Notes

[NI0021] Claire was born in Dorchester, Massachusetts. Her natural mother was unmarried and of Irish parents. She was baptised in Dorchester, Massachusetts as Claire Marie Carroll. She was adopted as a young child by the Belyea family, and raised in Bilerica, Massachusetts.

[NI0025] Patricia, who is known as Tricia, was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, near Boston. The family was temporarily living in Lowell, because her father was a professor at the M.I.T. in Cambridge. A few years later the family moved to Columbus, Ohio. Patricia, like all her 10 brothers and sisters studied at the local catholic high school. Waterson High School. She later attended the University of Dayton and graduated with a degree in accounting and computer science. After graduation she stayed in Dayton, and a few years later met, Ray. She married Ray on December 1986 near her family's home in Ohio. Ray promised to take all around the world and within 6 months the couple was living in South Africa.

[NI0322] Raymond, like his father and grandfather before him, was known as an adventurous and fun loving with an outgoing personality. Known as Ray by his family and friends, he studied at the Northampton Grammar School from 1972 until 1976. He then became a student of computer science at Coventry University and clearly showed a bent for business. After graduating in 1979 Ray joined NCR, a multi-billion American computer corporation, and he was initially based in London, England. Ray completed his graduate training in first place and was quickly promoted to the sales training department. In 1980 he became a qualified instructor and was transferred to Birmingham. In 1983 Ray left NCR and joined Sphinx Limited, a start-up company, based in Maidenhead, England. In 1984 his long time wish was granted and he moved to the USA, where he had been recruited to re-join NCR based in Dayton, Ohio. Although planned as a three-year assignment this move turned out to be an emigration. Over the next few short years Ray traveled throughout the world visiting over 60 countries. During a brief return from his travels in the Middle East early in 1986, Ray met Tricia in his apartment complex neighborhood, and after about 7 months courting they married. In 1987 they moved to South Africa shortly after the birth of their first child, Andrew. They loved living in South Africa and had a very enjoyable and successful expatriate assignment. It was here early in 1989, that their twin boys, Brian and Brendan, were born. Later that year they returned to the USA and moved to South Carolina. In 1991 Ray was promoted and the family moved to Arkansas. During his time in Arkansas, Ray founded and developed one of America's largest charity events, the Cancer Challenge. In 1993 Ray became one of the youngest vice president's for NCR at age 33. During this stay in Arkansas their fourth and final child, Kevin, was born. In 1996 Ray joined Hewlett-Packard and one year later the family moved to Atlanta, where they have lived since. Since then Ray has lent his business expertise to several start up companies. Ray was an avid football player and supporter and played at many levels for over 30 years. He passed this love of 'soccer' onto his four boys. In addition to being an accomplished athlete playing golf, tennis and squash, Ray enjoys traveling, tinkering with computers, drinking fine wines, music, reading, history and genealogy. In December 1999 Ray became an American citizen, never giving up his British or Irish citizenship, and carrying passports of all three countries. Considering himself as an Irish-American born in England, Ray is extremely attached to his Irish roots. Ray is an amateur genealogist and he has enjoyed a lifetime interest in the history of his family. Ray developed this interest in genealogy as a young boy and his interview notes and family tales date back to the late 1960's. He started the formal documentation of the family records in 1982 and completed the first electronic version of the family tree in 1992. Ray is the author of this report. He is alive and living in Atlanta, USA. His address is 680 Turbridge Court, Alpharetta, GA, USA. His email address is raymondkelly@yahoo.com..

[NI0323] Patrick's death came about a decade after the civil war and the country was still extremely divided. Politics was a dangerous game in the thirties and activists on both sides came from all walks of life. By 1939 things were a little clearer in Irish politics and a new constitution had been written. For the first time in years, it looked as if things were settling down in Irish politics. And then the Second World War broke out. To show their independence from Britain, the Irish took a neutral position during the war, and many hardships were imposed. Like everyone in Ireland, the Kelly children experienced food rationing and wide ranging censorship. Even before the war ended in 1945, Ireland's real problems emerged clearly once again and emigration to England and America began again on a large scale. With the exception of the youngest child, John, all the Kelly siblings emigrated during the next few years. Thomas Patrick, the eldest son was just ten years old when his father died. Like his father before him, Tom Kelly had an adventurous youth, and was known to be an ardent follower of his father's politics. As a young man he worked on the home farm. He also spent some time in Broadford, County Clare, helping at the farm of the MacDonnell's, his cousins. It was during this time that he met his future wife, Mary Frances Vaughan. Tom was an excellent horseman and adept at training. He was often called upon by friendship to deal with difficult horses, in fact the original horse whisperer! In 1944 when he was 20, Tom followed his sisters to Northampton in England. He was initially was employed on Lady Hesketh's estate, a Catholic and extensive landowner near Towcester Northampton. His first farming job paid him 2 pounds a week, of which 10 shillings was kept to pay for his keep. Tom's career breakthrough occurred with the British Gas Board. His sister Ina lent him seven pounds to buy a bike, and Tom started to bike regularly into Northampton where he became well known at the Irish Club, and became friends with several influential people in the Gas Board. A few years after arriving in England without a job he secured employment with the British Gas Board in Gas Distribution throughout the UK. He was headhunted some years later by R.H. McCullough Limited a private civil engineering company. In 1949 Tom obtained his British National Identity Card and seemed to be settling down in England. Meanwhile Tom had lost contact with Mary Frances while she was still living in Broadford. He had been writing to her for many years without a reply. It transpired that one of his cousins in Broadford, had bribed the Broadford postmaster to deliver Tom's letters to him, rather than to Mary Frances. However, one of the letters made it through and Mary Frances contacted Tom. This incident prompted Mary Frances to leave Broadford for England where she obtained a nursing job in Liverpool. After several years of long distance courtship they married in 1953. They moved to London in 1954. Initially they lived in East Finchley and later to Highgate where Carmel, their first child was born in 1955. They then moved to St. Albans, North London, in the late 1950's where their first son, Raymond was born. Very successful in the Gas Distribution business, he was promoted to managing director of R.H. McCullough in 1962 and the family returned to Northampton where they have lived since and where their youngest child, David, was born in 1963. Tom's hobbies are golf and boating. His motorboat, which he often took to Ireland on holiday, gave him many years of enjoyment. He is now retired and living in Northampton.

[NI0324] Mary Frances Vaughan, was born and raised in Broadford, Co. Clare and known as Frances to her friends and family. She was a vey popular girl and very active in her community. Her skills in Gaelic language were legendary in her area, and she won a scholarship to Carrigaholt Irish College (a Gaelic speaking college) when she was 13 years old. Mary Frances was also a prominent member of the Irish and English Dramatic Troupes of Broadford. She was also an accomplished organist, and played the church organ every Sunday for about 10 years while living in Broadford. As a young teenage girl she, like most of the Irish, suffered from food rationing and poor transportation during the Second World War. Tea and dried fruit were the two food products she recounted missing the most. Her family would use a tea bag three times before throwing it out, drying it out and re-using it each time. She also remembers helping her brothers cut some of their trees down to make wood, which they would sell in nearby Limerick City to people in need of fuel because of the coal shortage. Frances left Ireland in 1950 to attend the Sefton General Hospital in Nursing School, in Liverpool, England. She qualified as a State Registered Nurse and also a Certified Midwife. Three years later she married her first boyfriend, Tom, when she was 25 years old. They moved to East Finchley, London, in 1954, where she became a private nurse at the Finchley Memorial Hospital. She moved to Highgate in 1955 where she she had her first child, Carmel. They moved to St. Albans, North London in the late 1950's and Raymond was born in the Luton and Dunstable General Hospital. The family moved to Northampton in 1962. She has lived there since. Her last child, David, was born in Northampton in 1963. Frances worked for twenty years at the Northampton General Hospital as a phlebotomist. Frances is a very popular woman with all who know her. She enjoys swimming, gardening, international travel and being a Grandmother. Mary Frances took the confirmation name, Angela.

[NI0325] Carmel was the first lady of Irish decent to be chosen a debutante at the Queen Charlotte Ball held in Grosvenor House, London. It is the traditional coming out party for English society girls, and Carmel was 18 at the time. Her escort was the Viscount Alexander, son of the Earl and Countess at Calendon. She was further honored to be chosen as the lady in attendance to Her Grace, The Duchess of Buccleuch and Queensbury, who as guest of honor received the debutantes. Carmel was educated at the Notre Dame Convent, Northampton and the University of East Anglia in Norwich, where she read French. Carmel graduated in 1978 with a double major in the French language and European Literature. She later received a Post Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) and a Masters Degree in Information Systems from the University of Brighton. Carmel became a lecturer at the University and also ran the Queens Park Book Publishing Company. Carmel trained as a counselor and she is currently a social worker. Carmel married Kenneth Guy on April 14, 1984 and she has two children, Vaughan and Sian.

[NI0327] Patrick Michael was known as a jovial, happy go lucky individual with a freckled face and thick red hair. He was tall (6 ft 3 inches) and athletic and very fond of sports. He was very popular at school and his impish provocativeness led him into a fair share of scrapes. He was known as the hero of hundreds of boyish pranks. Patrick was privately educated at home until 1889, when at the age of 14 he was sent to the Jesuit college of Mungret in Limerick where he stayed until 1891. He then became a medical student at Cork University, but clearly retained a bent for adventure. The call to arms by the British Army in 1893 fetched this 18-year-old student of medicine from London and then to South Africa to take part in the Boer War. His mother, Bridget Kelly (nee Davoran), did not want him to join the army. When she heard of his plan she drove the long journey by horse and buggy to the docks in Cork to dissuade him from leaving Ireland. She missed him by less than 20 minutes. She then wrote to Patrick's cousin, Lieutenant-General Thomas Kelly-Kenny (who was later knighted by King George for his support of the Crown), to implore his to persuade Patrick to return to University but he refused. Patrick requested to be posted to the Boer War and he promptly dispatched for South Africa as a member of the First Lifeguards, often known as the Queens Guards or the Household Cavalry. Patrick had a very successful career in the Lifeguards and received medals from the Army for his efforts in the battles of Witteberger, Diamond Hill, Johannesburg, Driefontein, Paardeberg and the relief of Kimberly. Patrick was known to be a fantastic horseman and one of a few who managed to bring his horse back in good condition from the many battles. In London during a visit to the Royal Family in 1898, Kaiser William of Germany, picked out Patrick as the best turned-out horseman and soldier in the regiment. After his military career, Patrick returned to Ireland and figured prominently in public life. His efforts in the war had earned him the sobriquet or nickname "Soldier", by which he was affectionately known among his friends afterwards. In February 1914 at age 39, he married his childhood sweetheart, Bridget 'Pidgie' Kelly, whose family was from Spancilhill, Dysert, and well known in East Clare. During the next 5 years, Patrick and Bridget had 4 daughters and must have given up on having a son, because they had no more children for another 5 years until Thomas Patrick was born. This opened the floodgates and they had another three boys. By this time Patrick was running the farm in Clonina. Patrick had become a very popular figure in County Clare and he was appointed to various positions on the County Council and Board of Health for County Clare. In the aftermath of the Easter Rising of 1916, a wave of nationalist fervor ensued and the Irish were quick to organize and become a political force with the objective of seeking independence from Great Britain. In the general election of 1918, the republican movement, Sinn Fein, completely eclipsed the Irish party. Its selected members, instead of going to Westminster, set up an illegal assembly in Dublin called Dail Eireann (Parliament of Ireland). The Dail was presided over by Eamon de Valera, a young teacher who had been born in America to an Irish mother and a Spanish father. Patrick supported the underground government and the efforts of the Sinn Fein as in 1919 he was appointed magistrate in the Sinn Fein Courts. Michael Collins, like de Valera, a survivor of the 1916 Rising, formed the IRA, a secret volunteer army organized to fight British intelligence. Patrick must have been well known to Collins, as his second cousin, Susan Blackall, was Michael Collins' first girlfriend. She was a highly intelligent girl who obtained scholarships and worked with Collins in the Post Office in London. At the outbreak of the First World War, she came back to work in a Dublin bookshop, and their romance foundered. Collins returned to take part in the 1916 Rising. Although their romance was on the rocks, Susan gave immense help to Collins during the period 1918 to 1921. Under Collins's leadership the IRA made their presence felt. Small groups of IRA men, known as 'flying columns' ambushed the British forces and murdered people siding with the British. During this time the IRA in Doonbeg cruelly murdered the British Judge for West Clare, Judge Lendrem. This upset the British forces, and although he did not approve of the deed, Patrick's family home, Clonina House, was raided several times by the mercenary British para-military forces. This force, who were known as the Black and Tans, because of the mixture of police and military uniforms its members wore, did a lot to discredit British rule in Ireland. Patrick's life was spared more than once when a "regular" army officer became aware of his British army connections. The armed struggle became a conflict between terror and counter-terror with publicity playing a great part as world opinion was greatly influenced by the tactics of the British government. In 1921 a truce was declared to enable a delegation for Dail Eireann to discuss a settlement with a British delegation led by David Lloyd George and Winston Churchill. The War of Independence concluded with the signing of the flawed and contentious Anglo-Irish Treaty in 1922. In this treaty the southern 26 counties became an independent Free State, with the same rights under the crown as Canada or Australia. Michael Collins and many of his supporters, including Patrick, believed that the treaty was the first step to achieve even greater freedom. However, de Valera and his supporters wanted to hold out for a true Republic and the country became bitterly divided. In 1922, the republicans, who were led by Eamon de Valera, engaged in a civil war with the supporters of the treaty, who were led by Michael Collins. Less than a year after it started, the civil war was over. Although Collins was killed in an ambush, the treatyites formed a Provisional government and de Valera was imprisoned. The Sinn Fein split up over the treaty, and those who supported the treaty founded the Cumann na nGaedael party. This literally means Club of the Irish, but it later became the Fine Gael party, meaning Family of the Irish. The Cumann na nGaedael won the first election and formed the first government of the Irish Free State under the leadership of W.T. Cosgrove. Patrick was a very active member of the Cumann na nGaedhael and Fine Gael, and he became even more popular in West Clare politics. In 1926 Eamon de Valera, was released from jail and he formed a new political party called the Fianna Fail (Soldiers of Ireland), which became the official party in opposition. On September 15th, 1927, Patrick and Eamon de Valera were both elected to the Dail Eireann, which was now the legal government, as members for County Clare. Although Patrick received 5,647 votes, de Valera received a massive 13,903 votes. Patrick and de Valera were both also elected to the parliament, based on the proportional representation system of the Irish parliament. Patrick remained in the Dail as a Teachtai Dala (Dail deputies or TD's, meaning Members of Parliament) until his death in 1934. Eamon de Valera went on to become the elected president of the Irish Republic and is recognized as one of the greatest statesmen in 20th century world politics. At the young age of 59, Patrick's political life was brought to a sad conclusion when he died of Pneumonia and Septicemia (i.e. blood poisoning), which he incurred from a prick of a thorn bush on his farm. His death could have been prevented by penicillin, which had been discovered in 1928, but unfortunately not readily available in Ireland at that time. Patrick was buried at Knocknahilla cemetery, near Clonina. Patrick left his wife and 8 children, the youngest of which was just one year old. Patrick's friend Paddy J. Egan of Tullamore, wrote the following glowing appreciation of Patrick in the Mungret Annual in 1935: 'I remember Pat Kelly very well at Mungret. He was one of the personalities amongst the Lay Boys of the College about 1890. A bright, breezy, and always cheerful lad, very original and liked by all of us, he was one of the few chaps the mention of whose name provoked smiles of affection in all directions. I would not describe him as a worshipper at the shrine of discipline; in fact, I know that he held somewhat elastic views when he came to interpret rules and regulations. Apart from his likable disposition, this certainly did contribute something to his popularity. Most of us did not have either his initiative or courage in this respect... I gather that he was personally as popular in the Dail as he was in Mungret years ago. It was with a keen sense of regret that I heard of his death'.

[NI0328] Bridget, who descended from the Kellys of Dysert was the eldest daughter of Thomas Kelly who came from Spancilhill in Dysert. The oldest record we have of the Kellys of Dysert is on a head stone in the old ruined church at Dysert. The inscription reads, 'God rest the soul of Darby Kelly died 11 July 1787, Erected by his son, Patrick.' Darby lived in Drummina. Drummina, which means 'Little Hills', is a fine farm location in the townlands of Dysert, nestling into the northern flank of a hill, with a view of the Burren hills opposite. Dysert is a beautiful and ancient settlement in lush green pasture and hill country, about eight miles north of Ennis, in County Clare. A clear shallow river runs through the district from Loch Ballycullinan, and there are at least two ancient wells that provide sweet water, and an ancient Bronze Age burial chamber, the Mollaneen wedge tomb, which dates from about 1500 B.C. The first known name of the settlement was Dysert Tola, after St. Tola who founded his church here in the 8th Century. It is a deeply historic site: in 1318 A.D. at the Battle of Dysert O'Dea, the local O'Deas, who had been dominant in the area since the 9th century, broke the power of the Normans in the region (then known as Thomond), stopping the advance of Richard de Clare into Clare, killing him in the battle, and holding back the English thrust into Munster for over two centuries. Religious friction was a running sore in the district. This district was in many ways the front line where traditional Gaelic Catholicism and Tudor and Stuart Protestantism met face on. In 1649 Cromwell's lieutenant and son-in-law Ireton (the man who signed the death warrant for Charles I) arrived in Dysert. The local O'Brien lord, Lord Inchiquin, had been implicated with several other Old Irish lords in rebellion against Cromwell's government in 1648; Cromwell's campaign in response was brutal and effectively ended for good Irish resistance to English political control. When Cromwell's forces arrived in the district, fighting was vicious - a bitter siege of Limerick, 25 miles to the south, left no less than 5,000 townspeople, either killed by the battle or by the plague which broke out. Not surprisingly, after Limerick surrendered, retribution by Ireton's men in Clare - including Dysert O'Dea - was severe. After Clare Castle surrendered as well, the Cromwellians went on up to the Burren, a few miles north of Dysert O'Dea, where Ireton famously reported 'there is not water enough to drown a man, wood enough to hang one, nor earth enough to bury him.' Kellys had started to appear in Dysert during the 17th century. Darby was either a grandson of the Kellys who settled there after the Battle of Kinsale in 1602 or a grandson of the Kellys that moved there after the Cromwellian Settlement, or possibly a son of the Kellys that moved there after the Battle of Aughrim in the 1690's. What we are certain of is that Darby Kelly, who was born early in the 18th century, lived in Drummina and was buried in Dysert in 1787. Darby married Bridget Harrington and they had at least two children, Patrick and Richard. Patrick inherited much of the lands at Drummina when his father, Darby Kelly, died. Patrick married Chuck Brew and had 12 children, and they were fortunate to prosper through a very rough period. The late 1700s and early 1800s was a very troubled time in the Dysert area, caused by religious tensions, evictions and harassment of tenants. This was compounded by the fact that by the 1820's farming conditions were becoming very hard, and famine was said to have affected the area through the failure of the potato crop. Patrick and his family survived and prospered through all this, although two of his 12 children were ordained in Rome, but died of Cholera on a ship on their return trip. Their youngest child Thomas married Bridget Coffey, whose family owned large tracts of land in Tipperary. They had 11 children and the youngest, Bridget Mary 'Pidgie' Kelly, was born in 1887. As a young girl Bridget was sent away to get a great education at Loreto College, and it was there she started to develop a brilliant command of the English language. During her early 20's Bridget was persuaded to stay in Broadford to look after her first cousins, the Coffeys. In 1914, when she was 27 years old she married Patrick Michael on his return from the Boer War campaign. They had 10 children in total, although two were stillborn. When her husband died, Bridget was only 47 years old and she had to raise eight children ranging in age from 1 to 19. Fortunately Patrick's cousin, Mickey, from nearby Cree House, who was 32 years old at the time, stepped in to help take care of the children and the farm. Bridget was a traditional farmer and she resisted the efforts of her boys to mechanize the farm. In the early 1960's a disaster struck Clonina House. One autumn evening after the harvest and the hay barn was full, the entire barn burned down. All the hay was lost leaving the cattle with no feed. Bridget and her family were very popular in the area and all the neighbors came to the rescue. Her husband's cousin J.J. Kelly led such an amazing effort to help out the popular Bridget that the hay barn was overflowing and some had to be returned to the amazingly generous neighbors. The cattle were fed again. Soon after that event, Bridget left Clonina and lived out her life with her children in Northampton, England. Patrick's death was devastating for Bridget and she never fully recovered, although she remarkably lived another 37 years. Her youngest son, John, took over Clonina, and his family is still living there today.

[NI0329] Ina was the oldest child, and like her mother she was educated at Loreto College. She was the first to emigrate to England in the early 1940's. All four of the girls became nursing sisters and moved away during this time. Ina and Bunty both settled down in Northampton, which was rapidly becoming a refuge for the many Irish emigrants. Ina married Joe Lohan, an Irishman living in Northampton.

[NI0330] Prior to her father's death Susan was already taking an active role in local politics. She supported a Nationalist, anti-IRA organization called the Blueshirts, that got its name from the color of the shirts its members wore. Although the Blueshirts were in existence only briefly their voice was certainly heard. During a meeting of about 120 Blueshirts in nearby Kilrush in June 1934, over 300 IRA supporters attempted to storm the meeting and many people were hurt. For all the political tension, hatred and animosity that existed it is surprising that there were so few injuries. Susan, who was known as Bunty, was 18 years old at the time was already a Corporal in the Blueshirts. She attended the meeting in Kilrush and was injured when a stone struck her. According to a police file that was released in 1991 under the 1986 National Archive Act, things could have been much worse. An article on this incident was published in the local newspaper, but Bunty's name was not mentioned in the article, which is fortunate, as it would have embarrassed her father who was still the Fine Gael TD for West Clare. When she was in her early 20's Bunty left for England to follow her sister, Ina, who was already there. Bunty became a nurse in Northampton General Hospital, married and settled down in Northampton.

[NI0331] Anna Mary, known as Nancy, was educated and lived at home until at age 27 she became a nun. On 25th May 1946 Nancy joined the nursing and teaching order of the Sisters of Saint John of God, and later went with a mission to Australia, where she still lives today. Her initial training was in The Noviciate in Ballinamore, Co. Mayo. She was received six months later and was given "Antoinette" as her religious name. Her First Profession took place on the 18th December 1948. She left Ireland on 1st May 1949 by boat for a six weeks voyage to the St John of God Noviciate, Subiaco, West Australia. Her Final Profession took place on the 18th December 1951. She completed her General Nursing training at the St. John of God Private Hospital in Subiaco and in 1956 she was sent to the St. John of God Private Hospital in Geraldton. At this time, the St. John of God North West Mission was requesting volunteers to help with their work with Aboriginal people in the Government-run Native Hospitals, which catered for midwifery, medical, and children patients. Sr. Antoinette nursed at the Derby Native Hospital that consisted of three disposable army nissan huts - a big change from the private hospitals at Subiaco and Geraldton. The climate was dry with wet seasons, the surrounding country was habited by snakes, lizards, cockroaches, centipedes, scorpions, flies and ants in abundance and, on night duty, the kerosene hurricane lamp attracted all kinds of flying insects. All of this added to the new venture. These were very busy years for Sr. Antoinette and there was no time to think of the culture shock with very sick babies and children, women for delivery and wards full of medical cases. They came in by boat loads from an Aboriginal Mission, by truck loads from surrounding cattle stations and by the Royal Flying Doctor Service from the out-back, plus the endless daily stream of men, women and children from the Derby Native Reserve. But she was happy in the midst of trials and tribulations surrounded by her friends, the other John of God Sisters. Sr. Antoinette was sent to the Catholic Beagle Bay Mission in the late 1950's. She was the only nurse with a doctor visiting from Broome once every six weeks. Realizing the need to have the Midwifery Nursing Training and Certificate in 1960 she returned to Subiaco. By this time there was a new midwifery hospital with all the mod cons, doctors in plenty and nine students in the group doing midwifery. After twelve months training she returned to the Derby Native Hospital feeling better equipped to handle the daily routine. A new block was built at Derby Regional Hospital and sisters and patients were transferred from the Native Hospital. Granada Convent was built for the Sisters' accommodation with Sr. Damian now acting as deputy matron. Sr. Antoinette went to the maternity ward, two sisters to the surgical ward and one to the children's ward. Nursing was easier now in the new surroundings, with the space and equipment providing a wonderful boon. Now they nursed all patients regardless of color or creed. In 1971 Sr. Antoinette went home to Ireland for the first time for a holiday. On her return she joined the St. John of God Sisters who were staffing the Government-run leprosarium 25 kilometers out of Derby where she nursed with leprosy patients until it closed in 1986. Because of their efforts and their many years of hard work and dedication, leprosy has been all but wiped out in that area. From there she moved back into Granada Convent, Derby and worked at the Public Health Disease Control Unit updating and preparing the Kimberley register of sexually transmitted diseases for computerization. In February 1996, Sr. Antoinette retired and stayed on at Granada Convent until 2000 when she moved to the new Granada Convent where she now lives happily.

[NI0332] Carmel became a qualified nursing sister, and served in the British Army during World War II. She then went to Australia where she spent two years nursing with the Repatriation Department at the hospital in Concord, Sydney. Carmel was always interested in art, and while in Sydney she took the opportunity to attend a local art school. When she returned to Ireland she continued her studies in Limerick, while also attending painting schools in Kerry and Lisdoonvarna. She became a popular artist in Clare and her work was included among exhibitions in Dublin, Limerick and Ennis, and she had her own very successful show in Cashel, Co. Tipperary. The Clare Champion newspaper featured her work at their headquarters in Ennis. She had three paintings on show: one depicts Chapel Lane in her hometown; another was of Milie's Forge in Lisdoonvarna and a third was entitled Portrait of a Young Man.

