Places Around Sydney

This is a dump page of all the pictures I have collected so far. No frills, just pics, but there are ALT tags, and I have now added those ALT tags as captions.

The Three Sisters, Katoomba. Iron Cove and the Iron Cove Bridge. Ant Lion Pit. Pictures above, from left to right:

Bent Street sign. Bluebottles stranded on a beach can still sting. Sydney Harbour Bridge, seen from Circular Quay. Pictures above, from left to right: After a bushfire. Central Railway: ticket office and the clock for meeting under. Central Railway, Sydney: places to feed, drink and buy books and papers. Pictures above, from left to right: Captain Cook cruises leave from Circular Quay. Captain Cook cruises leave from Circular Quay. The track down Dobroyd Head, Spit Manly Walk. Pictures above, from left to right: Dwarf apple, Angophora caudifolia. Farm Cove and the Royal Botanic Gardens. A Manly ferry crossing the heads. Pictures above, from left to right: A Manly ferry at the wharf at Manly. Flannel flowers near Sydney. The G'day Café, George Street, The Rocks.  Eat in the courtyard out the back. Pictures above, from left to right: A large gum tree. Hakea is known as needlebush for obvious reasons. Sydney Harbour, near Manly, in winter. Pictures above, from left to right:  Sydney Harbour, near Manly, in winter.  Sydney Harbour, near Manly, in winter. Koala Tea. Pictures above, from left to right: Leptospermum. A magpie joins the picnic. Manly surf beach, near North Steyne, on a rough day when the beach was closed.  Part of North Head and St Patrick's visible in the background, also the Shelly Beach area. Pictures above, from left to right: Manly surf beach, near North Steyne, on a rough day when the beach was closed. Yachts near Manly at dusk. Manly Cove, east side, with departing ferry. Pictures above, from left to right: Manly Cove, east side, with departing ferry. Manly Cove, east side, with Manly Wharf. Manly Cove, east side, with seats and picnic tables. Pictures above, from left to right: Manly ferry. Manly ferry. Manly ferry. Pictures above, from left to right: Manly Wharf, as the ferry approaches it. The Museum of Contemporary Art. Middle Head, see from North Head, Sydney Harbour. Pictures above, from left to right: Walking near the water, heading for Manly, at North Harbour Reserve on the Spit-Manly walk. Signage and steps at North Harbour Reserve on the Manly-Spit walk. Low tide mud flats sometimes offer a short-cut near North Harbour Reserve on the Manly-Spit walk. Pictures above, from left to right: Picnic tables and free barbecue at North Harbour Reserve on the Spit-Manly walk. The map displayed at North Harbour Reserve on the Spit-Manly walk. Approaching the steps and map at North Harbour Reserve on the Spit-Manly walk.  This is where you decide whether to cross the mud flats or not: the white bridge (upper left) is used at high tide. Pictures above, from left to right: Surf below North Head, looking north. Sandstone in the cliff, North Head. Sandstone in the cliff, North Head. Pictures above, from left to right: Path on the walkway, North Head: easy for wheelchairs, great place to see wildflowers in spring! Looking down Middle Harbour from North Head, Manly ferry just visible. The entrance arch as you approach North Head, just past Manly Hospital: about 2.5 kilometres to go, but it is all level from here. Pictures above, from left to right: North Head at the entrance to Sydney Harbour. The Orient Hotel, George Street, The Rocks. Sydney Harbour pilot boat returning from a drop. Pictures above, from left to right: Inner harbour ferry. Circular Quay.  A Rivercat in the foreground, the raised railway behind. Modern Rivercat. Pictures above, from left to right: Old style Rivercat. Kangaroos by the roadside, Jervis Bay. Kangaroo signs warn of kangaroos on the road. Pictures above, from left to right: Wind-sculpted sandstone, North Head. The cliffs south of South Head and Macquarie Light, seen from North Head. South Head and Hornby Light, seen from North Head. Pictures above, from left to right: Macquarie Light, seen from North Head. South Head and Hornby Light, seen from North Head. The city and Bradley's Head are visible in the distance. South Head and Hornby Light, seen from North Head. The city and Bradley's Head are visible in the distance. Pictures above, from left to right: Sheoak, probably Casuarina distyla: dead and waiting to drop its seed. South Head at the entrance to Sydney Harbour. The tourist vessel 'Spirit of Tasmania', entering Sydney Harbour, seen from North Head.
