Wales, from March, 1862, to June, 1870Queanbeyan Age (NSW), Thursday 21 July 1870
175PostwordIllustration: In 1944, the Perth Daily News felt that enough time had gone by to allow an artist to draw the fatal shootingWA's Most Desperate Bushranger Dies', The Daily News (Perth), Saturday 16 December 1944, 23
175PostwordColonel Tom Ochiltree sat in the bar room of the Hoffman yesterday drinking champagne The Daily News (Perth), Monday 9 January 1888, 3
tbaPostwordWA's Most Desperate Bushranger Dies The Daily News (Perth), Saturday 16 December 1944, 23
188Bushrangers and their plantsthe Kelly gang had used the stump as a place to plant things, and there was a cask of gunpowder left behind after the siege at GlenrowanWarwick Examiner and Times (Qld.), Wednesday 27 June 1906, 5
188Bushrangers and their plantsshould Morgan's gold never be found, Nature's gold might, and that of pick and shovel might lead to the discovery of a valuable reefThe Grenfell Record and Lachlan District Advertiser, Saturday 25 November 1882, 2
188Bushrangers and their plantsIn 1890, the young son of a farmer's housekeeper near Muswellbrook found a bottle in a cave while searching for hen's eggsSee for example, Northern Star (Lismore), Wednesday 17 December 1890, 8
189Bushrangers and their plantspeople believed that Harry Power had left a "plant", just before he was captured at the TabernacleThe Sydney Morning Herald, Thursday 4 June 1891, 6
191Bushrangers and their plantsNone of The Jewboy's loot was ever recoveredNewcastle Morning Herald & Miners' Advocate, Saturday 6 June 1953, 5
191Bushrangers and their plantsWhilst fox hunting at Minjary Mountain, Mr. Herb Bye chased a wounded fox under some rocksYoung Witness (NSW), Saturday 18 September 1920, 4
201Song: The Bushranger, Jack PowerPower … drowned in the Murray RiverRiverine Herald (Echuca), Thursday 12 November 1891, 3


wantabadgery-bushrangers (62K)
The Wantabadgery bushrangers on trial. Moonlite is on the left.

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