[NI0333] Patrick Michael Kelly, called Pat, was named after his father, and was the third youngest of the family. He attended Clohanbeg National School and then the Christian Brothers National and Secondary College in Ennis, during which time he stayed with his father's sister, Mary Culligan, on her farm in Drumcliffe, Ennis. After obtaining his Leaving Certificate, he managed the home farm at Clonina House and outside farm at Dysart, near Ennis, until he was 28 years old. He did two short spells in England to obtain working capital. He was ahead of his time in analyzing the soil, spreading lime fertilizer and undertaking considerable land reclamation. In 1956, he moved to Canada where he studied hotel and catering management in Toronto. He was then employed as a trainee manager with The Dominion Catering Company of Canada. Later he was promoted to manager of the Elliot Lake Uranium Mine in Northern Ontario with responsibility for accommodation, food and recreation facilities for up to 3000 employees. After some years he moved from the "Bush" to downtown Toronto where he opened a restaurant. He was at this time also involved in a business raising lumber that had sunk as the loggers floated the logs down the lakes and waterways. His company used divers and technical equipment to raise the logs from the lakes and sold them on to various sawmills. His hobbies at this time included boating on the Great Lakes, shooting and skiing and he was also an avid scuba diver. In 1963 returning to Ireland he was accepted at University College Dublin studying dentistry. His studies were later interrupted when he underwent a serious operation and spent a number of months in St. Vincent's Hospital, Dublin. He went to his brother Tom to recuperate and subsequently become employed with Tom's company where he worked in Gas Distribution and where brother Joe also worked. Pat and Joe developed an expertise and eventually started their own company, Kelly Brothers Civil Engineering, with head office and depot in Northampton, where they both purchased homes. The business was very successful and they expanded rapidly and widely. On a visit to Ireland Pat met Christine Walsh, a bank official, at an art exhibition of paintings by his sister Carmel O'Reilly and Christine's mother, Eileen Walsh, in Ennis. After a three-month whirlwind courtship they became engaged and were married in Cratloe, Co. Clare in 1970. They lived in Northampton until 1972 when they returned to Ireland and bought Hurdleston House and farm in Broadford, Co. Clare. Hurdleston House was a manor house of considerable historical and architectural interest, of interest particularly to the Kelly family because of its origins with Kelly ancestors prior to the Cromwellian invasion. Pat and Christine restored the house and gardens with meticulous care and attention and they also farmed the farm keeping mainly horses. Having restored Hurdleston they decided to become involved in restoring other older houses. The other restorations included Rockmount Lodge, Ennis, and Cloghala House and farm near Gowran, Co. Kilkenny. Christine also ran a successful gift shop and mail order business in High Street, Kilkenny. In the early 1990's they moved to Kilrickle, near Loughrea, Co. Galway, where, in semi-retirement, they now run a small garden center and garden design business, horticulture being one of Pat and Christine's great interests. Pat and Christine had three girls. Alison, born on the 9th April 1972, and Miriam, born on the 16th October 1974, both attended Loreto Convent in Kilkenny and University College Cork where they each received law degrees. Each qualified and was enrolled as solicitor with the Incorporated Law Society of Ireland in Trinity 1996 and Michaelmas 1998 respectively. Patricia, the youngest, born on the 16th June 1978, attended St. Bridget's Post-Primary School in Loughrea and then University College Galway where she obtained her corporate law degree in 1999 and will also shortly qualify as a solicitor.

[NI0334] John, the youngest of the Clonina Kelly children, was educated at Clohanbeg National School, and then as a boarder at St. Flannan's Secondary College, Ennis, where he was regarded as a very bright student. Upon completing his Leaving Certificate he helped on the home farm before going to England to work in construction for a short time. His brother-law-law, John Theordorson, a constituency agent for the Conservative Party, introduced him to many distinguished politicians including the young Sir John Eden with whom he became friends. He was accepted by Southampton University but decided instead to return to Clonina. John was a progressive farmer, mainly in dry stock, tillage and sheep. At a time of transition from horses to mechanized farming, he adapted to modern methods and changed to winter housing of stock and silage-making etc. Forestry and horticulture also played an important part, which he used to good advantage. Popular in the local community he helped stage many plays, in which he also acted, was part of an inter-county quiz team, organized charitable events and acting as Master of Ceremony often for bingo and other social events. John enjoys fishing, shooting and is a keen golfer being a member of Kilrush Golf Club, of which he has been captain, and he also plays bridge. On 27th June 1973, he married Philomena Killowry in Shannon. Phil was from a farming family near Kilmihil. She worked as a nurse at Ennis General Hospital and afterwards as a district nurse in the West Clare area. John and Phil had three children: Mary, born on the 15th November 1974, Patrick Joseph, born on the 22nd September 1977, and Ruth Anne, born on the 17th July 1985. All received their primary education at Clohanbeg National School. Mary attended Spanish Point Secondary School and third level at Waterford. She is now is employed with the Local Government in Shannon. Pat received his secondary education at Kilmihil and third level at Athenry Agricultural College and then spent time on the family farm.. He is now employed in the US in the Boston area. Ruth is at present attending secondary school in Kilmihil. John inherited the lands and property at Clonina, which is now about 120 Irish acres (about 150 American acres).

[NI0335] Joseph, known as Joe, left Clonina when he was 21 and he moved to England. He started working in London and his first job was for a company that made Pork Pies. Joe married Nancy in London and they had 6 children, Liam, Brian, Pat, Bridget, Sean and Clare. They moved to Northampton where Joe accepted a job working for the Macaness family, one of the biggest farming families in the County. Joe convinced his brother, Pat, to come to England and join him working with his other brother, Tom, at the RH McCullough civil engineering business. Thus began a period during the 1960's when the three brothers, Joe, Tom and Pat worked together and lived in Northampton. In 1967 Joe and Pat left this company and formed their own venture called Kelly Brothers, which Joe ran until his retirement. Joe later married Susan Bush, and they had Rebecca, when Joe was 53 years old. In recent years Joe and Sue, have run a country hotel called the Broomhill Hotel, near Northampton. Joe is an avid supporter of shooting and golf. Joe has helped lead the effort to establish the Kelly Clan Association and was appointed chairman in 1996.

[NI0336] Pat Mor's second son, Thomas "Tom Ban" O'Kelly, was born in Fortview in 1836. Tom survived the Great Famine and in 1868 at age 32 he married Susan Ryan from Kilmihil. Unfortunately Susan died just a few years later, and in 1872 at age 36 Tom re-married. His second marriage was to 25-year-old Bidelia Davoren, who was the son of John Davoren of Ballymurphy in the parish of Kilfenora. Tom and Bidelia had 8 children in the next 10 years. Three of the their boys had large families giving Tom and Bridget 18 grandchildren. The family line was secured. At age 62, while his eldest son, Patrick Michael was fighting the Boer War in South Africa, Thomas died. Tom Ban's father, Pat Mor, acquired Clonina from his cousin John O'Kelly, and gave the property to Tom before he died (possibly as a wedding gift in 1868). Clonina is still in the hands of his descendants today. Clonina House is located on the west side of Cahermurphy, on the north side of the Cree to Ennis road. Clonina was previously known by the Gaelic names, Clooneenagh or Clooneena. Clooneenagh in Gaelic means the 'little field.' It is situated in the barony of Moyarta, the civil parish of Kilmacduane. The Catholic parish of Kilmacduane (Cooraclare) corresponds to the civil parish. There was a twentieth century addition to the residence and a yard and utility building adjoin the South East. There was a gate lodge until around the 1950's. Piers O'Morony originally built the home around 1659. He married Margaret Creagh, a widow who died in 1706. His eldest son, Edward O'Morony, was a J.P. in the parish of Kilmacduane. (The Kilmacduane parish was eventually divided into the parish of Cooraclare and Kilmihil.) The Fitzharris and Stewart families owned Clooneenagh, prior to John O'Kelly obtaining the property around 1850 from the McMahon family. In 1855, John O'Kelly was living in the house and was farming the sixty adjoining acres and reasonably extensive demesne (domain). The demesne had many mature trees. According to the Land Valuation Books of Clooneenagh in 1916, Patrick Kelly was listed as the occupier of the House, Office and Land of Clooneenagh (Clonina House) to the tune of 138 Acres, 2 Roods and 37 Perches, with a valuation of 62 pounds and 15 shillings. In 1893, Tom and Bridget's oldest son, Patrick Michael, at the age of 18, left for the Boer War in South Africa much to his mother's distress. However, Patrick distinguished himself with honours and he eventually returned to Clonina to take over the farm. Catherine, who was their eldest daughter, died when she was in her teens. Margaret, who was known as Cecilia, married John O'Keefe from Killarney and died without children at the age of 77. Tommy was the second son and he helped run the farm while Patrick was away. At the age of 27 he married Catherine Killeen, whose family was from Clohanmore. Mary, known by her family as Auntie May, married John Culligan from Drumcliffe and died without children at the age of 89. John lived at Clonina until after 1901 and left for England where he worked in a post office until he died at the young age of 25. Their next son Dominick became an unbeaten heavyweight-boxing champion, and following his nose for adventure, he emigrated to Canada around 1913. All trace of him was lost in 1924. Mary, his wife moved to Perth, Australia, arranging for their only child, Michael to be raised by the Kelly family. Tom and Bridget's final child Bridget lived with her parents at Clonina and died in her mid twenties.

[NI0337] The 1901 Irish census shows Bridget Kelly (53), widow of Thomas Kelly (who died in 1898) was living in Clonina House with her son Tom (22), her niece Margaret Davoren (17) and three servants, Michael Davoren (27), Ellen McMahon (55) and Peter Tuohy (80). She was listed as a farmer and head of the family. By 1911 Tom had married and left the house and Dominick had returned. The 1911 census shows that Bridget (62) was living at Clonina House with her son Dominick (27) and her neice Margaret Davoren (now 26). In this census it shows that she had married 38 years previously and had 10 children, 5 of which were alive. The census also showed that another of her sons, Tommy, and his family were living in a neighboring home in the townland of Clonina. Bridget was known to be a beautiful woman.

[NI0340] Mary died without children in 1968. Her property in Drumcliffe went to her neice, Carmel. She was baptised on Sept 8th 1880 and sponsored by Andrew and Elizabeth Davoren.

[NI0341] The baptismal records of Cooraclare show Margaret Kelly of Thomas and Bidelia to have been baptised on July 12, 1877, and was sponsored by Tim Kelly and her Aunt, Lizzie Davoren. Thus Cecilia was probably christened as Margaret and used the name Cecilia. After marrying John O'Keefe Cecily moved to Paris, where she lived before seperating from her husband and returning to Ireland.

[NI0342] Catherine was baptised on May 9, 1974 and sponsored by Rev A. Newport and Catherine Newport.

[NI0343] John worked at a Post Office in London. He died when he was about 25 years old, possibly from TB.

[NI0344] Dominick was born in 1883 and was an adventurous and athletic individual. As a young man he became an unbeaten heavyweight boxing champion. Following his nose for adventure, he left home before his 18th birthday and headed for Canada, where he joined the Canadian Mounted Police. He returned briefly to Clonina by the time he was 28. On the outbreak of World War I in 1914, at age 31, Dominick joined the British Army and left for Europe, where he spent most of the time fighting in the trenches of Flanders. Following his completion of duty with the Canadian Expeditionary Force, Dominick emigrated to Canada and he made Vancouver, British Columbia, his base. He became a lumberjack and worked thoroughout Canada, United Stated and South America. Dominick became increasingly disenchanted with the political situtation in Canada. He loathed union agitators, and in 1920 he wrote to his mother indicating the possibility that he would leave the country to return to his family in Ireland "I'd beat it for the Old Country right away". Although he did leave Canada soon after, he actually emigrated to Chicago in the USA. He later went to Mexico and from there it is known that he spent time in Nicaragua and Honduras. All correspondance from him ceased in 1925 and he was presumed dead in 1925. After losing contact with Dominick, Mary, his wife moved to Perth, Australia, arranging for their only child, Michael to be raised by the Kelly family. Mary later married Mr. Campbell in Australia and had at least two children. Consistent with the above story, the 1901 cenus shows that Dominick (age 18) was not living in Clonina, however, the 1911 census showed that Dominick had returned and was living at Clonina with his mother and brother Tommy and family. Dominick must have married Mary Keane shortly after the census was taken, had their son Michael, and emigrated without their son.

[NI0346] Tadhg Mor and Mary had 16 children, Patrick being the first when his father was already 37 years old. The family lived in Fortview, near Cree, and about 10 miles from Ennis. Patrick was a tall man and was known by his friends and family as Pat Mor (Big Pat). When he was about 24 years old he married his first cousin Bridget Gibson, who was the daughter of Thomas Gibson of Ballyvoe, Ennis. Pat Mor and Bridget had 10 children, Patrick the eldest was born in 1832 and James the youngest was born in 1849. About the same year as his marriage, Pat Mor's uncle, the Reverand Father Patrick O'Kelly died leaving him property at Finure and the middle division of Glanmore. 19 years later his father died leaving him another generous inheritance. Through these inheritance and astute business decisions Pat Mor became a wealthy man, and at one time, he must have owned over 2000 acres of land. Pat Mor's success is even more remarkable considering that he had to suffer through the Great Famine, which engulfed County Clare between 1845 and 1851. This part of County Clare suffered particularly badly when the potato crop failed through a disease called blight. Already in 1844, before the Famine began, due to heavy winter rains, potatoes were rotting in storage and most of the population of the Ennis district was described as being 'in a state of dreadful destitution', with pauperism 'frightfully on the increase'. In October 1845 half the potato crop in the county was destroyed by the blight. By July 1846 the blight had returned for a second year, and in the Ennis area it was said to be everywhere: 'To a person traversing potato fields where the crop is much diseased, the progress of the putrefaction is at once made manifest by a most offensive odor arising from the stalks'. Christmas 1846 was a bleak time. The Ennis workhouse was full, but could only provide bread and milk for its inmates on Christmas Day. In late December there was the first great wave of starvation deaths in the district. It was reported that between September and December 1846, 70 people had died from starvation in the nearby parish of Kilmurry. The Kilmurry parish priest spoke of the 6,000 'yet breathing skeletons' in his parish, and it was reported that there were 'hundreds upon hundreds that were unable to crawl abroad.' In January 1847 nearly all the main roads of Clare had been uprooted to create work for public works schemes to employ the starving 'usefully', at a rate of 8d (8 pence) per day. 53,000 workers were employed on road-building projects in the county, which resembled a massive building site. This represented no less than 20% of the population of the county - and the figure rose to 70,000 (25%) later in the spring. When in March 1847 the government threatened to reduce the scale of the public works projects, which were the only means of sustenance that many had, Sir Lucius O'Brien, Baron of Inchiquin, wrote urgently on the eve of the reduction that if the threatened 20% reduction were effected 'there would be 1,200 starving men in Ennis and Newmarket'. The often absurd nature of these works in the Ennis area was commented on by local journalist John Knox: 'It is truly distressing to look upon great numbers of laborers employed day after day in cutting up good roads for the sake of removing little hillocks, many of which to our own knowledge are not at their highest point more than about two or three feet in altitude above the adjacent level, while at the same time, the land lying on both sides of these roads may be made to yield by proper cultivation double the amount of produce at present derivable from it.' Soup kitchens were established throughout Clare, but conditions were so bad in 1847 that crowds rushed many of the soup kitchens destroying the boilers. It seems that the soup kitchen symbolized all the accumulated hardships and humiliations that the people felt had been inflicted on them. In the summer of 1847 three million people throughout Ireland relied on the soup kitchen rations. By July 60% to 70% of the population of Clare were subsisting on soup kitchen rations alone, and the Ennis kitchen was distributing 7,000 rations daily. In 1848, with 400 patients in the County Clare fever hospital in Ennis, it was reported by one of the Poor Law Commissioners, a Captain Kennedy, that many people evicted in County Clare during famine destitution had taken refuge in 'bog dens', holes in the living bogs roofed over with sod. Kennedy's report was harrowing: 'Several of these wretched dens, which contained sick persons, were without light or air, and I was obliged to light a piece of bog fir to see where the sick lay, while many good substantial houses lay in ruins around them… The evicted are dazed, they don't know where to face, linger about localities for weeks or months burrowing in ditches or among the rafters of their former dwellings ... the poor are hunted off land, when perhaps they have never been more than five miles away.' In 1848 the potato crop continued to suffer. A letter written by county surveyor John Hill about the conditions in the Ennis area at this time was graphic: 'Those who are receiving outdoor relief are very much deteriorated in physical strength…their sufferings are greatly aggravated by the scarcity of fuel, and the ruinous state of their houses. The able-bodied are becoming mere skeletons, and the numbers of their class are rapidly diminishing by deaths ... all sectors of society are fast sinking beneath the pressure of distress, and the lower class of landholders are in very nearly the same condition. The next better class of landholders, up to recently still comparatively well-off (which may well have included some of the Kellys) are now diminishing fast, crushed under a triple burden of cess, rent and escalating poor law rate… Only one in four of the people are now attending mass for want of clothes. The chapels in the different parishes are crowded for the early masses, because the people are ashamed to appear among the respectably dressed at the later ones in the rags to which they are now reduced.' By December 1848, in the Poor Law Union of Ennistymon, the weekly death rate was a staggering 52 per 1,000 in the workhouse. More than half the deaths occurred within two months of admission, so it was clearly destitution and disease all around which was so devastating. There were serious social disturbances in the district through 1847 and 1848, such that 200 extra police were drafted in. By early 1849 when the worst of the Famine was over in County Clare, landlords started mass evictions of the penniless tenants who had survived but could not pay rent, which were estimated to be among the highest rental rates in Ireland. Those who were evicted often simply wandered the lanes. Nevertheless, despite the sufferings of the starving and sick, the authorities still kept law and order with a firm hand. In early 1848 a special judicial commission sat for a week in Ennis, dealing with a backlog of cases. Five death sentences were handed down, with many other sentences of imprisonment and transportation, mostly for assaults, stealing livestock, threats and other agrarian crimes. The ordinary spring assizes, a few weeks later, dealt with no less than 244 prisoners and 300 cases - this was so exceptional that even The Times in London reported it. The summer of 1849 was reported as being the 'deepest, grimmest part of the Famine in the Ennis area.' West Clare was riven by cholera, evictions and famine. The population in the parish of Kilmurry lbrickane dropped 40% from 10,747 in 1841 to only 7,172 in 1851. The 1,652 inhabited houses in 1841 were down to 1,142 in 1851. Every parish in the diocese of Killaloe suffered between 1845 and 1850 and the roofless huts that littered the countryside were a reminder of the many who had died or emigrated. In 1850 it seemed as if the people of Ireland had lost the will to live in their own land, as emigrants poured out of the country. As a result of the death from starvation and the accompanying diseases and the flight from Ireland, the population of Ireland dropped from over nine million to about four and a half million between 1850 and 1900. For over one hundred years, until the 1960s, emigration remained a constant factor in the life of the people, such as the Kellys, who lived in rural areas. Massive numbers of Kellys emigrated to the United States, Canada, Australia and Great Britain. Freed from the shackles that had cramped them at home, many of these Kelly emigrants prospered. Those that survived the long journeys and were able to find work, later sent the transportation fare to their relatives at home who soon followed them. Although the volume of emigration varied from time to time, it was always sufficient to maintain a steady decline in the rural population, and a dramatic increase in the number of Kellys worldwide. As a result the population of most parishes in the late 20th century, with the exception of the towns, dropped to less than 20% of what it was in 1846, and in some instances to nearer 10%. In 1850 and 1851, although the effects of hunger and disease were slowly abating in mid-Clare, evictions and poverty rose sharply. It was reported in 1851 that 'in all parts of Clare large farms were also being abandoned or surrendered to landlords by tenants or middlemen who were no longer able to withstand the pressures of rents and rates.' There was an unusual development too, which may well have affected the Kellys. In 1857 under the Encumbered Estates Act, the lands of the Marquess of Thomond in the county were sold off in relatively small parcels - to fetch higher prices. Unusually, the bulk of the buyers were the existing tenant farmers, who took out loans and struggled for years to repay them.

Somehow Patrick, Bridget and their children survived this dreadful period and continued to build their family. They built and lived in a house at Fortview, which was in the Townland of Cloughanbeg. Fortview is south of a minor road, almost two miles NNE of Cree. The family of Timmy Kelly currently inhabits Fortview. Although it was renovated in the 1960's, much of the original structure is still standing. Fortview was used as refuge for the Fenian, Danny O'Leary. According to Hugh Weir, 'the representatives of Patrick Kelly of Fortview owned 1031 acres with a rateable value of 210 pounds.' Fortview is a 19th century, one-floor, five-bay house, with a central porch-protected front door, facing south towards Cree village. Pat Mor acquired Clohaninchy House in Kilmurry, lbrickane, and was known to live in it at some time (possibly while he was building Fortview). The house and the 65-acre farm were certainly in his possession in 1855. Pat Mor must have left Clohaninchy to his herdsman, Mr. Downes, whose daughter married Patrick Clancy in 1943. From then on the house became uninhabited and was eventually demolished. The new larger house, built by Mr. Clancy's daughter and son-in-law now stands on the site of the original house. There was reputedly a tunnel linking the old house to Tromeroe Castle. Clohaninchy is located close by the sea, just over one mile SW of the Kilmurry Church. Pat Mor died at age 67, apparently of a heart attack after visiting a neighbor, the Marinans of Clohanmore near Fortview. The obituary for Pat Mor was printed in The Clare Journal on 23 April, 1873. In 1864 Pat Mor built a significant burial crypt for his family in the cemetery of the church in Kilmurry, near Quilty, Co. Clare. This area is one of the beautiful and tranquil in Clare. He and many other family members are buried in this crypt. The photo below was taken in 1992, and as can be seen the crypt is still in reasonable condition. Patrick obtained lands and property for all of his family. According to the land records of 1855 these houses and lands included the following: Clohaninchy, in which he lived himself and which became the property of his herdsman, Mr. Downes; Clonina, which he obtained from his cousin John O'Kelly, for his second son, Tom Ban; Kilglassy House, near Ennis, which he obtained for his son, Michael;Kilmoraun, which he obtained for his son, John; Fortview, which he left to his son, William; Finure, which he obtained from The Priest Kelly for his son, James; Tullagh Park; Aruane, which he obtained for his bachelor son, Timmy. Pat Mor left nothing to his oldest son, Patrick Joseph, who had left Ireland for Jamaica many years before. As Pat Mor died intestate, the children of Patrick Joseph returned to Ireland to contest the distribution of Pat Mor's wealth. In this settlement with Bridget Gibson they returned to Jamaica with over 2000 pounds, a considerable sum in those days.

[NI0347] Patrick Joseph was a medical doctor (M.D. F.R.C.S.) and an army surgeon. He studied at Trinity College, Dublin. His first marriage was to Mary Frost, daughter of a Medical Doctor from Newmarket-on-Fergus. Patrick received his practice. His wife died after just 9 months and Patrick remarried. He had children with his second wife, Carey Lawson, who was the daughter and heiress of the Hon. George Lawson, who was the custos (Governor) for St. James, Jamaica. His children returned to Ireland to contest the distribution of Pat Mor's wealth. In this settlement with Bridget Gibson they returned to Jamaica with over 2000 pounds, a considerable sum in those days.

[NI0350] Michael was given the Kilglassy lands by his father Pat Mor Kelly. In 1855 the property was shown as leased to Patrick Kelly. All these Kellys were very tall men, and some of them joined the army. See the story of his son Michael. The Kilglassy House is in the townland of Kilglassy, Darragh, in the Parish of Killone. It is located at the end of a long drive SE of Kilrush Road, about 10 miles SW of Ennis. It is still standing and inhabited. It is two-floor, three-bay residence, with cut stone steps leading to a central arched and recessed front door. The house faces south-east.

[NI0351] John was givenKilmoraun House by Pat Mor.Kilmoraun is located inKilmoraun, Killon. It is located at the end of a long drive west of the Kilrush road, about 7 miles SW of Ennis.Kilmoraun is a most interesting 17th century, two-floor, three-bay, stone and brick, gable-ended house, with chimney stacks in each gable. It has a central front door protected by a lean-to-porch which incorporates a large semi-circular headed window in the front. The house faces south. It was originally owned by the Daxon family and later passed on to other families. John died in 1901 and his will was proved on 8 October 1902. One of his descendants lives in Cork and has a child, whose name is Aisling and was born about 1980.

[NI0356] The third son of Michael Kelly and Margaret McMahon, Timothy Kelly, was born in 1769 in Leitrim, County Clare. He was known as Thady or Tadhg Mor (Big Tim). When he was in his early 30's he married Mary O'Keefe from Querrin, Co. Clare and they had two children; Pat Mor and Margaret. Mary died soon after Margaret was born, and a few years later, in 1817 at age 48, Timothy re-married to Mary Shannon, who was a sprightly 22 year old from Mullagh. This was a very prolific marriage and they had 14 children during the next 21 years, giving him 16 children in all. Shortly after the birth of his second child with Mary Shannon, Timothy's father, Michael, died, leaving Timothy a large inheritance. A few years later, in 1830, Timothy's famous brother, Reverand Father Patrick O'Kelly, also died and left him another substantial inheritance. Patrick left him all of the lands in Cree, and the division of lands in Leitrim. He was also left the west division of lands at Glanmore, the house in Kilrush and the furniture and estates in Cragg. Timothy lived mostly in Leitrim House in Kilmihil, and at least three generations of the Kelly family have lived in Leitrim House since. Father Patrick also lived there before moving to Cloonreddan. The famous ecclesiastic, Father Timothy Kelly, who was the second cousin once removed of Thady, lived out his retirement in Leitrim Lodge and was said to be responsible for building the part, which now stands. The area around Leitrim was dry, and the only stream in it passed through the Leitrim estate. A six-foot wall on part of the estate enclosed a deer park. Leitrim is located north of a minor road, about 7 miles WNW of Kilmihil. Leitrim House is a most interesting, irregular house. The house was a one and a half-floor, two-bay, hip-hoofed house, facing south from an eminence. The minute second floor windows are just under the eaves. Only two large windows face south over a garden, and the entrance is through a fanlit front door, to an angled section linking the standing portion with an almost demolished portion in the west. An earlier part of the house was a one-floor, five-bay, thatched, gable-ended house, with a central front door and chimneystacks in each gable. The house was approached by a drive from the SSE, and a one-floor, gable-ended gate lodge, of three bays with a central front door, stood across the road from the entrance. Tadhg Mor Kelly died on 22 February, 1849 age 80 years old and he was buried at Kilmihil. His first will was dated 11 January 1844 and his second will was dated 29 January 1849. Neither was proved but the wills were obviously not contested. In his first will Thady entertained the request of his brother, Patrick, to pass on the farms and lands in Creagh and the division of lands at Leitrim, and the western division of lands at Glanmore to Thady's sons of his second marriage. Thady did so by leaving, in four equal shares, the lands at Cree to his first four sons by his second marriage, i.e. 'James, the eldest, Timothy the second, Mathew the third and Richard the fourth'. However, as James married in 1845 Thady deeded him a specific portion of these lands and changed his will to ensure no litigation between the brothers. He specifically deeded James: 'The portion of the said lands of Creagh called upon and known by the name Chapel division, and containing 62 acres...and 11 perches arable lands and seven acres and 16 perches of bog...now in the possession of James. I will unto my son, Richard, the portion of the lands known as the East division...containing 44 acres, and 21 perches of arable land and 15 acres and 28 perches of bog. I will unto my son, Matt, that part of said lands of Creagh called and known as the south division, west of the chapel, and containing 64 acres...and 35 perches arable land, 18 acres…of bog, and I will unto my son, Tim Kelly the portion of the said lands of Creagh called and known as the north division, west of the chapel...containing 65 acres...and 35 perches of arable land and 18 acres of bog'. Thady left the west division of the lands at Glanmore, which had been devised to him by Patrick, to his son Michael Kelly. He left the lands at Leitrim that had been devised to him by Patrick, to his son William Kelly. Thady left all other belongings to his second wife, Mary. He specifically left the house in Kilrush to his wife, Mary, and the farms and land of Cragg and Cloughanbeg to Mary, as 'a provision for herself and of our four daughters'. Timothy appointed his son-in-laws, Michael Killeen (husband of his eldest daughter, Margaret) and Francis O'Donnell (husband of the eldest daughter, Elizabeth, from his second marriage), the executors of his will.