Pictures above, from left to right: Trim, the cat who sailed with Matthew Flinders, a sculpture from the wall of the State Library of NSW. Waratah in bloom, the NSW state flower. Eastern water dragon.
Pictures above, from left to right: The Illawarra escarpment, looking down to Wollongong. Wombat signs warn of wombats on the road.
Pictures above, from left to right: Aboriginal engraving, Kuring-Gai Chase. Mystery flower. A typical arrivals display, Central Railway. A typical departures display, Central Railway. Pictures above, from left to right: The Quarantine Station from Dobroyd at dusk. Small channel marker lighthouse, Sydney Harbour. Governor Macquarie, statue, Macquarie Street. Observatory, ball being raised.
Pictures above, from left to right: Observatory, ball fully raised. Observatory, ball being dropped. Simpson and his donkey, War Memorial, Canberra. Eastern water dragon.
Pictures above, from left to right: William Bligh, statue near Circular Quay. BridgeClimb climbers. Remember: always swim between the flags.
Pictures above, from left to right: Lifesavers look like this when they are on patrol. Sydney Observatory. Governor Phillip, bust near the MCA on Circular Quay.
Pictures above, from left to right: Admiralty House at Kirribilli is the residence of the Governor-General in Sydney. The ANZAC Bridge, seen from the harbour, off Ball's Head. The ANZAC Bridge, seen from the research stacks in Fisher Library.
Pictures above, from left to right: Argyle Cut, looking west, to where Cumberland Street passes over it. Ball's Head and Goat Island from Observatory Park. Ball's Head and Blue's Point, seen from the Manly ferry.
Pictures above, from left to right: Ball's Head and the Bridge, from the Parramatta Rivercat. Balmain, seen from Observatory Park. Balmoral Beach and Middle Head, seen from the Manly ferry.
Pictures above, from left to right: Bottle and Glass Rocks, Sydney Harbour, from the Watson's Bay ferry. Bradley's Head, from the Manly ferry. Bradley's Head and three icons in one shot!
Pictures above, from left to right: Sydney Harbour Bridge. Sydney Harbour Bridge. BridgeClimb climbers.
Pictures above, from left to right: Sydney Harbour Bridge, the Opera House and Fort Denison, seen after a Manly ferry rounds Bradley's Head. Camp Cove, seen from the Manly ferry. Railway Square, Central Railway.
Pictures above, from left to right: Railway Square, Central Railway.  The clock is on the station itself. The city of Sydney, as seen from the harbour, with a Manly ferry, heading for Manly. The city of Sydney, as seen from the harbour, with a Manly ferry, heading for Manly.
Pictures above, from left to right: The city of Sydney, seen from near Watson's Bay. Clark Island. Clark Island.
Pictures above, from left to right: Cockatoo Island. Circular Quay, Sydney. Dawes Point, Sydney, at the foot of the Harbour Bridge.
Pictures above, from left to right: Dawes Point, Sydney, at the foot of the Harbour Bridge. Delwood Beach near Manly. Dobroyd Head, part of the Sydney Harbour National Park.
Pictures above, from left to right: Sydney's Domain, seen from the harbour. Sydney's Domain, seen from the harbour. Double Bay: you can get there by ferry or bus, and picnic by the water.
Pictures above, from left to right: The Ensemble Theatre, a converted boatshed on the edge of the harbour. Fort Denison. Fort Denison.
Pictures above, from left to right: A Moreton Bay fig, Observatory Park. Gladesville Bridge, seen in profile. Gladesville Bridge from below.
Pictures above, from left to right: Gladesville Bridge from below.  The arches were laid on formwork, one by one, and expanded to raise them.  Each arch is made of concrete boxes with concrete pumped in between under pressure. Goat Island, Sydney Harbour. Government House, formerly the abode of the State Governor, now a place for ceremonies.