[NI0358] Magaret's father Thady appointed his son-in-laws, Michael Killeen, husband of Margaret, who was his eldest daughter from his first marriage) and Francis O'Donnell (husband of the eldest daughter, Elizabeth, from his second marriage), the executors of his will.

[NI0359] Mary Shannon's relationship in this record is very perculiar. As shown here she was the daughter of Timothy Shannon and the second husband of Thady, and had 14 of his children. Either a grand-daughter or possibly another (unknown) daughter of Timothy Shanon married Timothy Kelly from Clonneddan and had 4 of his children. It appears that they were half sisters, but this is worth investigating.

[NI0360] Creagh House in Cree was built for James Kelly on the occassion of his marriage to Margaret Kenny of Freagh Castle. In 1855 he farmed the 117 acre estate. Six generations of the Kelly family have lived there since. It is located to the south of the main Cree to Ennis Road, about 1 mile East of Cree. It is a 19th century, two-floor, three bay house, with a central front door, facing south with a lower two-floor return. There is an orchard to the east. A new house has been erected in front of the earlier one. James's father, Thady, left his lands at Cree in four equal shares to his first four sons by his second marriage, i.e. "James, the eldest, Timothy the second, Mathew the third and Richard the fourth". However, as James married in 1845 Thady deeded him a specific portion of these lands and changed his will to ensure on ligitation between the brothers. He specifically deeded James "the portion of the said lands of Creagh called upon and known by the name Chapel division, and containing 62 acres...and 11 perches arable lands and seven acres and 16 perches of bog...now in the possession of James.

[NI0361] Timothy's father, Thady, left a portion of his lands at Cree to Timothy. " I will unto my son, Tim Kelly the portion of the said lands of Creagh called and known as the north division, west of the chapel...containing 65 acres...and 35 perches of arable land and 18 acres of bog". This is known as Cree Cottage. Timothy died on 18 March 1868 and his will was proven on 9 June 1882.

[NI0362] Stephen and Mathew were fraternal twins. Stephen died as a child.

[NI0363] Mathew and Stephan were fraternal twins. Mathew was a merchant. Mathew's father left him "that part of said lands of Creagh called and known as the south division, west of the chapel, and containing 64 acres...and 35 perches arable land, 18 acres..of bog...".

[NI0364] Richard's father, Thady, willed to him the portion of the lands known as the East division of Leitrim...containing 44 acres, and 21 perches of arable land and 15 acres and 28 perches of bog. Richard emigrated to Australia.

[NI0365] Michael was given Cragg House in Coolmeen, near Kilrush, by his father Timothy on the occassion of his marriage to Bridget Hennessey. Cragg House is on the north side of the Kilrush to Ennis Road, about 3 miles WSW of Lough Achryane. It is still standing and inhabited. It is a 19th century, one-floor, five-bay, hip-roofed house, with a central fanlit front door, facing south, with a yard adjoining the rear. The farm is approximately 300 acres. There is a mass rock behind the house. The property is currently owned by the Keating family. Michael's father, Thady, left him the west division of the lands at Glanmore, which had been devised to him by Patrick.

[NI0366] William inherited the lands of Leitrim from his father, Thady.

[NI0367] Elizabeth was the eldest daughter of Thady from his second marriage to Mary Shannon. Thady appointed his son-in-law, Francis O'Donnell, who was husband of Elizabeth as a joint executor of his will. Thady also left the farms and land of Cragg and Clohanebeg to Elizabeth's mother, Mary, as "a provision for herself and of our four daughters".

[NI0374] Tadgh an Oir O'Kelly must have had several children, because his eldest son, Michael, inherited just some of the riches of his father. Under the tough penal laws, which lasted for another 100 years, Catholics were forbidden to acquire land freehold, to purchase land from Protestants or to lease the land for more than 31 years. Catholics were also forbidden to pass their land onto their eldest sons exclusively, and any riches they were able to accumulate had to be divided equally among all their sons. This was planned to eventually lead to the impoverishment of rich Catholic families. Even so the Kellys flourished and we know that from this branch of the family descend the Kellys of Clonina, Leitrim, Finure, Cloonreddan, Fortview, Crag and Broomehill. Although little is known about Timothy's other children, his second son, Michael, married and carried the family line. Michael married Margaret McMahon, whose family was from Dromin, near Miltown Malbay. Between 1758 and 1780 Michael and Margaret had six children, the eldest being the Reverand Father Patrick O'Kelly.

[NI0375] Margaret's obituary was printed in the Clare Journal on 28 February 1822.

[NI0376] For forty years the Reverand Father Patrick O'Kelly was the parish priest of the then united parishes of Kilmacduane (Cooraclare) and Kilmihil. Patrick was educated at the Irish college in Paris, at which many of the Killaloe priests received their education in penal times. At this time, Catholic landowners were European in outlook and often sent their sons to European schools for a formal education. Patrick left France at the beginning of the French revolution and he returned to his native, Clare. Patrick was lucky to survive another of the more drastic penal laws, which was designed to wipe out Catholicism. Priests were outlawed and hunted like wild animals with substantial rewards being given to successful priest hunters. Despite these laws most of the Catholics held fast to their religion. Patrick must have been hidden by his friends and Masses heard in secluded areas. It was about 1790 when Father Patrick was appointed parish Priest of the united parishes of Kilmacduane and Kilmihil. Initially he lived at Leitrim House, which was known as Kelly's Grove. Later he moved to Cloonreddan and finally in old age he moved to Kilrush. It may have been he who expanded the house at Leitrim by building a two-floor slated house onto the existing thatched house. By the early 1800's Father O'Kelly had inherited many of the O'Kelly farms. These he let to various members of his family, who in turn sublet them to tenants. Father O'Kelly's unusual position of extensive landlord on the one hand and parish Priest of his people, many of whom who were his tenants, brought him into frequent conflict with the local Protestant ascendancy. Known simply as the Priest O'Kelly he was not afraid to speak out against the injustices against the Catholics of the time. Patrick died on January 31, 1830 and in St. Mary's Church, Cree, a simple brass memorial records his death. In his will, dated 5 December 1826, amended on 18 June 1829, and proved on 25 February 1831, Patrick left his riches to his siblings and their children. He appointed his nephew, John Kelly of Kilrush, and his brother, Thady Kelly, as the executors of his will. In a codicil to his will, Patrick revoked the appointment of Thady Kelly and John Kelly as the executors and replaced them with Thomas Gibson, his brother-in-law and another nephew, John Kelly. Father Patrick left his lands to his brothers and nephews, it being his 'will and intention that said lands remain in the family.' It is remarkable that now, almost 200 years later, Father O'Kelly's descendants still own and live in these farms and houses; Clonina, Leitrim and Finure. The value of his estate passing on his death was 6,750 pounds, a staggering figure not only for 1830 but also particularly for a pre-Emancipation Catholic Priest, living in penal times. In his will he bequeathed 200 pounds to: 'My nephews and nieces, the sons and daughters of my brother, Thady Kelly, and my sisters Honora McMahon, Bridget Gibson and Margaret Kelly, who shall be alive and unmarried at the time of my death.' Patrick also left his brother Thady, all the farms and lands in Cree and the division of the lands at Leitrim (30 acres), which Thady held for Patrick; the west division of the lands at Glanmore, at the time herded by Simon McNamara, to the sons of Thady's second marriage with Mary Shannon; Clonina and the woods at Clonina to his nephew John Kelly (in the 1825 Griffith's valuation, Clonina was shown to be 63 acres with a tithe value of 3 pounds 15 shillings and a half pence, and owned by Rev O'Kelly); the remainder of Leitrim, partly in Patrick's possession, and partly let to tenants, to John Kelly; the northwest division of Glanmore, which was herded by Michael Walsh, to John Kelly; the middle division of Glanmore and the East division of Finure to Patrick (Pat Mor) Kelly; Ballydooneen to his nephew Morty McMahon; Balloughera and Ballylean to his sister Honora McMahon and her son (his nephew) Terry McMahon; Clohaninchy to Margaret Kelly 'free from the control and meddling of her husband'; Lisseynealan to his nephew Thady Kelly; 200 pounds to Mary McMahon, wife of Michael Kelly, his nephew; the house in Kilrush and the furniture and all estates in Cragg to Thady Kelly. In a codicil to his will, Patrick revoked the sum of 200 pounds initially bequeathed to the children of Margaret Kelly and James Kelly of Cree Bridge. He also revoked the sum of 200 bequeathed to his nephews, Peter Gibson and Pat Gibson, and directed that the executors call in the monies owed to him by these two nephews. Nieces and nephews were still being born in the period between Patrick's will, his death and the proving of the will. As such some of these took a case against the executor, Mr. Gibson, for not paying them the 200 pounds. Patrick left the remainder of his enormous estate to the family. 'As to all the rest and residue of my property, of every nature and kind whatsoever not herein before bequeathed and disposed of, I leave and bequeath the same, equally between my nephews, John Kelly and Thady Kelly, and the children of my brother Thady Kelly, i.e. Patrick Kelly, James Kelly, Thady Kelly, Mathew Kelly, Richard Kelly, Elizabeth Kelly and Bridget Kelly, whom I appoint my residuary legatees.' Although not mentioned in the wills, it would appear that Patrick left Freagh Castle to Mary O'Kelly, his first cousin, and wife of Mathias Kenny. By one of the codicils to his will, Father Patrick also left a sum of 200 pounds to be laid out by the executors to build a chapel at Cree Bridge. He had, however, commenced building the church prior to his death on 31 January 1830, age 72. The Clare Journal records that his body was to be 'interred in the new chapel at Creagh, lately built by him at his own private expense'.

[NI0377] James's will was proved on 6 June 1811.

[NI0378] Honoria was left 200 pounds by her brother Father Patrick. She was also left 240 acres by him.

[NI0379] Bridget married Thomas Gibson III, the son of Thomas Gibson II. Bridget was left 200 pounds by her brother, Father Patrick.

[NI0380] Margaret was left Clohaninchy and 200 pounds by her brother Father Patrick. Judging by the wording in Patrick's will there were problems in the married life of Margaret and James. The specific wording was "I give Clohaninchy at 1 guinea per acre free from the control and meddling of her husband and not to be subject to his debts after her death".

[NI0381] At least two branches of the Kelly family settled into west Clare and became related, if they were not already, through the marriage to daughters of Edmond Mahon. Timothy O'Kelly, who was born in the last quarter of the 17th century, was known as Tadhg an Oir O'Kelly (Gaelic for Timothy of the gold), because he was reputed to be the wealthiest Catholic landowner in all of Munster, Ireland. Despite the tough penal laws Tadhg an Oir had amassed a large fortune and established himself as effective leasehold owner of large tracts of land from Mullagh to Kilmihil in County Clare. It is believed that this branch of the O'Kelly family came to West Clare from County Galway following the Jacobite defeat at Aughrim in 1691, fought in the heart of O'Kelly territory. They settled in the area called Cloughanbeg West, which is a beautiful settlement a few miles from Cree, in County Clare. It is believed that most of Timothy O'Kelly's family changed their name to Kelly, in the aftermath of the Battle of Aughrim. Timothy and Honora had at least two children, Michael and Patrick.

Edmond Mahon, who was born in the middle of the 17th century, had seven daughters who were known as the Seven Sisters. Three of these have a very important role in the Kelly family. Honoria married Timothy O'Kelly of Cloughanbeg and Mary married Timothy Kelly of Craggaknock. A third daughter, Catherine married Hugh Kenny, and their ancestors married a Craggaknock Kelly, creating the Kelly-Kenny branch. Edmond's third daughter, Mary, married Timothy Kelly of Craggaknock, who was the son of Patrick O'Kelly, a Captain in the Jacobite forces, who was slain at the Battle of Aughrim in 1691. It is believed that Patrick's first wife was a sister in law of the then Lord Clare, who introduced this branch of the Kelly family into Clare from Hy-Maine. It was through his second wife, Elizabeth Reid that Timothy Kelly of Craggaknock was born.

[NI0384] Honoria Mahon was the second daughter of Edmond Mahon, by his second wife, Margaret Hogan.

[NI0385] James was well educated and well travelled. He was known as a friendly and jolly man. He spoke fluent French. He graduated from a private Jesuit college on Sexton Street, Limerick. He fought both politically and militarily for the Irish republic and was imprisioned by the British after the Easter Rising in 1916, but was released shortly afterwards. He travelled extensively. He went to Australia as a young lad. The first world war broke out just prior to his return. He travelled back on the second of three boats from Australia to Ireland. The first and third boats were sunk by the Germans, but his got through. He was a lucky man. In addition to helping his wife, Emma, run the farm, the pub and the shop he was also in the land commission. He died in the County Hospital in Ennis, at age 71, of arterio-sclerosis of the aorta, which is a heart attack due to a massive tightening of the arteries.

[NI0386] Emeline O'Brien was born in Broadford on October 7th 1894, and baptised in the Diocese of Killaloe, on 9th October 1894. She was sponsored by P. Ryan and A. J. Cunningham. Emma was educated at an exclusive college, Roscrae College, in Tipperary. Emma's family were republicans. They owned a very popular pub in Broadford called O'Brien's Pub, later to be called Vaughan's and more recently the River Valley Lounge. During the war of independance the pub was frequented by the armies of the British and also the Irish. The Black and Tans enjoyed the pub and drank in the main bar downstairs. Unknown to them the IRA boys drank upstairs. Emma's job was to keep lookout and serve them drinks. She always carried a revolver. Emma was a member of the Cumman na Bhin (pronounced cumana-marn) "Club of the Women". This organization supported the Republican movement and was the womens section of the IRA. Emma was known to be a beautiful women with blue eyes and black hair.

[NI0389]

[NI0399] Thomas inherited the property at Drummina from his father, Patrick, and his family have lived there ever since. Amongst the families descended from Thomas are the Clonina Kelly's through his daughter, Bridget. This branch of the Kelly family are known as the East Clare Kelly's. Drummina, was located in the townland of Dysert O'Dea, which comes from the Gaelic 'Doisert', meaning 'A wild country destitute of inhabitants'. In the 1830s the Ordnance Survey undertook a detailed survey to map the whole of Ireland. This survey described 2,176 townlands in County Clare. All of them had originally Gaelic names, like Doisert. This has been remarked upon: 'The county being almost entirely surrounded by water and by mountains, has been so isolated and so exempt from foreign influences that there is less difficulty in making out the meaning of its place names than those of any other part of Ireland. Its people, too, long retained the use of their native tongue, and spoke almost nothing but Irish down to our own times (1890s).. All the place names of Clare are unmistakably Celtic, thus proving that whatever race or people, whether Fomorians, Tuatha de Danaans, Firbolgs or Milesians inhabited the territory of Thomond, they were Gadhaels and spoke the same tongue as that used by the people today .. It is evident that the county, in ancient times, was very extensively covered with woods and shrubberies. It also appears certain that the area under cultivation was surprisingly small. Our forefathers appear to have lived in almost absolute idleness, feeding principally on meat, and cultivating the least possible extent of land.'

[NI0406] Timothy was a minor in 1811 when his Father died. He married ElizabethShannon. All four of their children emigrated to the USA.

[NI0407] The Reverand Patrick O'Kelly, left his nephew, John Kelly, the properties at Clonina, the woods at Clonina, some part of Leitrim and the northwest division of Glanmore (which at the time was herded by Michael Walsh for rent). In his will proved February 5th, 1856 John Kelly had by now changed his name to John O'Kelly and he held lands amounting to over 2000 acres. John's first wife, Grace O'Brien died without children. John remarried to Maria Agnes Cullinan of Harmony House, Ennis, and had the children of this marriage. In the 1855 Griffith's Primary Vaulation of Lands and Tenements it was shown that John O'Kelly was the occupier of the 62 acre Clonina tenement (house, office, gate lodge and land) in the Clonina townland (30 pound valuation). It shows that the lessor was John V. Steward (maybe a protestant overseeor). It also shows that Stephen Kelly and Timothy Kelly were joint occupiers of a 72 acre tenement in Clonina. I have listed Stephan and Timothy as children of John and Maria but I have not proved this. John O'Kelly sold the lands and house at Clonina to his first cousin Pat Mor Kelly, who bought them for his son Tom Ban kelly.

[NI0409] James took his mother's maiden name, Shannon, as his surname, on his arrival in the USA.

[NI0414] John became a customs officer, and he died early in 1900, leaving three children who were orphaned at an early age. The children lived for a period at Dunmore. When Patrick was of age he returned to Mullagh to run the family farm. Delia remained in Dumore to assist in the caring for the young children of Michael and Brigid Crawley, after the untimely death of Brigid. When the young Frawleys were old enough Delia left Dunmore and went to another branch of the family, where she performed a similar service.

[NI0415] Will proved 30 July, 1863.

[NI0420] The 1911 Irish census showed that John Kelly was alive and living in Clonina with his wife, Mary, his mother Mary and four children, Michael, Mary, Daniel and Margaret.

[NI0422] May have been known as Michael Jack.

[NI0429] Edmond had seven daughters who were known as the Seven Sisters. Three of these have a very important role in the Kelly family. Honoria married Timothy O'Kelly of Claughanbeg and Mary married Timothy Kelly of Craggaknock. A third daughter,Catherine married Hugh Kenny, thereby starting another major line in the family tree, the Kenny and Kelly-Kenny branch. Edmond's second daughter, Honoria, married Timothy O'Kelly of Claughanbeg, also known as Tadgh an Oir (Timothy of the gold) O'Kelly, because he was reputed to be the wealthiest Catholic landowner in all of Munster. Despite the tough penal laws Tadgh an Oir had amassed a large fortune and established himself as effective leashold owner of large tracts of land from Mullagh to Kilmihil. It is believed that this branch of the O'Kelly family came to West Clare from County Galway following the Jacobite defeat at Aughrim in 1691, fought in the heart of Ui Maine; O'Kelly territory. Edmond's third daughter, Mary, married Timothy Kelly of Craggaknock, who was the son of Patrick Kelly, who was a Captain in the Irish Army, and was slain at the Battle of Aughrim in 1691. It is believed that Patrick's first wife, Miss Plunket, was a sister in law of the then Lord Clare, and it was Lord Clare who introduced this branch of the Kelly family into Clare, also from Galway. It was through his second wife, Elizabeth Reid, that Timothy Kelly of Craggaknock was born.

[NI0433] Patrick Cullinan lived in Harmony House. He paid eighteen pounds per annum for the house, offices, yard and garden in 1855. His family originated from the south Galway area. Harmony House is in the townland of Lifford and the Parish of Drumcliffe. It faces over the River Fergus to the south of Harmony Row's east end. It is asn irregular, three-floor, three-bay, gable-ended housse, with chimney stacks in each gable, facing south-east over the River. There is a two-floor return with a tall bay window facing over the bridge. It is still standing and inhabited with a well-kept garden.

[NI0434] In 1878, Harmony House was the residence of Patrick Maxwell Cullinan Esq, M.B., J.P., who owned 966 acres of land in County Clare.

[NI0437] The Gibsons had been Protestants but joined the Roman Catholic church in the later half of the 18th century. Thomas owed Reverand Patrick O'Kelly money, but was acquited this debt in O'Kelly's will of 1829. Thomas inherited Kilballyowen; Clorina House and Ballyvoe.

[NI0439] Michael Killeen (of Molusca) was elected as guardian in the Kilrush Union representing Cloonadrum in 1852, 1854 and 1870.

[NI0441] Under the will of his Maternal Grandfather, Dermot Owen took the additional name of Lawson, therby becoming Dermot Owen Kelly-Lawson. Dermot and his sister, Ena, returned to Ireland during the entitlement period, after Pat Mor's death in 1867, to dispute the settlement of his estate. In the resulting negotiations they received the sum of 2000 pounds from Bridget Gibson, on behalf of her husband, Pat Mor Kelly.

[NI0442] George was a Second Lieutenant RGA. He was killed at Typres in August 1917.

[NI0443] Dermot was a Second Lieutenant in the 3rd Dragon Guards during the second world war.

[NI0446] Georgina married her cousin, Charles McFarlane. She received a big inheritance from her Grandmother, Bridget Gibson, on behalf of her husband, Pat Mor Kelly, who had died intestate.

[NI0448] M.B. FRCSE

[NI0449] Charles McFarlane was a cousin of Georgina.

[NI0451] Custos for St. James, Jamaica, British West Indies.

[NI0454] John had two grandchildren that are not shown in this report, that were cousins of Patrick Michael Kelly. Their names are Nora and Delia. They were drowned in the S.S. Leinster, which was sunk by the Germas in the war in October 1918, when they were in their 20's. It is believed that Delia was short for Bidelia and she had a relationship of some sort with Patrick Michael. My father gave me a ring of his father's that was from Clareen House, Ennis, which we believe was given to him as a wedding present by Delia.

[NI0459] James and his sister Violet, went to live with their Aunt, Mrs May Cullignan at Drumcliff House, Ennis. Mrs Culligan had no children of her own. He became a wireless operator with the 78th squadron of the British Air Force during WWII. He rose to the position of Sergeant and was lost over the North Atlantic on September 14th 1940. His name is included on thr Air Force Memorial at Biggin Hill, Kent, England.

[NI0460] Violet may have been born in 1912. Violet and her brother James went to live with their Aunt Mrs. May Culligan at Drumcliff House, Ennis, Co. Clare.

[NI0461] Major Dominick Kelly was born in Clonina House in Cree in April 1915. He went to the elementary school of Cloughanbeg until he was nine years old. Shortly after Irish independence in 1924 he and his brother Tom were taken to France to stay with his aunt, Margaret Mary Cecilia O'Keefe. His aunt, known as Cissie, was the governess to the family of the Duc de Mass, who lived on the Champs Elysees. According to Dominick it was hard to imagine a scene further from the countryside of Clonina, with the servants and best of everything lifestyle in Paris. It did not take him long to learn to speak perfect French and Dominick completed his education in Paris. It was here that he became an accomplished athlete, achieving high levels in boxing, wrestling and soccer, and it was in this sport that he excelled playing for the Parisian youth championship team. He also excelled academically obtaining a Diplome de Fin d'Etudes, Brevet d'Enseignment Primaire Superior, which was a teaching degree, from Paris University. He spoke English and French fluently and German and Flemish very well. Dominick became a secondary school teacher in Paris from 1934-1937 and he continued his outstanding soccer career, playing for the professional Red Star team in Paris. Dominick decided teaching wasn't for hims and his spirit of adventure took him to London on 1938 where he joined the London Metropolitan Police. He continued playing soccer and he played for the successful London Police team. In was while he was on the beat in London that he met his future wife, Zizi. When the second world war broke out in 1939, Dominick joined the British Army. Although this was a war in which his native country, Ireland, remained neutral, Dominick wanted to be part of the Allied forces. Because of his language skills, he was transferred to the Special Operations Executive. In 1943 he was parachuted behind into occupied France, and operating undercover he set up an evacuation line from Brussels to Madrid. He remained behind enemy lines for several years organising airdrops of guns and amunition. During his very distinguished and secret career in the army he achieved the rank of Major and received many distinctions. He was mentioned in dispatched by the British, by the Belgian Secret Army and by the French Forces of the Interior (FFI). He was awarded the Knight of the Order of Leopold, the Croix De Guerre Avec Tour by the Belgium Government, and the Franco-British medal of Courage. While he was accomplishing all this he still found time to marry Zizi in 1943 in London. After the war he was transferred to Germany where he became the British Military Government Prosecutor for the Allied administration in Germany, at Dortmund in 1945 and 1946, with responsibility for prosecuting war criminals. He was demobilised in 1949 and Dominick and Zizi settled in Brussels, Belgium. An unknown hero of the war, Dominick's military ventures were of fascinating interest and in 1954 he had his life story published in the Engligh national newspaper, 'The People'. This was shortly after he had been tried and acquitted for espionage in Belgium. After retiring form the Army, Dominick worked for a Belgian investment bank for several years, beofre embarking an a career in business, working for the Brussels Corporation, the Solvay Group, Malcolm Pugh and DSA General Products. Between 1971 and 1981 Dominick owned his own manufacturing business producing caravans and mobile homes until he finally retired in 1981. He now lives in a suburb of Brussels and he enjoys reading, music, gardening, traveling and drinking fine wines. Domincik was very proud of his family and loves the vistis of his grandchildren. "Sometimes when I look at them I see again that barefoot little boy back in Clonina setting out for Paris and life's great adventure."

[NI0462] Thomas of 22 Mount Road, Wimbledon Park, London SW19, England and Mr Dominick Kelly, now of Rue Willem Kuhnen 69, Tehacrbuth, 1030, Brussells, went to live with their Aunt, Cecelia (Cissie) O'Keefe of Boulogne, France.

[NI0463] John was the Postmaster of Killarney.

[NI0468] Flan was the third county registrar in Co. Clare. He was the returning officer in the elections. He was also the under-sheriff for County Clare. In this capacity he was responsible for ensuring that court orders were carried out.

[NI0473] Susan was the illegitimate daughter of Georgette (Sally) Wisher, of Hampstead, London, and Uffa Fax, a universally known sailor from the Isle of Wight. She met Joe in Sudbury, Suffolk and they went on to live first in the Old Posting House in Chapel Brampton, Northamptonshire, until moving to Broomhill in Spratton, Northamptonshire in June 1984.

[NI0474] Fred was a geneologist and spent many years visiting family members worldwide.

[NI0480] In 1902, during the the visit of King Edward, Paddy Kelly as chosen as one of the four body guards representing Munster.

[NI0481] Frederick was accidentally killed.

[NI0493] Norah was baptised with the name Honora but was known as Norah.

[NI0497] Jackie lived with his uncle, John Kelly, before his mother died in 1895. He went to school in Inch, near Ennis, and lived inKilmoraun. He then returned home, and studied at the Mullagh school.

[NI0498] Timothy Kelly, who was known as Old Timmy, inherited Fortview from McMahon who died without children. Timmy died in 1992 without children at the age of 100. He left the house and lands at Fortview, to his nephew, Timothy Kelly, Young Timmy, who still lives there today with his family.

[NI0499] Catherine's Mother died when she was one year old. As such she was raised by her Grandmother, Mary Anne Kelly O'Donnell, and inherited the family farm. Check her death date - 1960 or 1984?

[NI0503] Thomas Blackall was in possession of Kildimo Cottage in 1855. It was inherited from the Keanes in tehmid 19th century through intermarriage. Thomas owned this 99 acre estate in 1855, and Henry Blackall had a house on the 16 acre property nearby. Kildimo is located in Lisdeen, off aminor road, about 6 miles ENE of Kilkee. It is still standing and inhabited. It is a one-floor, five bay, gable-ended house, facing south-east over Poulnasherry Bay and the River Shannon. A longish drive approaches from the west south-west.

[NI0504] Margaret was the daughter of Mathias Kenny, who obtained an interest in Freagh Castle through his wife, Mary O'Kelly, who received the property as an inheritence from Rev. Patrick O'Kelly after his death in 1830.

[NI0505] Mathias's interest in Freagh Castle came to him through his wife, Mary O'Kelly, who received the property as an inheritence from Rev. Patrick O'Kelly after his death in 1830. It is known that Mathias Kenny was living at Freagh Castle and farming the 152 acres in 1855. Freagh Castle is located about 6 miles north of Spanish Point, north of a minor road. It is still standing and was recently restored. It has it's original entrance and gates. It is a fine L shaped two-floor, three-bay, plain house, with a central two-floor castellated porch with corner pinnacles, facing south over the Freagh river valley, and with a magnificant view of the Atlantic Ocean in the west. There are interesting carved stone gate piers and a walled garden. A yard adjoins the east and north. To the south-west, on the shore close by Freagh Island, are the ruins of Freagh's medieval castle. There is also a fine puffing hole on the nearby shoreline. The castle was owned by the O'Gorman family who were originally a Leinster family, but were expelled to the Ibrickan barony shortly after the Anglo-Norman invasion of Ireland. They soon became chiefs in the locality. Thomas Gorman was living here about 1814. Reverand O'Kelly came into it's possession during the 1820's and after his death gave the land to Mary, his second cousin once removed.

[NI0506] Her nephew Patrick O'Kelly was a second cousin of William Cox, who married Elizabeth Vaandeleur, second cousin of the Great Duke of Wellington's wife.

[NI0512] Lived in Rhodesia. He was a Lieutenant in the Rhodesian Regiment during WWI.

[NI0518] Patrick Joseph Kelly was a school inspector. He was also an accomplished athlete, winning many high jump records around the world. He was the Irish high jump record holder for many years, and temporarily held the world's high jump record around 1884 and also the English high jump record in 1885.

[NI0519] John Alphonsus married Elizabet Behan, whose family came from France. They named their second child, Randal, because it was a fmaily name on the Behan side.

John' second wife was buried in a Protestant grave near Kilrush. No information is available on this marriage.

[NI0520] Mary Teresa was a Sister of Mercy, and was known as Mother Columbia.

[NI0521] Thomas was a solicitor in Bellevue, Kilrush.

[NI0523] Sister Patricia was the Superior of the Convent in Ennis, Co. Clare.

[NI0524] Gertrude was a nun in the Sister of Mercy order.

[NI0525] She was a Sister of Mercy in St. Michael's Hospital in Kingstown.

[NI0526] James was a member of a junior branch of the Cox family of Mountpleasant.

[NI0531] Anabella was the fifth daughter or Mr Richard Silles (JP).

[NI0532] Michael obtained a Diploma of Architecture at the University of Liverpool. He took his mother's maiden name and was known as Michael R. Silles-kelly. He worked with Michael Killeen, the Clare County Registrar to complete a useful research ancestral report.

[NI0533] Richard took the name of his mother, SIlles.

[NI0535] He was the J.P. for Woodlands in Wimbledon, near London, England. Annabella was his fifth daughter.

[NI0536] One of the Behan's shot his own brother and had to emigrate to Latin America where he spent the rest of his life in a monestary.

[NI0539] Michael inherited Cree house. He in turn left it to his eldest son, John Kelly.

[NI0540] Randal emmigrated to the U.S.A. at the age of 21. He arrived in New York, where he lived for a few years. After watching "more people jumping out of a building in New York than lived in Cree" he decided to move to Las Angeles. He obtained Citizenship on Feb 12, 1926 in Los Angeles, at which time he legally changed his name to Randal Kelly. He served in the US military in New Guinea during the second world war. After the big earthquake in San Fransisco he moved to Kansas City in the early 40's, where he married and got a job as a bartender in the Westport Inn in February 1947. He quickly became a very popular man in Kansas City. His warm welcomes and hearty personality had a very positive effect on the Westport Inn. He bought out Leo Ghent, one of the owners in September 1947 and ran the Inn until 1977 when the other owner, Art Brock, died. At that time the Inn was officially renamed "Kelly's Westport Inn" and it has been the name of one of Kansas City's most famous watering holes ever since. On March 16, 1984 Mayor Richard Berkley of Kansas City, declared the day "Randal Kelly Day". Randal was a very popular man in the community and will be remembered for his contributions to the economic development and the aura of good fellowship of Kansas City. The Inn is the oldest standing building in Kansas City. It was built in 1837 and was a grocery store until it became a saloon in 1934 after Prohibition was repealed. The location has been a saloon since that day, and was designated a national landmark in 1959. Two of his children, Patrick and Kyle, now run the Inn.

[NI0544] Margaret married her third cousin, Timothy.

[NI0545] Timothy had a farm in East Cree, which he left to their only child, Patrick the fiddler.

[NI0550] Composed a beautiful poem for the marriage of Miss Agnes O'Kelly and Michael Clancy.

[NI0553] Maria may have been born in 1863.

[NI0554] Patrick was a farmer and a musician.

[NI0567] John was a publican and grocer in Kilmihil, Co. Calre, Ireland.
John is Paddy Murrihy's Grandfather.

[NI0570] Father Timothy lived out his retirement in Leitrim Lodge, until his death in 1931.

[NI0579] William was listed as a principal farmer in Ahaga in the Parish of Kilmihil in an1891-1892 directory. He and Kate died childless.

[NI0580] James Kelly was known as Jimmy ogeB, i.e Young Jimmy. James was lame and was also known as "Jamesy Boccaugh or Baccach". James was well educated and became a Professor of Maths in Queens University, Belfast. He was asked to return to Clohanincy to work the family farm. He specialized in pedigree cattle and used to exhibit them in Dublin.

[NI0583] James was given the nickname Jimmy Og, meaning, Young Jimmy. Jimmy married his second cousin, Margaret. The Reverand Patrick O'Kelly inititally bequethed the sum of 200 pounds sterling to each of James' sons. For some reason he revoked this in a codicil to the will, just prior to his death. Even though they were second cousins this marriage is peculiar in that each of them had a brother who was a famous priest - both these priests and they ages are in no doubt, but onwe of them was born in 1758 and the other in 1803. It is possible, but unusual. There is an unproven theory that one of these priests wa the son of this James, rather than a brother / brother-in-law.

[NI0584] Gussie was a guard in Cork. He married and had at least two children.

[NI0591] Michael was the J.P. of Tarmon and Beffa in Killimer Parish.

[NI0592] Elizabeth descended in the female line from Mr. Van Hoogort, who came to Queerin from Holland.

[NI0594] Mary was an accomplished violinist.

[NI0595] Bridget Gibson married her cousin Pat Mor Kelly and had 10 children.

[NI0596] May was an accomplished musician and well known as a brilliant pianist.

[NI0597] Babs loved music and science. She was very particular about good eitquette in her family. She died of a heart attack at age 83.

[NI0598] The O'Brien's were believed to have come from another county, maybe Cork. His mother's family may have come from the Bridgeman family. They originally owned Hurdlestown in Broadford until the Bentley's came with Cromwell in 1652.

[NI0599] Bridget was a school teacher. She was known to be quite an eccentric lady, and liked to be driven around in her pony and trab in plus fours. Her sister, Margaret was her bridesmaid.

[NI0600] William "Willy", was a passionate believer in the independance of Ireland and of the Republic. After the Anglo-Irish treaty was signed by Michael Collins and Lloyd George, William joined the Republican army, who were anti-treaty. Civil War broke out in 1922 between the supporters of the treaty and those who were anti-treaty. Prior to this war Lloyd George had recruited a mercenary army, called the Black and Tans. This was essentially a para military force recruited by Lloyd George in 1920 to put down the Irish independance movement. The Black and Tans stayed at the local barracks in Broadford. In 1921 the treaty was signed and the Black and Tans evacuated the barracks. The local Republican movement led by their Captain, Willy O'Brien occupied the barracks. On the day before Palm Sunday 1922 the boys were attacked while they were in their beds by the pro-treaty troops. During this altercation Willy was shot in the back and was fatally wounded. It is rumored that "Lumpy", who was in the Republican movement with Willy, was a traitor and was the one who shot Willy. Anoter story has it that Willy was shot by Captain Montogue of the Free State army. The pro treaty supporters went onto win the civil war and the treaty was ratified.

[NI0601] Patrick was an expert judge of cattle. He founded the East Clare Creameries company.

[NI0602] Phylis is a nun at the Little Company of Mary at Milford House, a convent in Limerick.

[NI0610] The McDonalds were originally from Scotland.

[NI0626] Jack was consistently in trouble, and finally died when he was pushed out of a window in his apartment in New York.

[NI0630] Joan died of a drug overdose in New York.

[NI0639] Patrick was nephew to James Kelly of Finorebeg and Craggaknock, and was heir to his estate. Patrick was the Esquire of Prospect Lodge and was of Finorberg in West Clare. Prospect Lodge is located in the townland of Knockphuteen, in the Parish of Killofin, near Kilrush. It is located north of the central Labasheeda peninsula road. During the later part of the 20th century the new house was still standing, although uninhabited. It is an interesting, irregular, 19th century one and a half floor, four-bay residence. Patrick died Intestate. Patrick was a second cousin of William Cox, who married Elizabeth Vandeleur, the second cousin of the Great Duke of Wellington's wife. Patrick died intestate 30 June 1824.

[NI0640] Thomas was a J.P. His sister, Helen, married James Scully, second cousin of Sir Thomas Wyse, whose wife was a niece of Napoleon I.

[NI0642] Randal and Margaret had a large family, four of whom went to America. Randal owned 569 acres of Querin House lands in 1878, of which almost 60 adjoined the house itself. They had a very large family, four of whom went to America. Refer to "The Borough Family of Querrin" by M.M Wright, in "The Other Clare" Vol 9, April 1985.

[NI0674] Patrick purchased Tirovanan House in O'Callaghans Mills from the McInerney family on the occassion of his marraige to their daughter.

[NI0676] Lawrence emmigrated to the USA about 1875.

[NI0682] Dennsi was an accompished musician and played the concert flute.

[NI0683] Patrick was an accompished musician and played the concertina.

[NI0686] Michael Vaughan supplied most of the information related to his family contained herein.






[NI0691] Canon Patrick was the President of St. Flannan's College in Ennis, Co. Clare. He probably would have been appointed Bishop, but he rode to the hounds and drank considerably. He was an acknowledged expert on history. He once told Donagh Vaughan that we have a direct connection to the Baron of Fethard in County Tipperary, a County adjacent to Co. Clare in Ireland. He was a member of the Fine Gael. He died as the Parish Priest of Kilrush, Co. Clare.

[NI0697] The Vaughan family genelogy starts with the emmigration of Lawrence Vaughan from Wales to Ireland in the late part of the 18th century. He married Catherine from Feakle and settled down in West Clare. The Vaughan family name was originally O'Beachain in Gaelic and pronouned O'Via-karrn.

[NI0700] Thomas Vaughan emmigrated to the USA around 1777. Assuming that he went by assisted passage, he probably arrived in a place called Stratten Island. Follow up on this.

[NI0703] Paddy worked in the Civil Service in Dublin, Ireland.

[NI0704] Like her brother, Annie worked in the Civil Service in Dublin, Ireland.

[NI0724] James moved to Broadford from Tirovanan and purchased a number of farms for his children. He purchased Gurtnaglough, which means Stony Garden in Gaelic, for his son "Little Jimmy". He also purchased a farm for his son Patrick.

[NI0728] Pat Vaughan supplied most of the information related to the Vaughan family. Padraig is staying with his sister Kathleen Conlon in Fairy Hall, O'Briens Bridge,( Droichead Ui Bhriain) Co. Clare at the time of preparation of this document. Kathleen is mother of twins Andy and Mary.

[NI0739] James, known as Jim, is a successful businessman. After spending many years working at the Gresham Hotel in downtown Dublin, Jim became a travel agent in 1996. Jim's Godmother is Mary Frances Vaughan, who married Tom Kelly.

[NI0755] She lives in Backfield with her brother, Louie.

[NI0757] Rita was a Sacret Heart of Jesus and Mary nun for some time, but eventually left and married Tom Brown.

[NI0758] Francie was a musician in a "ceile" band from Tulla.

[NI0765] Liam left Sallybank and acquired a farm at Kilmore on the road to Limerick form Broadford in Co. Clare, Ireland.

[NI0768] Although he is of the Derrymore branch, James resides some miles away from Derrymore, in Ardan, Six-Mile-Bridge.

[NI0770] Parick is still alive in 1998. He owns Feenagh House in Six-Mile-Bridge, Co. Clare. He is retired and living in Derrymore House. He gave Feenagh House to his nephew Patrick Alphonsus, who married Bride Brien.

[NI0771] Mary Frances went to grade school in Kilkishen and then to bording school in Gort , County Galway. She entered the Sisters Of Mercy in Dundalk on 3rd October 1947. The Sisters Of Mercy order of nuns was founded by Catherine McCauley in 1831 in Dublin and catered to poor girls of good character. As a nun Sister Cecilia trained for nursing from 1952 to 1955 and served as a matron until her retirement in 1993. She liked to travel and spent many years on assignments in Rome and Alabama. She lived in Alabama from 1960 to 1964.

[NI0775] Vincent went to St, Flannans College in Ennis. He won several prizes for his music and singing. He died during college.

[NI0779]

[NI0781] TWIN

[NI0784] Bernadette has a degree in marketing research and is now developing her own business.

[NI0785] Oliver qualified in Horticultural Science.

[NI0786] Bright lady. Received a Masters Degree in Science from the University if Dublin. She specializes in envirnomental science.

[NI0787] Received a degree in Horticultural science from Dublin.

[NI0788] Studying surveying in Waterford.

[NI0789] He received a degree in Art from the University of Limerick, and is now living in Holland.

[NI0801] Kyle and Pat own the Kelly Westport Inn in Kansas City, Missouri. The phone number of the pub is 816-361-8826. Patrick's home number is 816-561-6324.

[NI0803] John inherited Cree House and Leitrim House when his father Michael died. Leitrim house was left to John, because nobody in the same generation as John married and had children.

[NI0804] He is a golfer.

[NI0818] Mitch studied at the Rockhurst High School. He is an excellent golfer.

[NI0834] In addition to the seven children listed here, it is believed that Michael had another 6 children who died as infants. Michael Clancy was the Great Grandfather of Paddy Waldron. Michael Clancy wrote a letter on 9 May 1927 to his niece Ciss Waldron. Ciss was therefore a child of one of Michael's sisters.

[NI0844] Owned vast tracks of land in Tipperary

[NI0849] Although we do not have the will of Patrick to verify that he bequethed Drummina to Susan, we do know from the Land Valuation in 1855 that Susan was leasing the farm from the Marquis of Thomond. It was a very substantial 127 acres, with 3 houses on the property. Susan married Michael McMahon, and whose family had paid a 250 pound dowry for Michael to marry Susan. Drummina has remained occupied by Kellys in an unbroken line, right down to the present occupants Thomas and Bernadette.

[NI0850] Jeremiah, known as "Old Jer", married Bridget Scanlon, and they had 8 children. From these children are descended the Porte Kelly's, the Fosters (Belfast) and the Comyns (Ballyvaughan). Jeremiah first lived in Ballygriffey, and about 1860 he purchased the house and surrounding lands (demesne) of Porte Ruan, which is in the townland of Portlecka in the Parish of Ruan. Jeremiah wrote his will on April 19, 1882, shortly before he died. In this last will he appointed his wife and brother Thomas Kelly as Trusteees and executors. He left his estate at Nuan Porte, Drummina , Paefield, Caherbulolog and Newtown and the farms at Lisdoonvarna, Ballycashin, Lisket, Cloonagh, Deelcu, Faanygalvin, Roxborough, Rathvergin pulloy, and Banlcun to his son Jeremiah in addition to the sum of 4000 pounds; the farms at Ballyallaban and Leminagh and 1000 pounds to Francis. He left Bridget he left an annuity of one hundred pounds "for her life"; Michael an annuity of 60 pounds and the farm at Carhue and 500 pounds to his nephew Jeremiah (son of his brother James). He left his daughters, Susan and Elizabeth the sum of 3000 pounds each to be paid on their ("approved") marriage or on entering religious community. He bequeathed 500 pounds tio the Parish Priest of Ruan for the buidling of a chapel at Ruan and another 500 pounds to build a family vault at Ruan. Finally, Jeremiah left 500 pounds to his illegitimate son Edmond Kelly, who was living in Australia in 1882. Porter Ruan is still in the hands of his descendants. Porte Ruan, which means the landing place of the trees, is located east of the Ennis Road, less than one mile south of Ruan. The property is still standing and is inhabited. It is an irregular, 17th or 18th century house, with a two-floor, three-bay, 19th century front containing a central front door, facing south over Dromore Lake. It incorporates three specific periods of architectural history. Porte Ruan is approached by a longish drive from the west through a tree-scattered parkland. Nearby is the roadside museum of this branch of the Kelly family.

[NI0864] Mary Mahon was the third daughter of Edmond Mahon, by his second wife, Margaret Hogan.

[NI0874] As part of the settlement of Cromwell of 1653, William Keny and his wife, Anne, were transplated from Co. Waterford to Co. Clare, with a load of live stock.

[NI0875] Timothy Kelly was the son of Patrick Kelly, who was a Captain in the Irish Army and was slain at the Battle of Aughrim in 1691. Patrick's first wife, Miss Plunket, was a sister in law of the then Lord Clare, who introduced this branch of the Kelly family into Clare from Ui Maine. It was through his second wife, Elizabeth Reid, that Timothy Kelly of Craggaknock was born. Timothy's first wife, Miss Plunkett, was a sister in law of the then Lord Clare.

[NI0877] James of Finorbeg and of Craggaknock, was appointed a J.P. in 1797 and died suddenly on 4 October 1800. He was unmarried and his large estate was granted to his nephew and hier Patrick O'Kelly (Father of Mary O'Kelly), and administration of his estate granted to PatrickO'Kelly on 29th October, 1800. He was certified in 1765 as having conformed to Protestantism.

[NI0896] Kathleen was married and divorced three times. Her two children, from her first marriage, chose to retain their mother's maiden name, Harrison, after her separation with their father. Kathleen adopted the four children of her third husband, Daniel, which he had from previous relationships.

[NI0938] Mary married her cousin Mathew. Where's the link?

[NI0939] In 1911 The Irish census showed Margaret Davoren to be living at Clonina House under the care of Bridget Kelly her aunt. Margaret was 26 years old at this time. This Bridget Kelly was born in 1848 and was the widow of Tom Ban Kelly who had died in 1898, and the daughter of John Davoren of Ballymurphy. It is likely that Margaret was the daughter of Bidelia's brother Michael Davoren.

[NI0940] The 1901 cenus shows that James (66) and his wife, Susan (60) owned a shop in Cree. The census shows that two of their daughters and a son were living with them and were assistants. These children were Maria (29), William (25) and Catherine (16). It is believed that James and Susie also had a farm and a public house in Cree, or sold their shop to run a farm and pub. This is verified by the facts in the 1911 census that shows James (74) and his wife Susan (70) being farmers and publicans. William was still single and lived with his parents and ran the farm. The census shows that James and Susan were married in 1861 and had 9 children, 8 of which will still alive in 1911.

[NI0941] He had at least two daughters.

[NI0946] When Michael's father, Dominick disapeared in 1925, his mother, Mary Keane emigrated to Perth, Australia. Before doing so she arranged for their only child, Michael, to be raised by the Kelly family. Michael was initially raised by relatives of his father, Martin and Honor Queely of Doonaha, County Clare. He was later raised by his grandmother, Bidelia Kelly in Drumcliffe House, near Ennis. in 1926 Michael joined the McNamara bakery in Ennis, where he remanied until 1928. He was then employed with Cremin's Bakery in Newmarket on Fergus before moving to Killaloe in 1929 to work at Keogh's bakery in Ballina. Shortly after arriving in Killaloe, Michael met Elizabeth Danagher, and they married in 1933. They first lived near the old cinema in Killaloe and later in Ballina near the church. They moved to Cullina in 1939. Michael joined the Irish army on 12th June 1940 serving as a wireless operator. He left the army on 4th October 1945.

[NI0947] Elizabeth had come form Pallasgreen, Co. Limerick to work with the local Garda Superintendent in Killaloe.

[NI0950] Mary emigrated to NY, USA on August 7, 1953. She and her family returned to Ireland on June 24, 1965, and she found employment in Tulla, Co. Clare, as a librarian with the Clare, Co. Council. Her husband, Pat, was employed by Texaco in NY, USA. He has a lifetime interest in still and movie film making. The McGrath family are heavily involved in G.A.A. and traditional music in Co. Clare.

[NI0954] She was the Principal Teacher of Silvermines N.S. Nenagh, Co. Tipperary.

[NI0957] Stephen is a member of the Garda Siochan, Henry Street, Limerick.

[NI0959] Patrick is a member of the Garda Siochan, Donnybrook, Dublin 4.

[NI0960] Sean is employed by Clare County Council.

[NI0963] Dominick emigrated to New York, USA, in 1956. He served with the US army in the USA and Germany. Later he worked for Eastern Airlines in New York. He married Patricia Walsh, whose father had emigrated from Castlebar, County Clare. They returned temporarily to Ireland 1976-1979. He is a distinguished poet and had a volume of his works published in 2000.

[NI0969] Elizabeth emigrated to the USA on May 7, 1957. He passage was paid for by her brother, Dominick, and she was sponsored by Paddy and Mary McGrath. She returned to Ireland on August 8, 1960 and she married Sam the following year.

[NI0970] Sam is the third child of Andrew and Mary Molamphy from Garykennedy, Portroe, Co. Tipperary. He qualified as a metalwork teacher in 1959 and worked in Templemore Vocational School (V.S.), Limerick and Thomad College of Education at the University of Limerick. He had a lifetime interest in fishing, and represented Irealnd at various times. His family are currently living at Clonlara, Co. Clare.

[NI0977] Breda worked in the Benson Box Co. factory in Killaloe. She emigrated to NY about 1961. Her husband is a qualified carpenter in New York. They now live in North Ridge, West Berne, New York State.

[NI0981] Michael was a qualified carpenter. He worked for the Benson Box Co. in their box factory in Killaloe. He emigrated to London in 1956, returning to Ireland about 1961. He became a company director and contracts manager with Castlerock Construction Co. in Limerick. He returned again to London with his family in 1988 and that is where they currently reside.

[NI0983] Dominick is a qualified self employed plasterer and he lives in London.

[NI0984] Michael is a lecturer in Project Management at the University of Limerick.

[NI0988] Veronica worked in the Benson Box Factory, Killaloe. She met her husband, John, when he worked on CIE boats in Killaloe.

[NI0989] John was the son of the Dunne's of Allen Wodd, Naas, Co. Kildare.

[NI0995] Twin and Anthony were twins. Anthony died at birth.

[NI0997] Rita worked in the Benson Box Co. box factory in Killaloe. She met her husband, Michael, there, where he was a driver. The family lived at Cross Roads in Killaloe and moved to Tralee, Co. Kerry in 1999.

[NI1002] Christina qualified as a National School (N.S.) Teacher. She was the Principal of Ballytarsna N.S. near Cashel, Co. Tipperary. Her husband, Mr. Hayes, worked as a postman in the Cashel Post Office. He had a lifetime interest in breeding and training dogs.

[NI1008] Patrick worked as an apprentice electrician at the Ardnacrusha Power Station and as an electrician at Poolbeg and Turlough Hill Power Stations. He was also a craft assistant with the Limerick City V.E.C. and a section head with AnCo Limerick. He is an Amateur Genealogist. His wife Maura Farrell worked as a Clerical Officer with the Departments of Justice and Foreign Affairs in Dublin from 1970 until 1973 and then at the Nenagh Convent School. She has worked at the Sweeney-McGann Solicitors on O'Connell Street, Limerick from 1990 through 2002. Her family comes from Rearcross, Co. Tipperary.

[NI1009] Maura was the third daughter of Patrick and Mary Farrell of Main Street, Cloughjordan, Co. Tipperary.

[NI1013] Angela initially worked as a telephonist with the Department of Posts and Telegraphs in Limerick, but emigrated to New York about 1973. Her husband had emigrated to Florida about 1958. Angela remarried in 2001.

[NI1017] Joseph was a qualified radio operator. He went to sea in 1969, and then worked for the Dept of Transportation and Power at Ballygireen radio station in Co. Clare. Joseph played rugby with the Crescent rugby club in Limerick. Maureen worked at the School of Catering at Shannon airport.

[NI1018] Only daughter of Eamon and Teresa O'Brien of "Sheelin'", Ckanmaurice Avenue, Limerick.

[NI1026] In the Parish marriage records it was noted that Catherine was from Cree and the daughter of James Kileen (living) a farmer and publican.

[NI1028] Margaret had an affair with a neighbor and had to leave for England.

[NI1030] Miss Plunket was the first wife of Patrick Kelly. She was a Sister-in-law of the then Lord Clare, who it is believed introduced this branch of the Kelly family into Clare from Hymany, Galway.

[NI1032] Patrick Kelly descended from the Kelly's who were living in S.W. Co. Clare in the first half of the 17th century. He was a Captain in the Army, and was slain at the Battle of Aughrim in 1691. His first wife, Miss Plunket, was a sister in law of the then Lord Clare, who introduced this branch of the Kelly family into Clare for Hymany (pronounced High-Mani) Galway. It was through his second wife, Elizabeth Reid, that he had a son, Timothy (Kelly of Craggaknock).

[NI1037] Timothy inherited Cree Cottage from his Aunt Kelly.

[NI1042] Mary was a State Registered Nurse (SRN).

[NI1043] Cecily has been instrumental in providing much of the data that suports this information.