Pictures above, from left to right:
  • Gladesville Bridge from below. The arches were laid on formwork, one by one, and expanded to raise them. Each arch is made of concrete boxes with concrete pumped in between under pressure.
  • Goat Island, Sydney Harbour.
  • Government House, formerly the abode of the State Governor, now a place for ceremonies. Grotto Point and Grotto Point Lighthouse.  Rosherville Light is visible, just to the right of the Grotto Point Light. Grotto Point and Grotto Point Lighthouse. Small patches of parkland can often be found where streets reach the water.
    Pictures above, from left to right: The shores of Sydney harbour are dotted with paths and walking tracks. The shores of Sydney harbour are dotted with paths and walking tracks. The shores of Sydney harbour are dotted with paths and walking tracks.
    Pictures above, from left to right: The Mosman ferry on its way. A jetcat approaching Circular Quay. Kirribilli Wharf.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Kirribilli Wharf. Luna Park, seen from Observatory Park. Mangroves on the Parramatta River
    Pictures above, from left to right: Seagulls often fly with the Manly ferries, riding the pressure wave that builds up. Kayaks in the harbour, close to Manly, part of North harbour in the background. Manly Pool, a safe place to swim in the harbour.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Manly Pool, a safe place to swim in the narbour. Maroubra Beach, looking south. Maroubra Beach, looking north.
    Pictures above, from left to right: An electric barbecue on the grass behind Maroubra Beach. The headland south of Maroubra. Lifesavers on patrol at Maroubra.
    Pictures above, from left to right: A surf lifesaving club, in this case, at Maroubra. The Museum of Contemporary Art, as seen from an approaching ferry. Middle Head.  Can you see the artillery observers' posts?
    Pictures above, from left to right: Middle Head. The ferry wharf at Neutral Bay.  Note the bus in the background. North Head.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Nielsen Park. Oysters in the harbour are not safe to eat.  These are at High Street wharf, North Sydney. High Street wharf, North Sydney, with the North Sydney branch of the CBD in the background.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Obelisk Beach. The leading marks that give Obelisk Beach its name.  Ships entering the harbour use these to see an invisible lane marker beyween the inbound and outbound channels. The leading marks that give Obelisk Beach its name.  Ships entering the harbour use these to see an invisible lane marker beyween the inbound and outbound channels.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Sydney Observatory. The Opera House and Fort Denison. The Sydney Opera House, seen from the Manly ferry, looking east.
    Pictures above, from left to right: The Sydney Opera House, seen from the Manly ferry.  The low area on the right is the forecourt, and prt of the Royal Botanic Gardens is on the far right. The Sydney Opera House, seen from the Manly ferry, looking south-east. The end of the Parramatta run: wharf and weir.
    Pictures above, from left to right: The end of the Parramatta run: the weir that marks the head of navigation. The end of the Parramatta run: the wharf. Parsley Bay.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Parsley Bay. Fort Denison. The Quarantine Station (now disused).
    Pictures above, from left to right: Quarantine Station: the beach. Quay Deli and coffee shop: two good places for a quick cheap feed, near Wharf 4, on the landward side. The Royal Botanic Gardens and the Opera House.
    Pictures above, from left to right: A Rivercat. The shore, just south of Nielsen Park. The rotunda at Observatory Park, full of people who think science matters.
    Pictures above, from left to right: In the Rose Bay area, you are crossing a gazetted airfield - for seaplanes.  Look up! Shark Island. Shark Island.
    Pictures above, from left to right: South Head. South Head. South Head.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Store Beach, just north of the Quarantine Station. A tug on the harbour. Watson's Bay.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Watson's Bay.  Watson's Bay.  Watson's Bay.
    Pictures above, from left to right: The wharves, west of the harbour bridge. The wharves, west of the harbour bridge. Yachts on the harbour.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Yachts on the harbour. Yachts on the harbour.
    Parts of the cliffs near Cape Banks need care. Caustis, a protected species. Railway indicator board, Circular Quay.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Sooty oystercatcher, Botany Bay. The view north from Cape Banks. The view north from Cape Banks.