[NI1045] Richard was a talented musician. The following appreciation by his friend Pat Cleary appeared in The Clare Champion on 21 January 2000 "It is rare that the death of a colleague creates such sadness in the entertainment industry as the unexpected passing of Dick O'Donnell. A native of Cree, Dick was laid to rest in his beloved West Clare on Friday 17th December. A musical legend in his native county and beyond for around half a century, he was a close relative of the equally legandary Paddy Kelly, the renowned Cree traditional fiddler, an old recording of whom was played on Clare FM only a few nights ago by Tim Dennehy. Dick O'Donnell commenced his musical career with Jack Madigan's Band from Ennistymon when they played at every dance hall in the county and beyond throughout the 50s. He later joined Steven Howard's Band in Kilrush who was equally well know around that time and in the early 60s his great love for the ceol saw him join in the formation of the fledgling but short lived Fainne Or Ceili Band in Kilmihil. Later on still, he guested on many occasions with Dance Bands of the caliber of Brose Walsh from Mayo with whom he formed a close friendship. And up to quite recently, he continued playing with the well known Bannermen, having played with many other local bands in the intervening period. Anyone who came across Dick O'Donnell (and that seemed to be nearly everyone. judging by the massive crowds at his funeral) knew him as a genial, quietly spoken, kind and considerate gentleman, always impeccable in dress and the essence of charm and professionalism. His enormous musical repertoire covered the entire spectrum and indeed it was often remarked that he was equally at ease with a Strauss waltz or the blue tango as he was with a set of reels. He will be sadly missed from his annual residencies at Ballinalacken Castle and the Spa Wells where he had cultivated a legion of friends and followers over many years. I offer my condolences to his dear widow, Sheila, and to his three sisters and other relatives in Cree and in England. A true maestro is gone from us. Ar Dheis De go raibh a anam dilis.

[NI1047] Tom lives in a house next door to Cree Cottage.

[NI1053] John and his wife Anne are buried in the old church at Kilmurry, Ibrickan; the date on the vault is 1810. John built the Doolough House property for his son Mathew. It is believed that John belongs to the third generation of Kellys resident in Craggaknock.

[NI1064] He was a second cousin of General Sir Thomas Kelly-Kenny and of Edward Kenny of Ennis, Father of the Right Hon. William Kenny (1846-1921).

[NI1065] John was the seventh son. No record available of the others.

[NI1066] He was the Parish priest of Castleconnell in Co. Clare, and was known as Father Mathias Kenny.

[NI1072] James was the second cousin of Sir Thomas Wyse, whose wife was a niece of Napoleon I.

[NI1074] Patrick lived in Miltown-Malbay and in 1841 he lived in Dublin.

[NI1075] Anne was a descendant of the 20th Baron of Kerry, Ireland.

[NI1076] Vowel descended from the 20th Baron of Kerry

[NI1088] Timothy lived to be over 100 (a Centenarian).

[NI1089] John inherited Craggaknock from his father, Patrick. He married a distant cousin, Margaret Killeen and they had several children. One of these children had a son John Francis Kelly, who is not shown here, but was born in 1897. The father was not Christopher as in the 1911 census this boy John was listed as a nephew of Christopher. As such the father was probably Gerard although little is known about him.

[NI1090] It appears that Margaret was a fourth cousin of John. She died when she was 86. Paddy Waldron refers to a letter dated 9 May 1927 from Margaret's son-in-law Michael Clancy to his niece Ciss Waldron. This may be the connection with Paddy (that I have often wondered about).

[NI1092] Christopher was a J.P.

[NI1093] Her cousin Elizabeth composed a beautiful poem for her marriage.

[NI1100] Michael left home for England to become a policeman. He later served for a number of years in the Dublin Metropolitan Police and eventually retired to live in a house in the West End of Kilkee. The sponsors at his baptism were John Markham and Eliza Clancy. His obituary was printed in The Clare Champion on 20 July 1946. This stated that he had 13 children without naming them. The 1911 Census (90/5/27) confirms that they had 8 children of whom only 4 were still living (including George who died a few years later).

[NI1102] Ignatius was a lawyer in Ennis. He was admitted to the Incorporated Law Society in 1934 and practiced as Ignatius M. Houlihan & Son (Desmond), 10 Bindon Street, Ennis, Co. Clare. Igantius bought Craglea House in Ennis (on the Ennistymon Road in the Drumcliffe Parish) from Group Capatain Molony about 1959, and he was still living there in 1989.

[NI1103] Margaret was educated at Rathfarnham. She became a nurse and started at the Mater Hospitial in Dublin. She later became a Matron at the Benedictine Abbey and school in Ambleforth College in Yorkshire and retained that position for over 30 years. She retired to the Ennis area, where she still had strong family ties.

[NI1110] George farmed the Blackall lands in Caherlean and Killard. He visited Australia more than once, including in the lifetime of his granddaughter Moya Baile, who was born in 1904. He is listed among the Gentry and Clergy in an 1886 directory of Doonbeg. George defeated Thomas Studdert for the Killard seat on the Kilrush Board of Guardians in 1853, and in 1885 he was voted to the post of vice-chairman when he defeated Michael Behan of Tarmon by 21 votes to 20. The Clare Journal of 27 Nov 1871 listed George Blackall among those present at a meeting of Kilrush Union presided over by Col. Vandleur, M.P. George and his wife Anne appear to have been second cousins, both great grandchildren of William Butler and Elizabeth O'Brien. George was a nephew of Marcella Blackall, who married Hugh Clancy of Killard.

[NI1111] George was the manager of the Munster and Leinster Bank in Limerick, and also in Thurles, where his daughter Nancy was raised.

[NI1112] After attending the Royal University of Dublin, Patrick went to London where he lived for three years before emigrating to Sydney, Australia in 1988. He married Alice in 1899 in NSW. He was the Alderman and three times mayor of his town, Queanbayan, in NSW

[NI1113] Dr. Blackall was educated at Queen's College, Cork, and became an M.D. in 1874. He became the Dispensary Medical Officer for the Parish of Killadysert and Ballincally, Co. Clare. He retired in 1915 after 39 years of service.

[NI1114] Thomas was born in 1873. At the age of 26 he was working as Clerk of the Petty Sessions Court in both Kilrush and Knock. He remained in this post until the foundation of the Free State in 1922, when the Petty Sessions were replaced by the District Court. In 1902 he owned an IE4, which was one of the first motor cars registered in County Clare.

[NI1115] Susan was baptised on April 20, 1856 and she was sponsored by John and margaret Kelly.

[NI1118] Nancy Blackall and her husband, Friday, inherited the Blackall estates in Killard from Miss Massie Blackall, who never married. She hosted many 'House Masses' and was popular for doing so. In 1955 the Doonbeg Book Committee published a story from Joe Hurley of Doonbeg: 'I always looked forward to the house Masses, especially the one at Miss Massy Backall in Killard. When we arrived at the hill of Killard, Father Andy McNamara used to turn off the ignition to economise on petrol and let the car run free wheel. This used to put the fear of God in me as I pictured himself and myself landing in the middle of the White Strand. After Mass we were served breakfast and I was given generous pocket money by the good old lady'. Massie was a second cousin of George Mickie Clancy.

[NI1124] Margaret was the Grandaughter of Randal Borough of Querrin

[NI1126] Probably the author of a Kelly-Behan Genealogical report.

[NI1127] Major R.A.M.C.
Died Unmarried

[NI1128] I.S.O. Assistant Registrar General of Ireland. Died unmarried and intestate in Dun Laoghaire. Buried in Dean Grange Cemetry in Dun Laoghaire.

[NI1129] David was of Bushy Park.

[NI1131] He was a Major R.A.M.C.

[NI1132] Mathew was known as Matt the Manager. He was manager of the National Bank of Kilrush. In 1855 Mathew was in possession of the 201 acre demesne (domain) of Doolough Lodge. King George V was a guest here when visiting Ireland following his coronation in 1910. Doolough Lodge is located in the townland of Treanmanagh, in the Parish of Kilmurry, Ibrickan. It is located off a minor road, about 3 miles west of Doo Lough, and about 9 miles SSE of Miltown Malbay. It is still standing and inhabited with the original gates and gateway. It is a delightfully situated, large 19th century, hip-roofed, L-shaped, one-floor, three-bay lodge, with a contemporary porch protecting the central front door. It faces south from the hillside overlooking a small park. Doolough Lodge is approached by a short curved drive from the west. Circular level terraces step down from the front. The 100 acre farm surrounding the house was part of the 5736 acre Treanmanagh estate. Mathew was a D.L. for Co. Clare. Matt is known to have contributed to the establishment of a Convent of Mercy in Kilrush.

[NI1134] Mary Kelly married Matt the Manager Kelly.

[NI1135] Mathias owned estates in Treanmanagh, and left these to his nephew Thomas, later General Sir Thomas Kelly-Kenny.

[NI1138] Matt was given the nickname, Matt Og, meaning Young Matt. Although he was of Doolough Lodge, it is known that he lived in Fitzwilliam Square, Dublin, where he was a J.P. The Clare Journal printed a glowing tribute to Mathew on 12 September 1910. Mathew was the 'Court Valuer to the County Courts of Kildare, Carlow, Wicklow, Wexford and County Clare; for several years a Sub-Commissioner, being appointed shortly after the passing of the act of 1881; acted in that capacity under the presidency of the late Judge Kane until the latter's appointment as County Court Judge, when he became Judge Kane's Court Valuer; possessed a wide knowledge of agricultural details and the value of land and was a painstaking and able official; his kindness and disposition and untiring energy in the interests of the poor people endeared him to a very wide circle.' Mathew first married Isabel Moran, daughter of Augustine Moran about 1862. Isabel died 19 Apr 1900. Matthew later married Mary Kenny-3030, daughter of Matthew Kenny on 24 Jul 1901.

[NI1142] Thomas Kelly's career in the British army began in 1858 at the age of 18 and continued until 1905. In 1874 he assumed the additional surname of Kenny under the will of his Uncle Mathias Kenny (J.P.), who left his estates in Clare including Treanmanagh. He was highly decorated in the army, including a knighthood and a C.B.E, and became known as Lieutenant-General Sir Thomas Kelly-Kenny, C.B.E. He served in the Queens Royal West Surrey Regiment, and was adjutant General to the British Forces.The General served in China (1860), Abyssinia (1867-1868) and in South Africa (1899-1901). He was visited in Doolough by George V shortly after his coronation in 1910. He was also a G.C.V.O., J.P., and D.L. of Doolough. He died unmarried in Sussex leavbing 5736 acres. He bequeathed most of his property to his nephew Thomas O'Gorman of Caherealla, son of Margaret Kelly. Many tributes were published on the General. One of these living tributes was published around 1899 while he was serving in South Africa. "General Kelly-Kenny is an Irishman, as the name implies. He comes of good fighting and sporting stock. A soldier by instinct, he owes his progress in his profession to merit alone. He was gazetted to the Queen's as Ensign on February 2nd 1858. He had not been two years as subaltern when he was selected for Staff duties as Aide-De-Camp to the General Commanding in South Africa. But he was not destined to remain long at the Cape, for the war having broke out in North China in 1860 he proceeded there in time to secure an appointment as orderly Officer to Brigadier Jephsen, who took the First Battalion of the Queen's from the Cape to join the Expeditionary Force. He did duty as such in the action of Sinho, when he was mentioned in dispatches, and at the taking of Tangku and the Taku Forts. He thus won his first war medal with clasp. The Queen's were moved to England after the war, and Lieutenant Kelly-Kenny remained with them. Obtaining his company in July 1866, he proceeded with the First Battalion to India in 1867. He was again mentioned in dispatches on account for his "zeal, energy and ability". On July 1st 1881 he was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. In August 1893 he joined the Staff at the Horse Guards as Assistant Adjtant-General and in December was transferred to Aldershot where he acted as the Duke of Connacht's Chief of Staff Officer until March 1896. His substantive rank came to him in March 1897, and in July following he was recalled to Army Headquarters to fill the dual office of Inspector-General of Auxiliary Forces and Recruiting. On December 4th (probably 1899) he left for Cape Town as Lieutenant-General Commanding of the 6th division, to the great advantage of all ranks serving under him, who as an officer wrote recently, 'regard him alike with affection and respect, and would follow him anywhere, knowing well under his able leadership that they would be taken straight to victory, whatever the odds were against them.'"

[NI1143] Timothy was an officer in the army. In January 1863 it was reported that Timothy had received his nomination, by purchase, to the Ceylon Rifles. He died while still in the army unmarried.

[NI1151] Mary Anne Kelly also raised soem of her grandchildren, including Louise Kelly, who was known as Louise O'Donnell. Mary Anne willed the family farm to Catherine Louise.

[NI1152] They have children.

[NI1153] Timothy inherited the family farm in Clohaninchy and was living there in 1925. He married Catherine Crowe and they children.

[NI1163] Timothy Kelly, sometimes known as Thady, was born in 1803 in Craggaknock in the Parish of Kilmurry, Ibrickane. He was from the third generation of the Kelly's of Craggaknock, the present descendants being the ninth. Timothy Kelly was educated at Maynooth College where he distinguished himself as a scholar. He graduated to the Dunboyne establishment in order to pursue a higher course of studies. However, emergencies at the Parish resulted in his return to his diocese and in 1831, at the age of 28, he was appointed Parish Priest of the united parishes of Cooraclare and Kilmihil. After a three-year pastorate he felt the need for a new church at Kilmihil. This need was based on the fact that masses at that time had to be offered in wayside chapels such as barns. Although the landowners were poor as much of this area was bogland and mountains, the church was built in 1834. Two years later he again built a church in Cooraclare and after being transferred to Kilrush in 1848, he finished off building the church in Cree. He imported food to Kilrush and sold his own horse to buy food. He was a candidate for coadjutor bishop of Killaloe in 1858. He was instrumental, not least through his substantial personal financial contribution, in bringing the Sisters of Mercy to Kilrush in 1855. Timothy left his house in Frances Street for use as a monastery by the Christian Brothers. He lived out his retirement in Leitrim Lodge and was said to be responsible for building the part that now stands. He left some investments to further the care of orphans from the Kilrush area by the Sisters of Mercy. A sculpture of him was erected in a niche in the right hand wall of the main aisle of Kilrush church. Joe Kelly came into the possession of a portrait of Timothy. The Venerable Archdeacon Peter Ryan, who was Parish priest of Kilrush and died on July 11th 1972, wrote an amazing article called History of Kilrush, which was essentially about Father Tim, in which he closed 'Judged by the standards of priestly attainment Father Tim Kelly was a man of acknowledged sanctity, selflessness, intellectual caliber, pastoral activity and achievement comparable with the best of his time within his own country. Familiar as I am with the outstanding reputation he enjoyed in three present West Clare parishes and having heard of him at first hand from many who knew him I feel that no priest ever known to have belonged to the Corablascin territory has been his peer as a priest, or none that has known to have ministered there - and it has had its celebrities - capable of bearing all round comparison with him. I regard Father Tim Kelly as the greatest ecclesiastic that adorned this country since Saint Sinon himself'.

[NI1167] He was a solicitor of Kelvin Grove, Kilrush.

[NI1171] He was the Mayor of Limerick in 1850. He owned grain stores in Upper William Street, beyod the junction to Gerald Griffin Street, on the left hand side.

[NI1172] Tim was a Surgeon (M.D.)

[NI1173] Thomas was the Manager of the National Bank, Nenagh, Co. Clare, Ireland. Their wedding was reported in a Clare newspaper in 1848.

[NI1174] He was the rector of Clongowes.

[NI1175] The Clare Champion printed the following obituary on June 7 1871 (and reprinted 125 years later) for Dr. O'Donnell. 'It is with no ordinary feelings of regret that we endeavor to discharge the sad duty devolving on us today of recording the death of the esteemed, lamented and eminently popular Dr O'Donnell. Through the width and breadth of the extensive Kilrush Union, indeed all over the county but more particularly in the baronies of Moyarta, lbrickane and Clonderlaw, Dr O'Donnell's name has long been regarded as a household word. With gentle and simple people, he was an equal favorite and the poor sincerely mourn his premature demise. This much-respected gentleman was the third son of the late Richard O'Donnell Esq. of Ballyket and brother of Francis O'Donnell Esq. Coroner for West Clare. For over twenty years, the deceased held the onerous and responsible appointment of medical officer of the Kilrush Union, the duties of which he was ever known to discharge with zeal, tenderness, humanity and acknowledged ability. To the officials of that institution he was kind, courteous and obliging, while the wants of the inmates were ever with him a solicitous care. To the poor, he was most attentive and to his fellow townsmen, he was most friendly and affable. Whenever a public demand needed his co-operation Dr O'Donnell was prompt to respond - no wonder indeed his loss is a source of sorrow to his numerous friends. An imposing cortege followed his remains to the family tomb in Kilrush Churchyard on Friday.'

[NI1182] Edward was born in Cork, but moved to Treanmanagh , Near Miltown Milbay in County Clare. He went to France and married Eleanor de Lacy, sister of Field Marshall Peter de Lacy (1678 - 1751) and afterwards of the Russian army. He and Elenaor had an only son, Hugh, and after his wife died he returned to France, where he became a priest and died shortly after.

[NI1184] Captain Lacy was descended from the second marriage of Hugh Lacy, the 5th Baron Lacy, the 1st Lord Deputy of Ireland, with Rose, daughter of Roderic O'Connor, King of Connacht. Captain Lacy was a Captain in the French army and was killed in French service.

[NI1185] Peter, Count Lacy, was F.M. of Russia.

[NI1187] Bridget had a sister or a cousin called Fannie Frost.

[NI1189] James was the High Sheriff for County Clare in 1879.

[NI1194] In 1882 Mathew Joseph Kenny of Freagh Castle, a Parnellite, was elected member of Parliament for Ennis, beating R.W. Carey Reeves by 41 votes. Kenny, at 21 years old was the youngest member of Parliament at the time. In 1901, as Justice Mathew J. Kenny, Gentleman, of Freagh, he was a judge in bankruptcy in the High Court, Dublin.

[NI1197] Walter wrote a letter to Daisy in Oct 1968 from Tuscon, Arizona, USA which seems to confirm that he and brother Gerald were living in the USA. It is also liekly that Gerald was now dead, but he had returned to Ireland to visit in the mid 20's.

[NI1204] Michael was dark (i.e blind).

[NI1207] George was a barrister who died without issue in 1980. He left his Freagh Castle property to his first cousin.

[NI1208] James was a vicar in Kilmanahen, Ennistymon in 1775. He became the Arcdeacon of Kilfenora in 1790. His will was proved in 1822.

[NI1217] David Kenny was a J.P. He was in the 2nd India Regiment.

[NI1219] Thomas was the Parish Priest of Clondagad, Co. Clare. Will proved Oct 29 1810.

[NI1228] Lt. Colonel

[NI1229] Major R.W. Surrey Regiment.

[NI1239] The great Grandson of Sir Alex Crawford of Kilbirnie.

[NI1240] He owned 1500 acres in Clare.

[NI1242] Miss Murane had a brother. This brother, Michael, was the Grandfather of Rita Moroney.

[NI1248] Her best friend was Mary Frances Vaughan.

[NI1262] Francis was a Medical Doctor (MD) and a Justice of the Peace (J.P.).

[NI1263] Elias Bouhereau was born in 1643 in La Rochelle, France into a stable Huguenot family. The Bouhereau's were a prominent family amongst the Protestants of La Rochelle. Elias was sent to Samour, the most important of the Protestant Academies where he was a dilignet student of theology. In 1667 he took a medical degree from the University of Orange. He later traveled to Italy with his cousin Elie Richard. He returned to La Rochelle and married Marguerite in 1668, and they had a large family. He did not seriously begin to practice his profession until 1677. The persecution of the Protestants was growing more intense and by 1688 The Huguenot physicians were forbidden to practice medicine. Eli managed to escape from France with his family and they arrived in England in 1687. His granddaughter, Jean Preboul, wrote a wonderful account of his escape - see Four Good Men, pages 79, 80 and 81 and Appendix B, pages 91, 92 and 93. On arrival in England he initially obtained employment as tutor to the Duchess of Monmouth in Cambridge. He later worked as secretary for Thomas Cox, envoy to the Swiss Cantons, and later for the Earl of Galway. It was during this period that he commenced to keep his diary, which he continued until his death in 1719. This most detailed account of his life can be found at Marsh's Library in Dublin. The diary records the journey from London to Dublin of the Bouhereau family with Galway, who King William had declared one of the three Lord Justices of Ireland. Eli and his son Richard took the oaths of Irish Nationalization at eh Kings Bench in February 1898. Eli came to the attention of Narcissus Marsh, who built the public library in Dublin. Eli accepted the post of Librarian with a house close by and in March 1709 he was given a chantry at St. Patrick's Cathedral in Dublin. Elias died in May 1719 and was buried under the altar of the Lady Chapel in St. Patrick's Cathedral. This is the inscription at the altar:
Beneath the Lady Chapel Are Buried
the mortal Remains of
Dr. Elias Bouhereau (1643-1719)
Doctor of Theology and of Medicine
First Librarian of Marsh's Library, Dublin
Progenitor of the Borough Family in Ireland…
Suivez Moi.

[NI1265] He was sponsored by his uncle John McMahon and his grandmother Mrs. Kelly.

[NI1267] The tombstone in the gravesite of William O'Brien and his wife Julianna Catherine is well preserved in the cemetry (which is not well preserved) at Kilseily Church, near Broadford. This stone was erected on July 10, 1901 by William and Julianna while they were still alive at ages 88 and 73 respectively. Kilsiely Church was the original Parish church until the church in Broadford was built. In the Clare Champion of May 10, 1896, the following article was written: "Kilsely Church in Broadford has been presented with two chancel chairs and a beautifully carved oaken lectern by J.D. Going esquire (JP) of Violet Hill". The Kilseily cemetry is about 1 mile up the Liscane Road.

[NI1269] Thomas was baptised on January 25, 1879 and was sponsored by a Reverand Patrick O'Kelly and Ellen Killiney. The 1901 census showed that Tommy (age 22) was living at Clonina House with his mother, Bridget, niece Margaret Davoren and three servants, Michael Davoren (27), Peter Tuohy (80) and Ellen McMahon (55). Parish marriage records show that he married Catherine Killeen from Cree South in 1906. He and Catherine must have moved to a nearby house in the Clonina townland, because the 1911 Irish census shows Thomas "Tommy" Kelly as living in the townland of Clonina with his wife Catherine and two young sons, Thomas and John. Tommy's mother, Bridget (Davoren), was alive and living at nearby Clonina House with another of her sons, Dominick. Also shown as living in the townland of Clonina in 1911 were his cousin John Kelly, his wife, Mary, his mother Mary and four children. Tommy's servant Patrick Honan (single and age 30) was also shown as living with Tommy and his family. In the Parish marriage records it was noted that Thomas Kelly was a farmer from Clonina and the son of Thomas Kelly (deceased) who was also a farmer.

[NI1281] Cissie lived with aunt, Mrs Keogh, in Dublin and was educated at Muckross. By 1958 she was living in California.

[NI1297] Mary Frances sailed for America in 1927, but returned shortly afterwards.

[NI1311] Alf became the proprietor of The Hydro Hotel in Kilkee in 1946. Shortly after the death of his father in 1951 his business failed and he declared bankruptcy. He turned to his first cousin, Ciss Waldron, for financial support. He married Joan in 1944 (by his second cousin Father Stephen Clancy) but divorced in November 1955.

[NI1323] Michael is a Lieutenant in the Irish Army.

[NI1328] Con worked for the Customs and Excise in Dublin, Ireland. He and his wife lived at 137 Carrigwood, Firhouse, Dublin, Ireland.

[NI1339] Patricia was a teacher. She was living in Galway in 1981.

[NI1347] Michael was a solicitor. He practiced as Ignatius M. Houlihan & Son, Ennis, Co. Clare taking over the practice on his father's retirement.

[NI1351] B.C.L. LI.B

[NI1353] Deidre was a teacher living in England.

[NI1354] Peter was a Reverand Father.

[NI1361] Sister Mary Gabriel

[NI1363] Catherine became a nun in the Order of St. Louis.

[NI1368] Mary died when she was 12.

[NI1370] Sir Paget Bourke became the attorney general of the Seychelles and later the Chief Justice of Cyprus. In the latter role he submitted an official report on an incident on 12 June 1958, in which eight innocent and unarmed Greek Cypriot civilians from Kondemenos Village were murdered by TMT terrorists near the Turkish village of Geunyelie.

[NI1371] John Paget-Bourke started his career as a banker, and he became a Managing Director of the Bank of Ireland. He became a non-executuve director of the Irish Permanent Buildign Society in April 1992, and became Chairman on 19 April 1993. He became Joint Chairman of the board of Irish Life & Permanent PLC after the merger of the two companies.

[NI1378] George was an accomplished athlete and played international rugby, representing Ireland. He worked for the Bank of Ireland and he was killed in a bank raid in Tipperary in 1933.

[NI1386] He became Father Dennis O'Dea.

[NI1388] Susan was an ex girlfriend of Michael Collins, the founder of the IRA. This was confirmed in a document called Peader Clancy Summer School, in which it says 'Michael Collins's first girlfriend was Susan Killeen from Co. Clare, a highly intelligent girl who obtained scholarships and worked with Collins in the Post Office in London. At the outbreak of World War 1, she came back to work in a Dublin bookshop. The romance foundered. Collins returned to take part in the 1916 Rising. Although their romance was on the rocks, she gave immense help to Collins during the period 1918 to 1921. Susan Killeen was working in an Ennis Bank when Collins was shot. Around 1924, she married Cranny man Denis O'Shea. They went to live in Longford and they were buried there. Susan Killeen was born at Moloskey House in Mullagh. She was a niece of Dr. Blackall of Kildysart.' Tim Pat Coogan's biography of Michael Collins also contains a number of references to his relationship with Susan Killeen.

[NI1410] Mary received an MBE in 1955 'in recognition of outstanding services to the community of ACT, particularly in the filed of obstetrics.'

[NI1411] Robert was a Captain in the Australian Air Force during World War II and became a barrister-at-law in Canberra.

[NI1427] George was educated at Clongowes and became a Medical Officer at the Eltham & Mottingham Hospitals in London and Kent. He was living in Moat Road, Eltham, London SE9 in 1976.

[NI1428] Anne Mary "Nancy" and her husband, Friday, inherited the Blackall estates at Killard from her aunt, Miss Massie Blackall. They were childless and in 1963 sold the family estates to various neighbors including Mary Sean Nora Kelly's brother, and they moved to Blackrock in Dublin. Her husband Friday, took his name from a racehorse he once owned in his native New Zealand.

[NI1434] Robert served with the British army in India and Africa and retired as Captain. His address in 1976 was 20 Wheatfield Road, Harpenden, Herts, England.

[NI1438] Thomas was left most of the property of his uncle General Sir Thomas Kelly-Kenny.

[NI1441] William was educated at Trinity College, Dublin and graduated in 1942, and became a Medical Doctor. In 1994 he was living at Dunseverick, 20 Crossparks, Datrmouth, Devon, TQ6 9HP.

[NI1456] Myra died of TB as a young lady, whie she was in training to be a nurse.

[NI1460] Brian died in a drowning incident.

[NI1470] Tom was a reporter from Shannon, Co. Clare.

[NI1484] J J Kelly of Finure was a very popular and well respected member of the West Clare horse and cattle community. He owned the extensive Finure farm overlooking neighboring townlands and the Atlantic Ocean. A noted figure in the horse industry in west Clare for many years, he was a founder and chairman of the West Clare Breeders' Association, aimed at promoting the half-bred brood mare. He also had a keen interest in showjumping and owned his own jumper, Finure David, that one competitions in Clare, Cavan and Galway. J J also kept cattle on his farm and was a valued memeber of the Clare Agricultural Show Society. As a shorthorn breeder and owner of limousin cattle, he won many prizes at shows. He died at age 74 in Ennis Hospital and was survived by his wife, Monica, brothers Christy and Timmy and a sister, Mary.

[NI1485] TImothy, known as young Timmy, inherited Fortview from his uncle Timmy, who died without children. There are now about 230 acres of land at Fortview. 135 acres are in the main land and another 100 in the forestry.

[NI1589] They had a shop at Cree Cross for some time and emigrated to the USA.

[NI1635] Michael took over the farm at Tillagower.

[NI1636] Simon married at home. Paddy lived near Kilrush, Margaret became Mrs Madigan, Carnacalla, and Norah become Mrs O'Brien, Carnanes. All others emigrated.

[NI1637] Batt was a publicam in Henry Street, Kilrush, and had a small farm at Cappa. Of his children, Batt joined the navy, Willie emigrated and Jim died a Christian Brother. Batt and his wife are buried in Scattery Island.

[NI1638] Maria, Anna and Agnes died in Kilkoe, unmarried. All others emigrated.

[NI1639] William received a third of the Leitrim estate from his father. He aslo received the house and lands at Crossfield. He later bought farms at Knockera, Carnans and Dreaffa, and he increased his holding by 16 acreas at Ballinagunn and Cree. He died at the ripe old age of 85 (his wife was 98 when she died). He left an estate of over 900 acres at Frurror with seven tenants thereon.

[NI1641] Bartholomew lived on a farm of 125 acres at Leitrim. He also owned a farm of 80 acres at Crossfield, Cree.

[NI1643] John and his wife Quinn, had one daughter who died young. They left Crossfield and they emigrated.

[NI1645] Batt received one third of the Leitrim estate from his father. After his wife died, he emigrated to America, leaving the farm and children in the care of his brother, Liam Batt.

[NI1646] James received a third of the Leitrim estate from his father. All of his children were unmarried except Mrs Reidy. On his death, his third of the Leitrim farm went to Mr McGrath of Kilkee, who later sold it Breen of Cooracalre.

[NI1806] He was a blacksmith in Co. Mayo until his emigration to the USA.

[NI1815] Batt lived with his wife at the home in Tullagower.

[NI1826] Terry's uncle, Rev. Patrick O'Kelly, left the properties of Balloughera and Ballylean to Terry and to his mother (Patrick's sister), Honoria.

[NI1940] Frances became a nun and lived in Essex, England.

[NI1945] The oldest record we have of the Kelly family family in Dysert is on a head stone in the old ruined church at Dysert in Co. Clare. The inscription reads, "God rest the soul of Darby Kelly died 11 July 1787, Erected by his son, Patrick." Darby lived in Drummina (which means 'little hills'). Drummina is a fine farm location in the townlands of Dysert, nestling into the northern flank of a hill, with a view of the Burren hills opposite. Dysert is a beautiful and ancient settlement in lush green pasture and hill country, about eight miles north of Ennis, in County Clare. A clear shallow river runs through the district from Loch Ballycullinan, and there are at least two ancient wells which provide sweet water, and an ancient Bronze Age burial chamber, the Mollaneen wedge tomb, which dates from about 1500 B.C. The first known name of the settlement was Dysert Tola, after St. Tola who founded his church here in the 8th Century. It is a deeply historic site: in 1318 A.D. at the Battle of Dysert O'Dea, the local O'Deas, one of the most powerful clans of Clare at the time, and who had been dominant there since the 9th century, broke the power of the Normans in the region (then known as Thomond), stopping the advance of Richard de Clare into Clare, killing him in the battle, and holding back the English thrust into Munster for over two centuries. Religious friction was a running sore in the district. This district was in many ways the front line where traditional Gaelic Catholicism and Tudor and Stuart Protestantism met face on. In 1649 Cromwell's lieutenant and son-in-law Ireton (the man who signed the death warrant for Charles I) arrived in Dysert. The local O'Brien lord, Lord lnchiquin, had been implicated with several other Old Irish lords in rebellion against Cromwell's government in 1648; Cromwell's campaign in response was brutal and effectively ended for good Irish resistance to English political control. When Cromwell's forces arrived in the district, fighting was vicious - a bitter siege of Limerick, 25 miles to the south, left no less than 5,000 townspeople, either killed by the battle or by plague which broke out. Not surprisingly, after Limerick surrendered, retribution by Ireton's men in Clare - including Dysert O'Dea - was severe. After Clare Castle surrendered as well, the Cromwellians went on up to the Burren, a few miles north of Dysert O'Dea, where Ireton famously reported 'there is not water enough to drown a man, wood enough to hang one, nor earth enough to bury him.' With the issuing of the Penal Laws in 1704, which seriously curtailed the freedoms and rights of Catholics, all 'Popish priests remaining in the county' had to declare themselves, their abode and two sureties to their good behaviour. In Dysert O'Dea the Parish priest was Donagh Kelly - the only Kelly listed then as a Parish priest in Clare. Kelly's had started to appear in Dysert during the 17th century. Darby was either a grandson of the Kellys who settled there after the Baftle of Kinsale in 1602 or a grandson of Kellys who had moved there after the Cromwellian Settlement, or possibly a son of Kellys who moved there after the Baftle of Aughrim in the 1690's. What we are certain of is that Darby Kelly, who was born early in the 18th century, lived in Drummina and was buried in Dysert in 1787. Our earliest knowledge of Drummina is from just before the Cromwellian occupation of the district. At some time the house and land were part of the Molaneen estate. After Cromwell's occupation and confiscation of lands, Drummina was taken from the Earl of lnchiquin. When Charles II was restored to the throne in 1660, lnchiquin managed to get his political power and his former estates restored to him, including Drummina. He had some 60,000 acres in Clare, Limerick, Tipperary and Cork. Early in the 1700's Drummina came into the hands of the Kelly's who had moved to the area from Ballinasloe. We know that Darby Kelly occupied Drummina and we know that his Grandson, Jeremiah "old Jer" bequeathed it in 1882. Interestingly, Darby's grandson, Timothy Kelly, was evicted from Drummina in the 1820s. Darby married Bridget Harrington and they had at least two children, Patrick and Richard. Darby dies and was buried at the old church at Dysert. Even though it is now in a terrible state of repair, this is a very atmospheric and beautiful place. There are some twenty graves set into the floor of the church - we can only surmise that these were important people in Dysert O'Dea.

[NI1947] Richard and his brother Patrick, inherited property at Drummina. Unfortunately Richard died in 1820, leaving the farms to his son Timothy, who was evicted in the mid 1820's.

[NI1948] Timothy's father, Richard died at a young age, leaving Timothy his farm at Drummina in 1820. Several years later Timothy and his family were evicted from Drummina, and they had to move to the Parish of Kilmaley. By all accounts, Timothy was well able to pay his rent, so money was not the cause of the eviction. It is known that there were serious religious conflicts in Dysert O'Dea during this time, caused by religious tensions, evictions and harrassment of tenants. It is said that the night before the eviction, Timothy, having learned that the house of a local man called Powell was to be burned, warned the Powells, while being threatened by a police pistol through the open window. The house was duly burned, but Mrs Powell was seen the next day, so was known to have survived. Another possibility exicts. If as was fairly common in that period, Timothy had married 'the wrong woman', he could well have been pressured to leave Dysert O'Dea and set up afresh. Little is known about his wife Anne Mullins, beyond her birth and death dates, but Timothy's son, Thomas Kelly told his daughter May, on discovering a bricked-up separate doorway to the house, when carrying out building work, that his mother was "not good enough for"Lady Mullins, who had had a separate door opened to her room, in her widowhood, so as to be able to avoid her daughter-in-law. At the time of the 'eviction', a farm in the townland of Knockadangan in the Parish of Kilmaley, five miles away to the west, became available, as the current occupants were returning to Ulster. Timothy Kelly agreed the tenancy and paid one pound for the goodwill of the house and farm, receiving the traditional one pound in return 'for luck'. We know from the tithe records that Timothy was in occupation by 1826. The building was a traditional Western Ireland farmhouse, with the main door opening into the kitchen with the large open fireplace, where the family ate. To the right on entering, behind the kitchen fireplace, lay the better room, at the West end of the house, to where traditionally the aged parents would move to live when their son took over the running of the farm. To the left side of the kitchen were two separate bedrooms, and above the kitchen was a loft, reached by a flight of stairs near the door. The stone-built house was roofed with thatch, and at the east gable end was a small shed for the horse and probably pig they would keep. The house stands in the curve of a lane, sited on a low hill just above a fresh running stream, which would have provided water from time immemorial and would probably have been an ancient settlement as it is in a privileged sheltered spot, only fifty yards from a Clearwater lake from which the stream runs. It is a supremely peaceful and welcoming spot, near to the other farms in Kilmaley, but independent in its position. The growth is lush there and the hedgerows tower over the narrow lanes. When the family arrived the next day, however, they found the house burned out. Though jealous neighbors have been blamed, it is hard to overlook the link with the tensions and burning in Dysert O'Dea. Timothy reroofed the house, put it back in order and moved in to work the farm. Knockadangan would remain home to Timothy Kelly and his descendants for some 170 years, right down to 1995, when Mary Crowe (ne Kelly), his great granddaughter and the last of this Kelly line left in Ireland, had to leave to move into hospital care in Ennis, at the age of 84. Meanwhile the Kelly's of Drummina were becoming increasingly important farmers at Dysert and some separation opened up between them and their Kelly relatives in Knockadangan. By 1837 the "state of agriculture was gradually improving", so these were quite promising times to be starting out as a new farmer in Kilmaley. The Kelly family used the chapel at the ancient settlement at Kilmaley a mile or so from the house, and Timothy's son Tommy and all of his family are buried there. Ennis, six miles to the East, the nearest town and the main market for Kilmaley, with a population of some 10,000 in the early 1840s, was still in 1842 described by the novelist Thackeray as a 'remote little town'. It was no beauty, described in 1844 as having 'a very shabby and even poor and disorderly appearance'. The name Knockadangan comes from the Gaelic 'Cnoc a Daingean', meaning 'A stronghold'. In 1826 Timothy Kelly and his wife Anne Mullins were farming 13.5 Irish acres (about 22 English acres) at Knockadangan. Timothy and Anne may well have moved away from the conflict at Dysert O'Dea, but Kilmaley was not immune from the same sort of tensions. Although most of the year consisted of the hard round of farming chores, the countryfolk also knew how to take advantage of markets and fairs to let their hair down a little. In 1834 Fr Daniel Lynch, Parish priest of Kilmaley, applied at Ennis petty sessions for the fair at nearby Connolly to be supressed, as it was, he claimed 'merely a scene of drunkenness, rioting and insubordination, where vice and profligacy were practised and encouraged.' The Kellys' landlord, Richard Stacpoole, was one of the local landed gentry who sought to discipline such a state of affairs. In 1828 Richard and Andrew Stacpoole were members of the Grand Jury at Ennis Assizes which, among other sentences in the first week of August, handed down a 7-year transportation order to Botany Bay in Australia for one Daniel King who was found guilty of stealing. Timothy and Anne raised their children bilingual in Irish and English, and they were known to be well educated. As such we presume the parents to be bilingual too. In 1845-48 the Great Famine struck this region in particularly devastating fashion. The Kellys of Knockadangan survived it. Timothy and Anne had several children, leaving the farm at Knockadangan to son Thomas.




[NI1950] Kitty descended from Patrick Kelly and Chuck Brew.

[NI1951] Tommy Kelly and his wife are the current occupiers of the property at Drummina , Co. Clare.

[NI1965] Kitty died of meningitus while attrending high school in Tulla at 16 years old.

[NI1968] Mary Rose met Oliver at College. She teaches music and is an accomplished pianist and organist.

[NI1986] Patrick inherited the lands of Clohaninchy from his Mother who was left it in the will of Father Patrick O'Kelly. He died in 1858 and his will was proved on July 14, 1859.

[NI2008] Francis was born in Ballykett, Co. Clare, Ireland in 1806, and became the Coroner for West Clare. He obtained an inheritance from Simon O'Donnell. He was involved in the wreck of the ship, The Edmond, in Kilkee Bay, on November 19, 1850.

[NI2012] According to the research report of Paddy Waldron, Alice Jane O'Donnell married Richard Blood O'Donnell, and not his brother as shown here.

[NI2020] Noreen was a SRN.

[NI2021] Agnes was a teacher.

[NI2023] Vera was a teacher.

[NI2028] Arthur was a teacher.

[NI2029] Mary, like her husband, was a teacher.

[NI2043] Kate and her mother left the family home in Doonmore in October 1918, six months after Kate's niece, Louise Kelly married Martin Hayes. They bought a house at 3 Victoria Terrace in Kilkee. After her mother's death on November 23, 1920, Kate left Kilkee and went to stay with the Blackall's in Dublin.

[NI2053] Reverand Father Niall Hayes. He wrote a genealogic report on the Kellys.

[NI2084] John Joe inherited the land and the shop. His son John Carey now lives in the pub at Kilmihil.

[NI2085] John currently lives in the "pub" at Kilmihil, which he inherited for his father.

[NI2089] Tim was the clerk of the Kilrush Union and secretary of the Board of Guardians.

[NI2099] May and Michael ran a shop & creamery in Kilkee. Her two daughters, Breda and Maura married the Haugh brothers from Kilkee.

[NI2102] Delia was a nun (Sister Albertine).

[NI2106] John was a well known fireman in Dunmore Creamery for many years. He had a shop on the corner of the Doonbeg Road, just as you turn right for the golf club opposite the Garda station.

[NI2107] Breda and Michael retired from their shop and run a bed and breakfast in the west end of Kilkee, called Dun Erin. Their son Damien now runs the shop.

[NI2108] Maura and Bernard spend many years between Chicago and Kilrush, where the run the pitch and putt club at the West End, and aslo their B&B "Duggeana House" in the West End of Kilkee - next door to Breda and Michael.

[NI2109] They retired from their shop in Kilkee and ran a B&B called Dun Erin, in the West End of Kilkee.

[NI2123] Living in Kilrush.

[NI2141] Catherine was the Aunt of Colonel Kelly-Kenny.

[NI2149] Gearoid, eldest son of Michael and Clare, was born in 1956. He spent an idyllic childhhod at his ancestral home, Bromehill, which has been a residence since the surrounding town of Kilrush was built. Gearoid began his career in the hotel and restaurant business. He owned and operated a number of restaurants and hotels in Ireland and the USA. Although he returned to Ireland where he retired, he continueds to have an interest in property in the USA. Gearoid inherited a love of animals, especially horses, from his father, who was a renowned breeder of horses and pedigree cattle.

[NI2162] Was a road contractor in Co. CLare, Ireland. Bought Broomehill House.

[NI2174] In the 1855 Griffith's Primary Valuation of Lands and Tenements, it was shown that Timothy and Stephen were the occupiers of a 72 acre house, office and land in the Clonina townland, leased to them by John O'Kelly. This was shown to have a valuation of 12 pounds. Timothy and Kate were evicted from their tenement in Clonina and settled in Dromelihy.

[NI2176] He was a (M.P.) Member of Parliament.

[NI2186] In the 1855 Griffith's Primary Valuation of Lands and Tenements, it was shown that Stephen and Timothy were the occupiers of a 72 acre house, office and land in the Clonina townland, leased to them by John O'Kelly. This was shown to have a valuation of 12 pounds.

[NI2211] The Reverand Father Vivian Hayes.

[NI2314] Francis, of 51 George Street, Limerick, was the proprietor of the Munster News, a newspaper now extinct.

[NI2317] Randal was the last known owner of Querin House, Kilrush, Co. Clare, Ireland. His father may have changed his name to Couhinan, and as such Richard may be Richard Counihan.

[NI2320] Margaret died while she was at school at the Sacred Heart Convent in Roscrea.

[NI2336] Richard became a soldier and fought in the Marlboro' wars. In October 1697 Richard lost an arm and received a facial wound from a musket ball during the Marlborough wars in Germany, at the battle of Ebeanburg. For these injuries Richard recieved 100 pounds from the king and awarded a pension. He and his father, Elias, obtained their Irish Nationalization in 1698. When he retired he was made the Town Mayor of Dublin.

[NI2337] William's two eldest sons were killed in the navy, leaving Randal as the sole survivor.

[NI2339] Randal served in the British army and became a J.P for Clare in 1755.

[NI2340] Richard became a partner in the banking firm of Borough and Arnott, who were naval agents in Ireland. He later became a Baronet and was known as Sir Richard Borough.

[NI2342] Commander William Borough came to live in Querrin, in a house he had rebuilt on its present site near the garden. The senior branch of the family having moved to Cappagh House, Kilrush. After his wife, Catherine died, the old Commander William married his cook, and she had a family. One of these children married a man called Murray, whose daughter married Edmond Griffin, who living along the shore in the late part of the 1800's.

[NI2343] He was a barrister at law, and built Bellevue House, near Cappagh House.

[NI2346] Before he was 21, Randal ran away with and married a very pretty girl, Margaret Griffin, whose father was a tenant and a Catholic. The result was that Randal was disowned by his family. However, he had some property of his own in Galway and managed to survive until his father died. At this time he took possession of Querrin. Later he was able to buy back a good slice of the family estate, when the Cappagh family went broke. They lived at Querin Lodge. They were unfortuante and it fell into the hands of the O'Doherty's who foreclosed on them. Randal and Margaret had a large family, four of whom went to America. Elizabeth was the eldest and she married Michael Behan. Jane married Francis Counihan, William married Harriet Healy and had a son, Randal who inherited Querin. Randal owned 569 acres of Querin House lands in 1878, of which almost 60 adjoined the house itself. Refer to "The Borough Family of Querrin" by M.M Wright, in "The Other Clare" Vol 9, April 1985.

[NI2352] Elie was pastor, first at Fontenay, France and subsequently at La Rochelle, France. His family was prominent amongst the Protestants of La Rochelle, before being persecuted because of his beliefs.

[NI2353] When Jean's parents escaped for England, she was left behind as a babe in arms. However, shortly afterwards, Elias risked his life and returned to France, to bring Jean, and his son, back to England. Jean afterwards received a Scholarship D.D. at Trinity College, Dublin at 16 years old.

[NI2354] When her parents escaped for England, she was imprisoned in a French convent, where she later died.

[NI2355] When his parents escaped for England, this son was left behind. However, shortly afterwards, Elias risked his life and returned to France, to bring his son and a daughter, Jean, back to England.

[NI2356] This son died on a tour of duty with his father , Elias, who was travelling as Secretary to Cox.

[NI2359] May have lost his life at a battle in the Marlborough Wars.

[NI2452] Baron Hugh Lacy was the 5th Baron Lacy, the 1st Lord Deputy of Ireland. It was from his second marriage to Rose, daughter of Roderic O'Connor, King of Connacht, Peter was born.

[NI2454] Roderick was the King of Connacht.

[NI2457] Patrick was born and raised in Drummina, Dysert, and inherited much of the lands at Drummina when his father, Darby Kelly, died in 1787. Patrick married Chuck Brew and had 12 children, and they were fortunate to prosper through a very rough period. The late 1700s and early 1800s, which was a very troubled time in the Dysert area, caused by religious tensions, evictions and harassment of tenants. This was compounded by the fact that by the 1820's farming conditions were becoming very hard, and famine was said to have affected the area through the failure of the potato crop. Even Sir Edward O'Brien, representative for Clare in parliament, was moved there to declare that 70,000 people were in distress, and a visitor to Ennis wrote: "Wringing distress has compelled thousands of poor to part with nearly all of their clothes, and the entire of their furniture: all the peasantry are ragged, if not naked, and many have neither pot nor saucepan left to boil their potatoes in." In the mid 1820s another conflict tore the community apart. At the centre of the conflict was the Synge family of Dysert O'Dea. From the mid 18th century, the Synges became major landowners in Dysert O'Dea. Of Protestant stock, Nicholaus Synge, the Bishop of Kilialoe from 1746 to 1771, got a lease of 2,920 acres of church land. In 1753 he united the diocese of Kilialoe and Kilfenora which straddled southern Clare. He was the fifth and last in the line of a family of Church of Ireland episcopal bishops. His great grandson Edward took over the running of Dysert O'Dea lands in 1823. Occupying Carhue House, which still stands in the village, Edward apparently experienced a life change and became a fundamentalist Protestant evangelist who placed the reading of the Bible above all other religious considerations. He established the Dysert O'Dea school which became known as the 'soup school' and tried hard to convert the local tenants to Protestantism, becoming known as the 'Dysert Proselytizee. He built three schools, at Dysert, Rath and Corofin, and bribed or threatened parents to send their children to his schools, offering money, food and clothing. For uncooperative tenants, he called in rent arrears, refused leases , increased rents and threatened eviction. This provoked a lot of tensions, including the burning of the 'soup school' in 1826. Great conflict and serious violence surrounded Synge and the school. His attitude to the local people was abrasive, as he discovered people loyal to the Pope and to the Gaelic language. He saw the cure as rational education, Protestant enlightenment, and an end to 'Romish' beliefs. The core of his school curriculum was Bible study. The local Catholic priests became hostile and in the Spring of 1826 the Dysert O'Dea schoolhouse was set on fire. For the local people of Dysert O'Dea, religion, education, land and tenure became tightly interwoven in a climate of terror and fear. During the next few years, evictions and harassment, violence and intimidation continued apace. Sometime in the late 1820's a nephew of Patrick's, Timothy Kelly, was evicted from his property at Drummina and he moved to Kilmaley. The Synge events concluded when on Ash Wednesday 1831, shots were fired at Synge as he travelled through Dysert O'Dea. His young driver, Patrick Donnelan, was killed, but Synge was saved by the bible which he carried in his breast pocket, and which stopped a bullet intended for him. It has been observed that for decades afterwards the scars of the conflict were felt. Because of its length and intensity, the struggle left its mark on folk memory, and was one of a number of major confrontations between 1825 and about 1860 which contributed towards creating a deep attitude of suspicion among the general body of Catholics towards Protestants. A major root of the problem was simple poverty. In the early 1800s Clare was one of the poorest counties in Ireland. In some parts 50% and even 70% of the population lived in one-room mud cabins in 1841. Somehow Patrick and his family survived and prospered through all this, although two of his 12 children were ordained in Rome, but died of Cholera on a ship on their return trip. As for Drummina, we know from the Land Valuation that in 1855 its tenant was Patrick's daughter, Susan Kelly, leasing the farm from the Marquis of Thomond. It was a very substantial 127 acres, with 3 houses on the property. Susan married Michael McMahon, and whose family paid a 250 pound dowry for Michael to marry Susan. Houses in Drummina have remained occupied by Kellys in an unbroken line, right down to the present occupants Thomas and Bernadette, who were descendants of Patrick's son Thomas, who married Bridget Coffey.

[NI2458] Michael Kelly was the son of Jeremiah Kelly. Jeremiah left Michael an annuity of 60 pounds.

[NI2461] Francis was the son of Jeremiah Kelly. Jeremiah left the farms at Ballyallaban and Leminagh and 1000 pounds to Francis.

[NI2462] Susan was the daughter of Jeremiah Kelly. On his death in 1882 he left her the sum of 3000 pounds to be paid on her "approved" marriage or on entering religious community.

[NI2464] Jeremiah Kelly was the son of Jeremiah kelly, "old Jer", who was a descendant of an old south Galway Hy Many family, which had Clare connections for several generations. In about 1860 Old Jer purchased the house and surrounding lands (demesne) of Porte Ruan, which is in the townland of Portlecka in the Parish of Ruan. Old Jer dies in 1882 and left Jeremiah most of his lands and estates. He left Jeremiah the estate at Nuan Porte, Drummina , Paefield, Caherbulolog and Newtown and the farms at Lisdoonvarna, Ballycashin, Lisket, Cloonagh, Deelcu, Faanygalvin, Roxborough, Rathvergin pulloy, and Banlcun. He also left Jeremiah the sum of 4000 pounds. Porte Ruan is still in the hands of Jeremiah's descendants. Porte Ruan, which means the landing place of the trees, is located east of the Ennis Road, less than one mile south of Ruan. The property is still standing and is inhabited. It is an irregular, 17th or 18th century house, with a two-floor, three-bay, 19th century front containing a central front door, facing south over Dromore Lake. It incorporates three specific periods of architectural history. Porte Ruan is approached by a longish drive from the west through a tree-scattered parkland. Nearby is the roadside museum of this branch of the Kelly family.

[NI2465] Gertrude was a niece of Frank Foster, who as married to Jerry's sister, Elizabeth. Her mother, Delia Foster was married to Captain Foster, who died in what was then known as the Gold Coast. Her sister, Kathleen, who is buried in Glasnevin, started Curley Wee in the Irish Independent. Her only brother, Tony, died young. When Gertrude married Yong Jer, her mother, sister and aunt Minnie, all moved to Porte with her. There is a story that Jer wanted to marry Gertrude's younger sister, but didn't realize the mistake until after the ceremony. In those days, the older sister was considered on the shelf once the younger one got married. Jer died in 1893 leaving a widow and 4 children, and expecting a fifth. Gertrude re-married within the year, to Paddy Mellett of Mayo.

[NI2466] John was born on the day that his father was buried.

[NI2470] Jeremiah's uncle, "old Jer" left him the farm at Carhue together with the sum of 500 pounds. Jeremiah received this inheritance in 1882, but was evicited from the propertyin 1888. The Carhue farm was bought by Mr. Hassett who married Jerry's daughter, Bid. The Hassett family are still in Carhue today.

[NI2471] Elizabeth was the daughter of Jeremiah Kelly. On his death in 1882 he left her the sum of 3000 pounds to be paid on her ("approved") marriage or on entering religious community.

[NI2475] Bridget became a Nun, Sister Bonaventure.

[NI2476] Susan became a Nun, Sister Boniface.

[NI2477] James became a priest, and was known as Father Jimmy. He lived in San Francisco, USA.

[NI2478] Patrick was raised in Spancil Hill. Maureen was his brother. There is a story that he stayed at the Clonina House for many years adn was involved in a legal dispute with Bridget Kelly after the death of her uncle.

[NI2479] George was a civil engineer.

[NI2481] Morty was studying to be a priest in Maynooth, when a letter to him from a lady was discovered and he was expelled from the school. He emigrated to the USA, and worked for U. Grant. He died in the US Civil War.

[NI2499] Patsy and his wife and daughter died young in Bealnalicka.

[NI2501] Margaret was the Aunt of the Fine Gael politician, Pat O'Brien.

[NI2503] Morty Kelly was a publican, owning Morty Kelly's Pub. This came into the family when Morty married Statia (who was aunt of Mrs. Clarke of Rockview). He left it to Jimmy and Kathleen.

[NI2514] Thomas was very interested in his family roots, and visited the USA many times, especially during the 60's.