    Pictures above, from left to right: The Jennifer Street entry point to the walks near Cape Banks. Banksia ericifolia, appropriately at Cape Banks. A map of the area is displayed close to the Jennifer Street entrance.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Looking across to Cape Banks.  There is an oystercatcher in this picture, and a volcanic dike, slightly to the left, out of the picture.  Go see! Bare Island fort, Botany Bay. Bare Island fort, Botany Bay.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Sydney Harbour Bridge at dawn. Buskers at Circular Quay. Cape Solander from Cape Banks.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Caustis, a protected species. Central railway, coming out of the City Circle underground section. Sydney at dawn, ANZAC Day, 2006.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Sydney at dawn, ANZAC Day, 2006. Yellow-tailed black cockatoo. Collins Flat, near Manly.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Walking along the track: this is the easy part, suitable for all ages. The track near Mount Kuring-gai. The track forks: go left for views.
    Pictures above, from left to right: The entry point to Cowan Creek walks at Mount Kuring-gai. The view seen when you follow the left fork at the top of the track. The view seen when you follow the left fork at the top of the track.
    Pictures above, from left to right: This is the end of the really easy section, but it isn't a BAD stroll. Current bedding on Bell's Line of Road, Blue Mountains. Walking along the Devonshire Street Tunnel, Central Railway.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Entry point for the railway Square part of the Devonshire Street Tunnel, Central Railway. A memorial to four National Parks staff, killed in a controlled burn that went wrong. A memorial to four National Parks staff, killed in a controlled burn that went wrong.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Eucalyptus tree. Honeycomb weathering in sandstone, Botany Bay. Jetcat arriving at Manly Wharf.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Little Manly Point. Little Manly. Little Manly.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Manly Wharf, late on an autumn afternoon. Manly Wharf, late on an autumn afternoon. Manly Wharf entry.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Manly Wharf entry. Manly Wharf, late on an autumn afternoon. Manly Wharf, late on an autumn afternoon.
    Pictures above, from left to right: The monorail. Oceanworld, Manly. Parramatta Road near Sydney University, with buses.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Quarantine Station, North Head. Circular Quay railway station. Circular Quay railway station.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Rowers on Sydney Harbour, ANZAC Day, 2006, returning from a dawn service under the ANZAC Bridge. Rowers on Sydney Harbour, ANZAC Day, 2006, returning from a dawn service under the ANZAC Bridge. The entrance to the Seymour Centre, obscured by building works.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Store Beach, near the Quarantine Station. Termite mound, Kuring-gai Chase. At Mount Tomah, looking down.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Looking out from the restaurant verandah, Mount Tomah. The outside verandah, Mount Tomah restaurant. The interior, Mount Tomah restaurant.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Looking back up the slope at Mount Tomah. A train standing at Central Railway: note the double-decker section in the middle. Victoria Park, looking away from the University of Sydney.
    Pictures above, from left to right: The University of Sydney's gothic sandstone, from Victoria Park. Fig tree and pond, Victoria Park. Victoria Pass, coming down off the western side of the Blue Mountains.
    Pictures above, from left to right: The pond at Victoria Park. The pond at Victoria Park, complete with birds. The pond at Victoria Park.
    Pictures above, from left to right: The pool at Victoria Park. The pool at Victoria Park. Wollemi pine at Mount Tomah, a recently discovered 'living fossil'.
    Pictures above, from left to right: The view seen when you follow the left fork at the top of the track. The view seen when you follow the left fork at the top of the track. The Art Gallery of NSW, seen from Art Gallery Road.
    Pictures above, from left to right: The Art Gallery of NSW, seen from Art Gallery Road. The 'Old Man banksia, <I>Banksia serrata</i>. The 'Old Man banksia, <I>Banksia serrata</i>.
    Pictures above, from left to right: The wharves at Circular Quay offer a great view at the end, with glass to keep the weather out in winter. A Sulphur-crested cockatoo, seen in the Royal Botanic Gardens. The Dobroyd crossroads, Manly-Spit walk.