[NI2515] John worked in insurance. His wife was a Doctor in Northampton. Her name may have been Eileen and not Helen.

[NI2526] Becky inheritied Morty Kelly's pub on the death of her brother, Jimmy.

[NI2531] Jerry and Nonie lived in Rineen for a time and later moved to Tarmon, nerar Gort, where they developed a timber business.

[NI2538] When Jeremiah Kelly was evicted from the property at Carhue, Mr. Hasset purchased the property and later married Jeremiah's daughter, Bid.

[NI2547] Morty became a columban priest, who died in Korea in 1990.

[NI2578] Robert drowned when he was 20 years old.

[NI2585] Jeremiah became a Columban priest and served in Korea.

[NI2602] Frances is related to the Kelly's of Dysert, and lived in Ruan, Dysert. She was a science teacher, married to a farmer and most interested in the family genealogy.

[NI2619] Morty Kelly's Pub is now owned again by a Morty Kelly, after the death of his father Jimmy's sister, Becky, who had inheritied it from Morty Kelly, the current owner's Grandfather.

[NI2630] Jimmy inherited Morty Kelly's pub.

[NI2636] John was sponsored by his aunt Elizabeth Kelly and his uncle Jeremiah Kelly.

[NI2637] John was killed in a road accident at Dromoland, Co. Clare.

[NI2684] Annie was baptised on March 19th 1873, just five days after her brother, Thomas, died; she must have been born almost as her brother was dying in an adjacent room. Annie's sponsor at her baptism was John Kelly her older brother. For a 13 year old John it must have been a very hard time: his new baby sister Annie had to replace his baby brother Thomas, whose loss just when he was blossoming into a person must have left a big hole in the family. So we can imagine that Annie was given lots of affection to heal the wound of her brothers death. Annie emigrated to Lowell, Massachusetts, USA, but returned with her sister Mary, to help run the family farm. Mary went back to America again after the death, eventually to enter a convent; Annie, however, stayed to help her father with the farm after her mother's death. Nine years later (and 3 months after her brother Thomas married) she married, to Police Constable Patrick Joseph Kerin of Louisburgh County Mayo. They married in Ennis Cathedral - interestingly, not in Kilmaley church. Perhaps because P.J. was a policeman there was a certain kudos in marrying in the grander, though still quite modest, cathedral. Two weddings in three months was unprecedented for Knockadangan! - the last had been 44 years earlier, way back in 1858, when Thomas Kelly married Bridget Lafferty.

[NI2687] In 1858, at the age of 30, Thomas Kelly married Bridget Lafferty, who was 22. From the Griffith Evaluation Survey of 1855, we know that Thomas Kelly had taken over as tenant from Timothy (then aged 76), leasing his land from Richard Stacpoole of Edenvale who owned the Knockadangan farmlands and was then one of the largest landowners in Clare, owning over 8,000 acres in total. Thomas Kelly's Knockadangan property was the third largest in the townland, with 22 English acres, but it was also easily the most valuable of the eight properties. The rateable value of the house was twice that of the next most valuable. Thomas was just 17 years old when the Great Famine of 1845-1848 struck in the Kilmaley and Miltown Malbay districts. Four people starved to death in nearby Miltown Malbay in June 1846. In July a 'poor fellow died near Kilmaley, after eating only cabbage leaves for months and 'in the end being so revolted by this fare that he could not bring himself to eat any more'. Unrest spread as the Autumn of 1846 wore on and the ravages of hunger and sickness worsened. Meetings took place between large groups of emaciated people who discussed how to get employment and who expressed their anger towards the gentry and the large farmers. In late December there was the first great wave of starvation deaths in the district. By early January it was reported that epidemic disease had appeared in Kilmaley, and was 'already traversing with great strides'. In January 1847 John MacMahon, Parish priest of Miltown Malbay, painted a very grim picture of the situation in the district: 'The deaths in my Parish are terribly on the increase. New shops for the manufacture of coffins have been recently opened, and the men are at work all night, as I have been informed, making them. I have seen seven coffins in the course of two hours, and on another occasion counted five passing my own door leading to one direction and they were of the rudest make and finish that I had ever seen before, which proves that poverty and death are going hand in hand. There was no attempt at painting them. So great a change in the funeral ceremonial of the people requires little comment, for it is evident that nothing less than extreme poverty could suddenly produce such a revolution in the Irish peasant who has been at all times remarkable for celebrating the obsequies of his deceased relative in a style disproportioned to his means, and not sanctioned by prudence, however honourable it may be to his heart and warm affections'. The winter of 1847 was the worst time, with severe dysentery common in the workhouse in Ennis. In January 1847 nearly all the main roads of Clare had been uprooted to create work for public works schemes to employ the starving 'usefully' at a rate of 8 pence per day. 53,000 workers were employed on road-building projects in the county, which resembled a massive building site. This represented no less than 20% of the population of the county - and the figure rose to 70,000 (25%) later in the Spring. In 1848 the potato crop continued to suffer. In June 1849 the Parish priest of Kilmaley wrote that of the 770 families in occupation at the beginning of 1847, some of them with large farms, only 398 were still holding out, and that many of these were 'fast falling into the pit of poverty and misery which is dug at their doors by absentee landlords and cruel agents' . We can only presume that the experience of surviving these three years of hunger and death all around him left a permanent imprint on Thomas's outlook. For a short time in the mid 1850s, conditions for the farmers of the area improved somewhat; but as Bridget and Thomas were starting to raise a family they had to endure hard times again. From 1858 harvests worsened, and in 1861 and 1862 the potato crop failed again. It was reported that there were many small farmers dependent on tillage in those parishes 'who have not put anything by to meet such a crisis as the present'. Their other crops were failing too, except for oats, but which were of a poor quality.. The price of turf rose four-fold, and many farmers were seen returning from Ennis market having sold their oats. There were another three years of hunger and distress between 1861 and 1864, with the Ennis workhouse filling up again, and more deaths from starvation. The first three children of Bridget and Thomas were bom in those years. When Bridget moved into Knockadangan, she took over not only the sharing of the running of the house and the farm with Thomas, but also the caring for ageing parents-in-law. When she and Thomas married, his father Timothy was 79 and his mother Anne 70. But Bridget clearly had energy and enthusiasm, and brought a new life to Knockadangan. She and Thomas would have eight children in the twenty years between 1859 and 1879, and seven of them would survive into adult life - no mean feat in the circumstances of the time. However, six of those seven would emigrate to America, leaving just one to carry on the farm, and one of the six who emigrated, Annie, would return to Knockadangan to pick up her Irish roots again. The couple had three sons in their first five years. Just fourteen months after their marriage, when Bridget was 23 and Thomas 31, their first child, John, was born, in August 1859. The house must have been full and lively, with old grandparents Timothy and Anne still alive, Thomas and Bridget, and the three boys who in 1868, aged 9,7 and 4, must have been quite a handful. For old man Timothy, his joy at seeing his first grand-daughter, Mary, was perhaps the last pleasure of his long life. He started to decline with old age shortly after she was born, and died just before Christmas that year, on December 13th 1868, aged 89. His widow Anne, then 80, mourned the husband with whom she had shared some fifty years of marriage, but had the consolation of seeing baby Mary born. In 1876 Thomas and Bridget were alone in the house with their children, all the older family members gone for the first time in the eighteen years since their marriage. There had been four deaths in the house in seven years, but now they could look forward. The boys would be growing fast, and were no doubt active around the farm. There were a lot of mouths to feed, and there would be room only for one of the boys to take over the farm; there would be some difficult decisions to come. After the death of Bridget in 1893, Thomas carried on, helped by his son Thomas, who must have taken over the running of the farm in the 1890s. It is interesting that the three elder boys, John, Patrick, and Martin, and the youngest boy Timothy, did not take over the running of the farm, but instead went to America. They probably left in the late 1880s or early 1890s, and would be part of the mass post-Famine exodus taking place from Clare and the whole of the West of Ireland in those years. We know that the two girls, Mary and Annie, were also in America at about this time, both in Lowell where their Lafferty cousins were also established, where many emigrants from the Ennis area went to work in the textile mills, and where Martin Kelly lived and his first child Alice was born in 1898. In 1914 Thomas Kelly died, aged 86, 'having suffered apoplexy for 4 days'. He had outlived Bridget by 21 years. Son Thomas was present when he died, and then took over the running of the farm. It is interesting that Thomas and Bridget were both buried in Dysert O'Dea, returning to the place where his father had been 'evicted' nearly a century earlier. The thread with Dysert O'Dea had clearly not been broken. Their grave with its black polished headstone, inscribed 'Thomas Kelly and Bridget Kelly' is set in the floor of the ruined 12th century church, just inside the remarkable and celebrated carved stone doorway with its arch of animal and human heads. The tomb is grouped with the tombs of Richard Kelly who died in the 1820s, and Darby Kelly who died in 1787.

[NI2688] In 1858, at the age of 22, Bridget Lafferty married Thomas Kelly. Bridget was from Letterkelly, a townland similar in size to Knockadangan, some ten miles westward on the road to the coast at Miltown Malbay. The Lafferty name appears to be derived originally from O'Flaherty. 'Lefterkelly' is an anglicization of the Gaelic'Leitir Coille' meaning 'The marsh beside the wood' which is a very appropriate description still. The Lafferty farm was some two miles from Miltown Malbay. The Laffertys farmed land owned by Frederick Callaghan. Bridget's parents Edmond and Mary had 56 acres of rough country - more than twice as much as the Kellys of Knockadangan, but in general much poorer land. The farm stands on an exposed hillside opposite the northern flank of Mount Callan, at 1,200 feet the highest point in west Clare, up above a slope running down to the coast at Miltown Malbay, and it is fortunate to have its own sweet freshwater spring rising on the hillside above. It is beautiful, wild, but difficult country to farm. Bridget (known as Biddy), apparently a tall and imposing young woman, left the exposed boggy moorland of Lefterkelly, for the gentler, lusher country of Knockadangan. It appears that Bridget's experience was common to that of many daughters of farming families in this part of Clare. One description of the district in the 1930s commented on how since way back in the Nineteenth Century 'marriages in this Parish have shown a tendency to move brides from the westward out of the poorer lands eastward towards richer farms ... In general, the higher and more westerly townlands of the area made up of this Parish and contiguous parishes are the townlands from which marriages have moved brides outward .. families have consistently paid higher dowries to establish their girls on better lands near urban and shopping centres ... These families have married their daughters along the country roads downward and eastward, from the higher, poorer more westerly townlands to the better lands in lower and more eastwardly ones...' Bridget had survived the Great Famine of 1845-1848. She was 9 when it began. This part of County Clare suffered particularly badly when the potato crop failed through blight. Bridget died in 1893 at the young age of 57, after suffering for five months from a liver disease.

[NI2689] John was the oldest child and it must have taken quite a strain on him to see his mother, still only 36, give birth to a daughter and lose a son in the same week. It is hardly surprising that many years later, John, having made his life in America, was the only brother to visit Knockadangan from America and the one to erect the headstone on Bridget and Thomas's grave in Dysert O'Dea church. John had apparently always kept with him in America the frieze coat his mother had knitted for him, and had hoped to be returned to Clare to be buried with it when he died. His wishes were not granted. Apart from the return of Annie and Mary for their mothers death in 1893, and a visit from John in 1931 we do not know that any of them returned to visit. Letters were exchanged, up to at least 1980, but by the mid 90's all contact had gone. In contrast to the sad ending of the Kelly line in Knockadangan, some of the Kellys at least in America prospered and bore many offspring. The exact motives of John Kelly and his siblings in emigrating to America remain hidden to us now. However, they were part of a massive exodus from Western Ireland in the 1880s and 1890s. As opportunity expanded in the post-Civil War United States, especially as the Eastern states industrialised and the cities expanded, immigrants were welcomed. At the same time, back in Ireland things for many had not really got much better in the four decades after the Famine. In the Kilmaley region of County Clare, the landlord class remained powerful and resented, while the small farmers struggled, with little prospect of an easier life or prosperity. The Kelly's were fairly substantial farmers by comparison with many others, but they still had to contend with insecurity, the vagaries of the climate, lack of capital and all the limitations of a subsistence economy. We have glimpses of the conditions for both classes in this area in the 1880s when the four Kelly boys and two Kelly girls were deciding to chance their luck in America. John's luck was no better in the USA, and he became the second of Thomas's children's to die, late in the 1930's. He appears to have died single and alone. He died at the hands of a mugger in New York City. The mugger robbed of all his money, and John barely managed to reach his brother Martin's house before collapsing and dying. John was always 'very careful' with his money, and indeed carried it all on his person - which meant that his robbery left him destitute.

[NI2690] Thomas was born in August 1870. At his baptism the sponsors were Michael Haren and Mary Lafferty, his mothers elder sister - so the connection with Letterkelly was a strong one, and the two families must have had quite a lot to do with each other. Poor Thomas, however, at the age of 2 years and 7 months, died of croup, in the Spring of 1873, on March 14th. On January 30th 1853 a Michael Haren married Ellen Kelly in Kilmaley church; their witnesses were John O'Connor and James Kelly (possibly the James Kelly who died in 1895 - then aged 42?). After their marriage, Michael Haren and Ellen Kelly lived on the Haren farm at Lefterkelly, and then had seven children - Mary (1855), Margaret (1858), Bridget (1860), Catherine (1861), James (1863), Thomas (1865) and Winifred (1868). It seems quite possible that Ellen Kelly would have been a daughter of Timothy Kelly: the children listed above would have been cousins of the Knockadangan children.

[NI2691] Jeremiah was born in County Clare about 1812. When he married Mary Baker, the daughter of a tenant he was disinherited. Jeremiah's brother, John, emigrated to Australia in 1850, and persuaded Jeremiah and his wife, Mary, to follow him there in 1852. Records show that Jeremiah Kelly and Mary Baker arrived on the Phoebe Dunbar boat at Port Adelaide in South Australia on 8th June 1852. They had with them Honor, Patrick, Anne and James. He died 8 years after the family arrived in Australia. The family then went to live in Mintar near Clare, Australia, where they had relatives. Mintar and Clare were in the heart of the South Australian wine growing district, the Clare Valley.

[NI2693] John was living in England in 1990 and was married. He may have a son, Gerrard.

[NI2700] John emigrated to Australia in 1850. He and his wife, Ellen, had 3 children prior to leavign for Australi. A descendant of John's, Kieran Gillan, made a visit to Ireland to see his relatives in July 2000. He is descended from one of John's daughter's Ellen, who joined her parents in Australia when she was 21.

[NI2701] Mary was the daughter of a tenant on Kelly property.

[NI2705] Honor married David McNamara and they settled in Adelaide. They had 5 children.

[NI2706] Patrick married Ellen Brady and they settled in Mt Rufus near Mintaro. They had 9 children.

[NI2708] James married Catherine Erwin and they settled in Hornsdale, north of Jamestown and about 40 miles north from Minatro. His mother and sister, Anne, accompanied him to Hornsdale and they are buried at the nearby cemetry of Appila. James and Catherine had 8 children. They left Hornsdale and moved to Adelaide in 1902.

[NI2716] Anne and Martha were twins.

[NI2721] Lucy became a nun; Sister Ignatius.

[NI2722] Patrick became the Archdeacon Kelly.

[NI2724] Nora became a nun; Sister Mary Dymphna.

[NI2731] James was a Surveyor General.

[NI2787] Barabara was a descendant of James Mann.

[NI2818] Sheilagh was clearly very interested in her family history and is the author of a Family Report used as the primary source for this branch of the Kelly family. As such I presume that it was her brother Kiernan that visited Ireland in 2000 to meet with the Kelly's in Clare.

[NI2821] Petra and Patricia were twins.

[NI2825] Ellen became a nun; Sister Mary Ignatius.

[NI2833] Patrick became a priest and became the editor of the "Southern Cross".

[NI2838] Died aged 2 days.

[NI2839] Moira and her sister Patricia were sisters.

[NI2872] Catherine and Anne were twins, as were her sisters Carmel and Rose.

[NI3004] Martin Kelly quite likely was Timothy's younger brother, 16 years younger than Timothy and uncle to Thomas. He died at Knockadangan after suffering pleurisy for three months. His death certificate described him as a 'paupee, and he was aged 80. It seems he had been living at Knockadangan for at least the past seven years, since he signed (with his mark) on the death certificates as being present at the death of Timothy in 1868 and Anne in 1875.

[NI3005] Anne Mullins descended from the O'Mullan clan who originated in County Galway, not far to the North; their genealogy claimed descent from one Maolan, himself descended from kings of Connacht. Connor, brother of Dathi was said to be the ancestor of O'Maolain; Connor was the son of Dermod Fionn, the 30th Christian king of Connacht. On June 5th 1875, aged 87 year old Anne Mullins, died from bronchitis.

[NI3006] Morty's uncle, Rev. Patrick O'Kelly, left him the property at Ballydooneen.

[NI3011] Patrick lived in Boston, in the parishes of St. Peter and the Immaculate Conception, where he was described as a 'well-known resident' for thirty five years before his death in Brockton, one December 22nd, probably in the early 1940's. He was buried in St Patrick's Cemetery. He left behind two daughters, Mrs. William G Gallagher of Dorchester and Mrs. Joseph P. Gallagher of Boston, together with a son, Thomas A Kelley, who lived in Dracut.

[NI3012] Martin, was the last surviving child of Thomas and Bridget, living to a ripe old 94 before dying on May 18th 1959, buried in the Sacred Heart cemetery of Meriden, next to the grave of his brother John. He had lived on Broad Street Meriden for the past fifty years - having lived first in Lowell, MA and then in Clinton, before settling in Meriden. He was a member of the Ancient Order of Hibemians in the Foresters of America, and for many years worked for the John Hancock Insurance Company. He and his wife Julia McQue left four daughters and two sons.


. Martin's daughter Anne married George Foster (originally of Nova Scotia), and they lived in New Britain, Connecticut. They had two children, Ronald and Marcia. Martin's daughter Julia married Raymond Bartek and lived in Wallingford, Connecticut. They had two children, Gayle and Brenda. Brenda and her husband Nicholas had two children, Kevin (in 1981) and Michelle. Michelle married Vincent Neri and lived in Clinton Connecticut with their three children, Julia born in 1990, Jocelynn born in 1991 and Vincent born in 1996. Mary, the youngest of Martin's daughters, married Robert Maloney, and also lived in Meriden. They did not have any children. She became the Assistant Secretary to the First Federal Savings and Loan Association. Martin's son Charles married Jule Kuntza and lived in Meriden. They did not have children. Martin's son Thomas married Edith Holman and lived in Torrington, Connecticut. They had four children, Thomas, Judy, Sara and Mitchell. Thomas married Vanzy Strano and worked for several years as a Chevrolet salesman before dying suddenly in 1975, aged 37. He and Vanzy had two children, Mark and Laurie. Judy married Peter Crosson of Lark Park, Florida. Sara married William Donahue and lived in Torrington.

[NI3013] Mary's sponsors at her baptism were Patrick and Margaret Lafferty, probably her mother's brother and sister. Mary emigrated to the USA with Annie and returned with Annie when her mother was dying unexpectingly young. She eventually returned to the USA and became a nun.

[NI3015] On New Years Day 1877 Thomas, was baptized. Patrick and Mary Kelly, his elder brother and sister, were his godparents. While all his brothers and sisters had emigrated to the USA, Thomas Kelly was left to run the farm at Knockadangan. He also started the third generation of Kellys in Knockadangan - unfortunately the last. He married local woman Honnora Donnellan (Donnellan is an old-established Clare family), four years his elder, in April 1902. She was a farmer's daughter from Kilmaley. Thomas and Honnora had two boys, Thomas and Patrick Joseph, then three girls, Bridget (Bridie), Annie and Mary (May). It must have looked as if the family story of the Nineteenth Century was to be repeated. But sadly this was not to be. First, the boys had tragically short lives, Patrick Joseph dying of pneumonia aged 18 on July 12th 1922 and Thomas dying aged 20, one starting his career as a schoolteacher and the other as a postman. So, the three girls were left to help their parents run the farm. Then, sadly, Honnora died young too, in 1925 at the age of 52, when Thomas was only 48 and May was only 14. Thomas saw his sons and his wife die within the space of a few years; however he carried on running the farm, largely with the help of Annie and May, as Bridie found work in a draper's shop in town, the Ennis Cash Company, as a cashier, returning to live at Knockadangan at the weekends, and bringing some extra cash into the home. At one point there was even the prospect of another generation, as May married; but her marriage was to last only six years before her husband, Paddy, died. She retains her married name, Crowe (also an old-established Clare name), from then. Thomas lived on as a widower into his 90s, surviving Honnora by some forty years. They grew barley and wheat on the farm, together with vegetables and potatoes for their own consumption. They usually had up to four cows, to raise calves and to produce milk. They produced butter in the house and sent their milk to the Kilmaley creamery. It is clear that the girls and their father lived a very decent, devout and careful life. Their life was physically very hard, and there was little time for enjoyment or travel away from the farm. They had virtually no machinery, just one horse, and had to do everything by hand. They frequently had to carry many buckets of water from the lake above the house, to water the cows. The physical demands the life made on May are evident from the severe arthritis that she has suffered from in later life. But, through all the hardships and limitations, the Kelly family there maintained a style which was noted by their neighbors. The girls took the cattle and produce to Ennis market when necessary and occasionally attended the set-dances in Kilmaley. So there were no descendants of the five children of Thomas and Honnora Kelly, whose family is now all resting in the family grave at Kilmaley Parish church. The Kellys of Knockadangan reached the end of their line.

[NI3017] In the autumn of 1879 Timothy, was born. The Lafferty link was maintained, as his godparents were Mary Lafferty and his brother Martin. Unfortunately, Timothy died of a heart attack, after three months illness, in 1935 in Jersey City, where he had lived for 35 years, aged only 56. He had been a clerk in the Jersey City office for the past twenty years. Though the youngest, he was the first of the brothers to die, and he left behind a wife, Sophie (Rosenast). At that time, we know that John was living in New York, Patrick in Boston and Martin in Meriden, Connecticut.

[NI3019] Many of the Lafferty children emigrated to the USA, and established themsleves in Lowell, Massachusetts.

[NI3020] John had a Grandson, Pa Lafferty, who is the current head of the Lafferty family.

[NI3024] Alice, who was the eldest of Martin's children, was born in Lowell Ma. on September 7th 1898 and lived to the ripe age of 96, dying on July 22nd 1995. She married Charles Leonard of Meriden , and they had three children - Jack, Eileen and David. Eileen married John Rigas, from Athens, whom she had met in Boston in 1969, and they had a son Konstantinos born in 1971 and a daughter Joanna born in 1975. Konstantinos had a son, Yannis. Jack had four daughters, three grandsons and one granddaughter. David had two daughters and one granddaughter

[NI3032] Jack had four daughters, three grandsons and one granddaughter.

[NI3033] Eileen married John Rigas, from Athens, whom she had met in Boston in 1969, and they had a son Konstantinos born in 1971 and a daughter Joanna born in 1975. Konstantinos had a son, Yannis.

[NI3034] David had two daughters and one granddaughter

[NI3044] Patrick died 6 years after their marriage, and left no issue. His wife May retained her married name, Crowe.

[NI3045] Thomas married and settled in Lisboureen in the Parish of Inch, near Ennis, Co. Clare. He owned properties in Spancihill, including a place called Ballymakahill. Later he came to Loophead to his cousin Nicholas Westby. He came into the farms of Moneen and Fodera.

[NI3046] Captain Thomas was 6' 8" tall. He fought for King William's army in the Jacobite battles in the late 17th century, and was wounded at the Battle of the Boyne (Old Bridgetown) in 1690. He had properties in Donegal and Ballymacreeven, Co. Sligo in Ireland. He was married in St. Peters Church, Dublin to Mary Cox. Thomas, along with Dr. James Hewitt and Captain Ormsby all married on the same day to three daughters of Mr. Cox of Thornhill Bray, Wicklow. Although we only have records for one child there were probably more. Mary Cox's grandmother was Mary Vesey, sister to the Rt. Rev. John Vesey, Archbishop of Tuam. Another sister of John and Mary was the first wife of Nicholas Westby, who purchased the confiscated estate of Daniel O'Brien. The archbishop of Tuam was grandfather of Lord Knapton and great grandfather of the first Viscount de Vesci of Abbeyleix.

[NI3047] Mary was the younger sister of John Vasey.

[NI3049] Sarah was the cousin of Rt. Hon. Lord Nash, who was the Lord Chancellor of Ireland in 1885 and 1886.

[NI3052] James died of Yellow Fever when he was in New Orleans as a hotel manager.

[NI3055] Acknowledgments:

Accompanying this introduction is a genealogy report that is printed from a subset of over 3,500 relatives. The research for this report has been extensive, and far from over, and has involved people from many branches of the family. Since the majority of ancestors on the Kelly side were Irish, and since civil registration of births, deaths and Catholic marriages did not begin in Ireland until 1864, parish and land records are the best genealogical sources for the pre-1864 period. Unfortunately many Catholic parishes in County Clare have no surviving records until after 1840. However, many of our ancestors have kept good records in their homes, which is why many of the facts in this report are accompanied by interesting anecdotal stories. I doubt whether there is a Kelly that hasn't got a tale to tell about three fleeing brothers and a priest. Therefore one of the most important methods of compiling Irish genealogical records is through the process of 'tracing', the process of visiting with and interviewing relatives. I personally started this process in the late 1960's in Broadford, Co. Clare during my summer holidays. However, I am indebted to the hard work and effort by many of my relatives whose tracing has been invaluable and is still ongoing. In particular my uncle Joe Kelly, and my recently deceased aunt, Carmel O'Reilly (nee Kelly), have spent many years on an extensive tracing mission, as have Fred Harrison and Michael Kelly in Australia. It would not be right to complete this acknowledgment without thanking Joe for his never-failing encouragement to get the job done, and to my wife, Tricia, for helping to edit this document, and for sharing with me, for over 15 years, the joys and disappointments of the search. Almost 100 independent sources have been referenced to complete this report on the Kelly family of Clonina. Of particular importance were a 36-page research report completed by Michael Lascelles-Kelly in the 1920's, an extensive story of the Kelly's of Dysert compiled by Tony Morgan, a book and other research by the historian and author, Hugh Weir, a genealogy report by the professional genealogists, Hibernian Group, a 77-page genealogy report called The Kellys Of County Clare, from Trinity College professor Paddy Waldron and notes from a document called the Kelly's of Craggaknock, which was completed in 1925 by Michael Killeen. Each of these studies has been painstakingly verified and anecdotes compiled through personal interviews. What makes this report unique is the use of a piece of sophisticated database software, called Family Tree Maker, which helps ensure accuracy of the data entered and helped many times uncover relationships that may not have been found otherwise. I apologize in advance to anybody who finds any errors. Please let me know if you do. Sometimes the source records did not show specific dates, so using common sense and suggestions from the software these dates were approximated (shown in the report as 'about'). Whilst this may not be appealing to traditionalists it helps the software find relationships and in many cases verify the dates. The accompanying reports are all printed from this software.