    Pictures above, from left to right: A view of the Domain from the Royal Botanic Gardens. Flying foxes (fruit bats) in the Royal Botanic Gardens. Flying foxes (fruit bats) in the Royal Botanic Gardens.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Flying fox (fruit bat) in the Royal Botanic Gardens. Forty Baskets beach, Manly-Spit walk. Mrs Macquarie's Chair, seen from the shoreline in the RBG.
    Pictures above, from left to right: North Harbour Reserve, on the Manly-Spit walk. The forecourt of the Opera House, heading towards the Botanic Gardens. Opera Quays: the walkway from Circular Quay, heading for the Opera House.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Opera Quays: the walkway from Circular Quay, heading for the Opera House. The Circular Quay railway station, seen from Opera Quays. The Royal Botanic Gardens.
    Pictures above, from left to right: The Royal Botanic Gardens at the lower entry near the Opera House. The Royal Botanic Gardens has this naff little train at the lower entry near the Opera House. The Royal Botanic Gardens fern collection.
    Pictures above, from left to right: The Royal Botanic Gardens fern collection. The Royal Botanic Gardens café - don't leave your food unguarded, or an ibis may get it! The Royal Botanic Gardens lake is an excellent place to see waterbirds.
    Pictures above, from left to right: The Royal Botanic Gardens lake is an excellent place to see waterbirds. The Royal Botanic Gardens lake is an excellent place to see waterbirds. Reef Beach, on the Manly-Spit walk.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Reef Beach, on the Manly-Spit walk. A she-oak, or Casuarina (OK, Allocasuarina, you pedant!). The sow and pigs, the only hazard to navigation in the harbour.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Portions of the Spit-Manly walk go over fragiule ground, so boardwalks are used. Sign on the Spit-Manly walk.  High tide is rarely a problem. A portion of the Spit-Manly walk: this section is occasionally used by vehicles, so it is suitable for wheelchairs.  To get to it, you go down a VERY steep hill - go carefully, or drive to the bottom to drop the wheelchair person.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Whale Beach, seen from the terrace of Jonah's. The stairs that lead to the pedestrian way over the Harbour Bridge.  They lead down to Cumberland Street, south of where it crosses Argyle cut. The stairs that lead up to the pedestrian way over the Harbour Bridge.  Find them in Cumberland Street, south of where it crosses Argyle cut.
    Pictures above, from left to right: Cadman's Cottage. A busker playing the er hu at Circular Quay. One of the wharves along Hickson Road.
    Pictures above, from left to right: The steps leading down from Fort Street to Hickson Road and the wharves. The Wharf Theatre, Hickson Road. The wharves along Hickson Road.
    Pictures above, from left to right: A busker playing the bagpipes at Circular Quay on a winter day: note the thongs (aka zoris, flip-flops or jandals). The last remaining (I think) cast-iron gentlemen's urinal in Sydney, under the bridge at the northern end of Cumberland Street. The Royal Botanic Gardens offers this cactus near the upper entry. The Argyle Stairs: go up these to Cumberland Street to make your way onto the bridge.
    Pictures above, from left to right:
    The steps leading up from Hickson Road and the wharves to Fort Street. Pimelea Pictures to left:

    Pimelea Flannel flower, Actinotus Isopogon, drumsticks
    Pictures above, from left to right: Isopogon, drumsticks Isopogon, drumsticks Isopogon, drumsticks
    Pictures above, from left to right: Hibbertia Melaleuca Epacris longiflora, native fuchsia
    Pictures above, from left to right: Bachelor's buttons, Kunzea capitata Bachelor's buttons, Kunzea capitata Grevillea sericea
    Pictures above, from left to right: Grevillea buxifolia Grevillea buxifolia Melaleuca
    Pictures above, from left to right: Leptospermum Leptospermum Darwinia
    Pictures above, from left to right: Darwinia Probably Olearia Pea, probably Dillwynia
    Pictures above, from left to right: Pea, possibly Gompholobium Dianella Dianella
    Pictures above, from left to right: Dog rose, Bauera rubioides Dog rose, Bauera rubioides Thysanotus
    Pictures above, from left to right:

    This file is http://members.ozemail.com.au/~macinnis/syd/gallery.htm, first created on April 2, 2006. Last recorded revision (well I get lazy and forget sometimes!) was on October 17, 2006.

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