The O'Kelly Story:

The ancient Gaelic surname Kelly, is one of the most popular in Ireland, and the Gaelic form O'Ceallaigh or O'Chellaigh has been converted into many different anglicized versions over the years. Ireland was one of the earliest countries to evolve a system of hereditary surnames. These came into being during the 10th century due to the increasing population and the resulting confusion caused by having so many people with the same name. At first surnames were formed by prefixing Mac to the Christian name of the father or 'O' to the Christian name of the grandfather or earlier ancestor. Because of this O'Kelly dominated from the Viking Era until the 16th century, when the 'O' was dropped almost entirely. The Kelly family name is said to have originated from Caellach, a celebrated 9th century chieftain, whose name signifies 'ready for war'. Caellach was a descendant of Colla-da-Chrioch, a prince of the royal House of Heremon in the 4th century. He was also the fourteenth chieftain in descent from Maine Mor. From his name came the Gaelic surname O'Ceallaigh and later the anglicized O'Kelly and more recently Kelley and Kelly. By the year 2000 there were 60,000 of the name in Ireland. It is the second largest family name after Murphy. A quarter of a million people bear this name in the U.S.A. and 24,000 in Canada. There are 120,000 Kellys in Great Britain and 50,000 in Australia. The remainder are scattered all over the world.

The Kellys of Uí Máine:

The Kellys, O'Kellys and derivatives were eight separate groups of people who had different antecedents and settled in different parts of Ireland. The largest Clan was the O'Kellys of Uí Máine, anglicized as Hy Many. Their ancestor was Máine Mór, after whom their territory was called. They had migrated from the North of Ireland from an area that is now County Tyrone to a less populous area straddling the river Suck. The Suck is a branch of the river Shannon, which is the largest river in Ireland. In the year 1400 A.D. the clan chieftains astutely started a record of their time, called The Annals of Clonmacnoise. These Annals state that the O'Kellys of Uí Máine descended from Eremon, son of the King of Spain, and leader of the earliest group of Celts which settled in western Ireland about 500 B.C. The first specific recording of the Kelly lineage occurs in 357 A.D. when a northern tribe that moved into East Galway was said to have descended from Colla dá Críoch (one of the Three Collas). They occupied an area around Ballinasloe and Creagh takes its name from them. One of their chieftains was called Máine Mór and, thence the territory became known as Uí Máine (Maine's territory) or Hy-Many. The inhabitants were also known as Ui Maine (the people of Maine's territory). Hy Many is a large area of land that extends from Scariff in County Clare northwards through east Galway and into Roscommon. By 590 the O'Kellys ruled in the Province of Connacht, and there are periodic recordings of O'Kelly exploits in the region of Hy Many and its surroundings until 1407, when the Annals end. The O'Kellys were one of the most powerful clans in Connacht. Their kings were known as the Princes of Ui Maine, and they ruled over Hy Many from the 9th to the 16th centuries. Their seat, i.e. headquarters was in Clontusket in County Galway, where their chiefs were inaugurated. The arrival of the Vikings and Norsemen from Scandinavia in the ninth century was the first major challenge to the Clan. They first arrived in Ireland in 795 and by the early part of the ninth century they were arriving by longboat, plundering and looting the monasteries and treasures that lay close to the sea and rivers. In the year 1014 King Brian Boru, High King of Ireland, defeated the Norsemen at the great battle of Clontarf on the North side of the city of Dublin. Tadhg Mór (Timothy) O'Kelly, who was simply The O'Kelly, i.e. the King of Hy Many, was the only Connacht chieftain who participated in this great battle. Unfortunately he was killed in the conflict. This was the battle that effectively ended Viking intrusions into Ireland. The O'Kelly motto was 'Turris Fortis Mihi Deus' (Turr-is Fort'iz Me-He Day'us); meaning 'God is a tower of strength to me'. The O'Kelly Clan Emblem is a Shield of Arms (Azure), a tower triple-towered and supported on either side by a lion rampart (argent). The armorial bearings of some of the O'Kelly branches have slight differences. The most common is that of the O'Kellys of Hy Many. All, however, show the green Enfield as their crest sitting aloof a golden crown with three crests and a base of studded jewels. There is a tradition among the O'Kellys that they have borne this fabulous animal since the days of Tadhg Mór O'Kelly, who fell 'fighting like a wolf dog' against the Danes at the Battle of Clontarf (which is four miles to the north of modern day Dublin City center). Legend has it that when Tadhg Mór fell, this strange animal issued from the nearby sea to protect the dead body of the chief until his O'Kelly kinsmen retrieved it. A most extraordinary creature, the Enfield is composed as follows of the head of a fox, the chest of an elephant, the mane of a horse, the forelegs of an eagle, the body and hind legs of a hound and the tail of a lion. It was the idea of William O'Kelly, Prince of Hy Many in the 14th century, to have the history of the O'Kellys written down. The manuscript was completed in 1394 A.D., some thirteen years after his death. Named the Book of O'Kellys (or sometimes referred to as the Book of Ui Maine) it is amongst Irelands finest ancient manuscripts and is held as a national treasure. The manuscript remained in O'Kelly hands until 1814 when it was sold to the Duke of Buckingham for £150. The Book of O'Kellys was one of the 156 manuscripts of Irish interest in the Ashburnham Collection of Stowe manuscripts and it was deposited in the Royal Irish Academy in 1883. It is currently housed in the Royal Irish Academy, Dawson Street in Dublin, adjacent to the Official residence of the Lord Mayor of Dublin.
The arrival of the Anglo-Normans in Connacht in the twelfth century was the beginning of the end of the ancient customs of the O'Kellys. Henry II began the conquest of Ireland in 1171 when he declared the island a possession of the English Crown, and bestowed land on his barons. The English King granted the area of Connacht to De Burgh, a direct descendant of a half brother of William the Conqueror. The success of the conquest by the Normans in Connacht tended to wax and wane. The Normans built castles in areas that they conquered. These castles were often taken over by the O'Kellys, resulting in the retreat of the Normans. Hy Many remained more or less in the hands of the O'Kellys for another few hundred years. For many years the poorly armed Gaelic chieftains lost a great deal of land to the invading Normans. Hope dawned for them with the arrival of Edward Bruce in 1315 from Scotland. Several Irish chieftains marched against Bruce, but were defeated. Driven by the defeat of battle they joined forces with Bruce and made several raids on the English settlers in Connacht. The strongest Norman armies were sent against them in an attempt to halt the raids and restore Norman rule. In a bloody battle near Athenry in 1316 the Normans were victorious and many Irish men were killed on the battlefield. From that moment the power of the O'Kellys, who had ruled the region for generations, received its fatal blow. Among those killed was O'Kelly, King of Maneach, and most of the nobility of Connacht and Munster. The Tudors later reinforced this sovereignty that Henry II had claimed, and Henry VIII eventually started to dissolve the monasteries, thereby depriving the Irish of the basis for their education. The fifteenth century saw the Gaelic lords recapture much of their lands and re-establish themselves, often in their own territories. The O'Kellys re-established themselves well in Ui Maine (by then called Hy-Maine) and enjoyed a period of great, although temporary Gaelic revival.

The middle and late 16th centuries saw the English monarchy preoccupied with war in central Europe, and Ireland was temporarily left alone. However by the end of the 16th century peace had been achieved and the English once again turned their attention to Ireland. Their aim was to break the influence of the Gaelic Lords by breaking Irish culture and re-introducing English nobles and laws in place of the Gaelic. Increased resources were poured into what the English saw as the subjugation of the wild Irish. Queen Elizabeth led the campaign to get the Irish to surrender their titles and land with the promise that it would be granted back to them according to English law. In 1585 Elizabeth wrote to Colla O'Kelly, requesting him to give up the use of his Irish language and customs, to adopt the customs, language and laws of the English and to drop the 'O' from the surname O'Kelly. In 1601 Colla O'Kelly allied with the English and commanded a regiment at the Battle of Kinsale fought as allies of the English, against the Irish armies of O'Neill, O'Donnell and the Spanish. This battle saw the defeat of the Irish and Spanish armies and effectively ended the Irish resistance movement of the time. Colla was rewarded well for his allegiance to the English crown. In exchange for complying with the Queen's request, he was granted castles, lands and business rights in return. From this date onward it was the custom of the family to be known as 'Kelly'. Although there are still many other spellings of the name, by far the most popular today is Kelly, thanks to Colla O'Kelly.

There is considerable evidence that the first major disruption to the Kelly settlements in Hy Many came after the 1641 Irish rebellion against the English Parliament of Oliver Cromwell, who had deposed the monarchy and installed a puritanical Protestant regime. This rising had a further deleterious affect on the fate of the Kelly's, as the subsequent Cromwellian repression of native Irish Catholics all over Ireland was devastating. Parliament laid down a decree whose effect was to destroy about two thirds of Ireland's existing population. It laid down that all rebels and accomplices were to be seized, killed, cut down and rooted out; that all fortified places, towns and houses in which they sought refuge were to be sacked, burned down and razed to the ground; that the harvest was to be destroyed, and that all males capable of bearing arms who were encountered in these places were to be killed. Cromwellian cannon destroyed many of the Kelly castles and many Kellys left the area. In October 1653 the order was given to transplant the proprietors of the area to Connacht and Clare by May 1654. The saying 'to hell or to Connacht' originated at this time, as those who did not leave their fertile lands for the poorer lands west of the Shannon would be killed. In this Cromwellian 'settlement' much of the Kelly lands were given to people being transplanted from Leinster, and the Kellys were left with less than a third of the land they had held for centuries. In this incredibly large-scale confiscation of land, eleven million acres of land was taken from Irish Catholics and given to the Protestant colonists. It is not surprising that about this time, Kellys started to appear in America, with the first settlers making their homes in Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

The restoration of the monarchy in 1660, when Charles II was restored to the throne, did nothing to restore the Kellys to their previous power. Many Kellys were move to smaller holdings to make room for people being transplanted. They were forced to sell much of what was left to them after Cromwell because of poverty and financial difficulties. The civil war between King James and King William was the next disaster to strike the heartland of Kelly territory. When the Catholic King James II came to the throne in 1685 the Irish believed they had no choice but to back him in his fight against the challenge of King William of Orange. In 1691, at Aughrim in Galway, in the decisive battle that finally ended Irish hopes of independence from England (at least until 1922), over 9,000 people were left killed on the battlefield. This was the last great battle in Irish history and the dead included over 400 Kellys. The defeat multiplied the losses the Catholics had already suffered under Cromwell. In the ensuing Treaty of Limerick in 1691, the leaders of the Catholic armies, including many Kellys were forced to leave the lands that they had held for centuries. Many Kellys left Ireland for America and Europe, although many continued the fight against the English under foreign flags. Many Kellys also won great honours in their adopted lands and married into great European families. Without its leaders, Irelands resistance to Protestant rule was left in tatters. The Kellys that remained found their large land holdings reduced to the size of a small farm. They now found that they were tenants of strangers who spoke a different language, professed a different faith and followed different laws. Despite these vicissitudes, their tenacity enabled them to survive.
Under the crushing penal code, which was enacted in 1695, and strengthened in the years following, the land held by Catholics fell to a mere 5% by the mid 18th century. The Kellys' political influence became moribund, and the millennium of their power in Hy Many was over. Although it is likely that this was when the majority of the Kellys moved to Clare, we know that Kellys had started to settle in Clare arriving from Galway and Roscommon after the earlier Cromwellian confiscations of 1653. The Down survey of 1649 showed that there were 28 Kelly families in County Clare, out of a total of 16,914. As Kelly has since become the second most popular surname in Ireland and one of the most popular in County Clare, this was clearly a period of great migration to the county.
By the late part of the 17th century, Kellys were populating both west and east Clare, and it is from these Kellys that our family descends. The accompanying genealogy report lists the known direct descendants of the Kelly family starting in the 17th century. This includes the Kellys of Craggaknock and the Kellys of Cloughanbeg West from west Clare, and the Kellys of Dysert from east Clare. The rest of this story traces the ancestors and descendants of all three of these branches that come together in 1914 with the marriage of Patrick Michael Kelly of Clonina and Bridget Mary Kelly of Dysert.

[NI3065] Harriet was an artist.

[NI3069] It appears that Thomas was the deputy registrar of births, marriages and deaths in Kilrush. He certainly was employed in this role between 1875 and 1878.

[NI3070] Thomas and Mary were married on January 16th 1842 in Limerick by the Rev. Massey, and on January 24th 1842 in Kilrush by the Very Rev. John Kenny.

[NI3072] Patrick was a Captain on one of the "White Star Line" ships that sailed between Ireland and New York. He initiated the Gibson Family genealogy.

[NI3073] Ellen married James Kelly of P&E Murphy, who were Wine Mercants from Brunswick Street, Limerick.

[NI3077] Michael and Jane Alice lived in Dromquin, which she inherited under the terms of her father's will. Michael was Chairman of the Kilrush and vice Chairman of the Killadysert Board of Guardians. He was a J.P. for County Clare.

[NI3084] Henrietta's sponsors were Michael King and Mary Burke.

[NI3085] Sponsored by her uncle Frank Kelly and his Aunt Bidelia McMahon (Bennett).

[NI3086] Bidelia was sponsored by her aunt Kate Kelly and her uncle Tom Kelly.

[NI3089] Sponsored by Edward Bennett and his sister Kate Bennett.

[NI3090] Sponsored by John Power and Bidelia Bourke.

[NI3117] Roy worked in the fire brigade in London, England.

[NI3120] Michael was a law graduate of Trinity College and a classmate of James Joyce at Clongowes Wood College, which the latter attended between 1888 and 1891. He was a KC practicing in Perth, West Australia but not a judge.

[NI3124] Nellie's father, who was a M.P. owned the Stack family business, which eventually became McKenna's of Listowel.

[NI3125] Michael was the master of the Coombe Hospital in Dublin in 1913. He was known as an eminent women's surgeon in the Richmond Hospital (presumably in England). Michael inherited and sold the family business which eventually became McKenna's of Listowel.

[NI3127] John was listed as the Peace Commissioner for Co. Clare in 1924 and 1943.

[NI3129] Kathleen married a Fitzgerald-Outerbridge form Bermuda. She visited Kilkee in 1935 and gave much historical information to Mrs Hannah Terese Gibson nee Synott.

[NI3141] James Kelly was of the firm, P&E Murphy, Wine Merchants, Brunswick Street, Limerick in Ireland.

[NI3143] Thomas was the Coroner of Clonmoher in Scarrif. He was also the cousin of the Rt. Hon. John Nash, Lord Chancellor of Ireland from 1885 to 1886.

[NI3156] Martin joined the Order of Irish Christian Brothers.

[NI3157] Micahel was in the Shanghai Police. He married Hannah and their honeymoon consisited of the voyage back to Shanghai from Ireland. Hannah was the author of one of the Gibson descendant reports.

[NI3184] Martin died in Shangai when he was 4 months old.

[NI3264] Thomas was a cousin of Earl John Fitzgibbon.

[NI3340] John O'Kelly told the "One night in 1798" story to his children in 1924. This was written down.

[NI3360] Colonel Dillon was one of the "Wild Geese" that fled after the Battle of Limerick. He fought at the Battle of Fontenoy.

[NI3365] Sir John was a Judge in Perth.

[NI3390] Beth Waldron is the second cousin of Paddy Waldron senior, father of Paddy Waldron, the genealogist.

[NI3400] Ronnie was retired Assay Master of the Company of Goldsmiths of Dublin, On his retirement he bought the former home of Birdie O'Donnell in Newtown, Querrin, close to his wife's native place, as a holiday home. He died at his Dublin home and was survived by his wife and children.

[NI3406] Thomas Parker is the Great Great Great Grandfather of Paddy Waldron.

[NI3414] Margaret was the Great Great Great Grandmother of Paddy Waldron.

[NI3420] These are Great Great Great Grandparents of Paddy Waldron.

[NI3426] Rev. John Vesey owned most of Co. Mayo. He lived in a house called Hollymount in Mayo where he died at age 76 in 1716. He was the Archbishop of Tuam, and the grandfather of Lord Knapton and the great grandfather fo the first Viscount de Vesci Abbeyleix.

[NI3428] Archdeacon Vesey was the Archdeacon of Armagh.

[NI3455] Mary Anne Clancy was Paddy Waldron's Great Grandmother.

[NF0016] Ray and Tricia married in St. Peter's Church in Clumbus, Ohio.

[NF0103] Their first home as a married couple was in Arundel Avenue, Liverpool.

[NF0108] Flan and Carmel met in Ennis, through Carmel's distant cousin and friend, Michael Killeen.

[NF0124] Timothy married twice. From his first marriage with Mary O'Keefe, he had two children. He had 14 more from his second marriage.

[NF0256] Patrick and Brid are now living in Feenagh House, Sixmilebridge, Co. Clare.

[NF0417] Mary and Tom ran a bed and breakfast called Greenacres, at Querrin, near the Shannon River.

[NF0526] They had one daughter who died young and was buried at Knocknahilla, They then left Crossfield and emigrated.

[NF0538] All their children emigrated to the USA or to Australia, except Batt.

[NF0540] All their children were unmarried except Jim, who was a shopkeeper in Kilmihil. His daughter married Kevin O'Neill.

[NS160151] This 7 page article was published in a history magazine and was written by Joe Kelly, a famous Irish genealogist and the Ollamh to the O'Kelly Clan.

[NS160153] Journal of the Galway Family History Society

[NS121951] This is an outstanding copy of the original will, and clearly shows the begueths of the very wealthy O'Kelly.

[NS121953] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS129241] The obituary for Pat Mor was printed in The Clare Journal on Monday April 23, 1873.

[NS129243] Newspaper archives

[NS101951] This detailed factual report was conducted by a professional genealogist and was commissioned by Raymond Kelly. It provides copies of census records, Parish baptismal records and marriage records for various members of the kelly and Vaughan family, ancestors of Raymond Kelly. It was used to provide accurate dates on several records and identfied several siblings. Ms. O'Byrne consulted the following sources: General Register Office and the National Library. At the General Register Office she consulted the General Index of Marriages (1870-1895),, the General Index of Births (1870-1885) and the 1901 Census returns. In the National Library she consulted the Index of surnames for Co.Clare, The Townland Index, the Index of Townlands in Poor Law Unions, Lewis's Topographical Dictionary of 1837, the Guide to Irish Church Records and the Microfilm Catholic Parish Register's for Feakle (1860-1875), Killanena (1871-1880), Broadford (1844-1870), Kilmacduane (1853-1875), Kilfenora (1844-1849) and O'Callaghans Mills (baptisms 1849-1859 and marriages 1835-1855).

[NS101953] Original is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS121071] Patrick and Maura Farrell produced two documents. The first was a detailed 41 page genealogic report on the Kelly's of Cloughanbeg West, starting with Timothy Kelly, who was born about 1680, wife of Honora Mahon. It includes relevant census pages from the 1911 Census of Ireland. It is most useful in detailing the family history of Pat Mor's children. This was prepared by the Kellys as a gift for their cousin Dominick (and Zizi) Kelly. The second was sent to the author in 2001 by Pat and Maura and was a more concise 28 page updated version of their genealogical document. This document included many new children of previously identified marriages. The data was consistent with my records.

[NS121073] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly.

[NS162831] This 77 page manuscript was written by P.J. Waldron, a professor of economics from Trinity College, Dublin, and was produced using genealogy software.

[NS162833] Original with Dr. Waldron. A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS114721] This 36 page report was prepared by Carmel Kelly using the report of Michael R. Silles-Kelly as a base. It reports on the ancestoral relationships of Carmel Kelly up to an including Timothy Kelly of Cloghan Beg West, wife of Honora Mahon.

[NS114723] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS115641] This information was used to validate the occupiers of the houses and lands of Clonina in 1855.

[NS115643] Griffith's Primary Valuation of Lands and Tenements. A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly.

[NS135671] This marriage record shows that Michael Vaughan, of O'Callaghans Mills, and son of Pat Vaughan, a farmer, married Mary Bugler, of Mountshannon, and daughter of James Bugler, on February 18th, 1884. Both fathers were still alive. Denis Linihan and Margaret Bugler were the witnesses.

[NS135673] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS122061] This indenture agreement was made in February 1858 Between John O'Kelly of Clonina and Michael Studdert of Dromelihy.

[NS122063] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS147551] This extremely well written 47 page manuscript provides a wonderful account of the migration of the Kelly's to County Clare, and in particular of the Kelly's of Dysert.

[NS147553] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS164863] http:/www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/genealogy/champions/championb1.htm

[NS151223] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS160321] This death record for James Vaughan shows that he died on January 28, 1954 in Ennis Hospital. He lived on Main Street, Broadford and left a widow.

[NS160323] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS123021] This letter was in response to questions from Father Clancy concerning Father Tim Kelly.

[NS123023] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS170353] www.interment.net/data/ireland/clare/kilmaley.htm

[NS171251] This is the obituary of Mrs. E A Healy of Moyarta Cottage, Carrigaholt.

[NS171253] www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/genealogy/champions/championh3.htm

[NS114871] This 5 page report describes the descendants of Patrick Kelly, who died in the Battle of Aughrim in 1991. It was researched and written by a nephew of Honora Kelly, who married James Kelly of Clohaninchy.

[NS114873] Original is in the files of Raymond Kelly.

[NS117641] The account of his life and times, starting in 1690 and continuing until his death in 1719.

[NS117643] Marsh's library, Dublin.

[NS166793] www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/genealogy/champions/championo6.htm

[NS192281] Mrs. William Crowley (nee) Blackall, Ennis, died August 7, 1944 aged 84 years. Her husband William died March 20, 1955.

[NS173153] www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/genealogy/champions/championo3.htm

[NS124961] Pat and his wife Helen visited the USA in 1991 and sent the letter in December 1991, enclosing a copy of the will of Father Tim Kelly and also an extract on the history of Kilrush.

[NS124963] Kyle Kelly in Kansas has the original. A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly.

[NS126791] This 8 page hand written report was written before the mid 1920's. It was brought to the USA by Gerald Carroll, who gave it to his brother Walter. A typed version of the report is also available.

[NS126793] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS160451] This shows that Emma was baptised on October 9th 1894 and was the daughter of W.J. O'Brien and B. Cunningham of Broadford. She was sponsored by P. Ryan and A.J. Cunningham.

[NS160453] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS115891] This official photograph was taken by C. Knight in the early part of the 20th century. It shows Lieutenant-General Thomas Kelly-Kenny, C.B,. in his full army uniform. The accompanying article was a glowing tribute.

[NS115893] Location of original unknown. A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly.

[NS178691] This report was given to Hannah Gibson when Mrs Fitzgerald-Gibson was on holiday in Clare about the year 1936. She said that it was given to her by Patrick Gibson (1844-1916), a Captain on one of the White Start ships that sailed from Ireland New York. Patrick initiated the original manuscript on the Gibsons starting with Captain Thomas Gibson.

[NS178693] Dr. Paddy Waldron provided an electronic copy to me.

[NS163231] The following obituary was initially in the Clare Journal and later reprinted in the Kilmurry Ibrickane Parish Magazine, 1989-1990 No. 5: 'Court Valuer to the County Courts of Kildare, Carlow, Wicklow, Wexford and County Clare; for several years a Sub-Commissioner, being appointed shortly after the passing of the act of 1881; acted in that capacity under the presidency of the late Judge Kane until the latter's appointment as County Court Judge, when he became Judge Kane's Court Valuer; possessed a wide knowledge of agricultural details and the value of land and was a painstaking and able official; his kindness and disposition and untiring energy in the interests of the poor people endeared him to a very wide circle.'

[NS126841] This is a very comprehensive report on many branches of the Kelly's from Cloughanbeg. Mr. Harrison conducted many personal interviews to complete this report.

[NS126843] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS115031] This two page report is an obituary of Patrick M. Kelly who studied at Mungret from 1889 until 1891. It is referenced in the notes on Patrick Michael Kelly.

[NS115033] A copy of the relevant pages in the files of Raymond Kelly.

[NS130491] This is a genealogical record of Jeremiah Kelly and Mary Baker, who arrived in Australia on June 8th, 1852.

[NS130493] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS170421] Obituary of Mrs. Margaret Gibson of Ballyvoe House, Inch.

[NS170423] www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/genealogy/champions/championg1.htm

[NS155911] This record shows that Margaret Agnes Cunningham (32) was Catholic, a National Schoolteacher & single) and was living in Flagmount with her sister, Johanna Emily Cunningham (29) who was aslo single. Conspiciously missing were her parents. It is possible that her father had left Flagmount to pursue his teaching career.

[NS155913] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS120531] This descendant tree was prepared by a descendant of Michael Kelly "of Kilgassy", who was a son of Pat Mor Kelly. Sophie is a second cousin (once removed) of Carmel Kelly (to whom she sent this), and a third cousin of Raymond Kelly.

[NS120533] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly.

[NS122371] This obituary was published on September 15th 1977.

[NS122373] A copy of this obituary is in the files of Raymond Kelly.

[NS115171] This detailed factual report provides copies of census records, Parish baptismal records and land valuations and was used as a source for the reports on the Clonina Kelly's.

[NS115173] With Dominick Kelly in Belgium. A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly.

[NS58761] This source was used to validate birth records for Clonina and Cree for the period 1911 to 1915.

[NS58763] Joyce House, Lombard Street, Dublin. A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly.

[NS122471] This pocket guide provides an interesting history of Ireland in laymans terms and was referenced in providing many historical facts.

[NS122473] ISBN: 0-86278-199-4

[NS130673] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS171613] www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/genealogy/champions/championh3.htm

[NS135251] This marriage record shows that Thomas O'Kelly, widower, of Clonina and son of Patrick O'Kelly, married Bidelia Davoren, of Ballymurphy and daughter of John Davoren, on April 30th, 1872. James Davoren and Lizzie Davoren were the witnesses.

[NS135253] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS148901] This marriage record shows that William James O'Brien, of Broadford, Co. Clare, and son of William O'Brien, married Bridget Cunningham of Flagmount and daughter of Daniel Cunningham, on November 28th, 1891. John Ryan and Margaret Anne Cunningham were the witnesses.

[NS148903] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS121631] This seven page article was a glowing tribute to Father Timothy Kelly (He writes " I regard Fr. Tim Kelly as the greatest ecclessiastic that adorned this countryside since St. Sinon himself"). This article is a history of Kilrush but describes in great detail Father Tim's role.

[NS121633] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly.

[NS129831] This 20 page report is the result of year's of research and interviews by Frances O'Halloran of Ruan and Carmel Kelly of Ennis.

[NS129833] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS87071] This record shows that Bridget Kelly (53) was a widow and was living in Clonina with her son, Thomas (22), her niece Margaret Davoren (17) and three servants.

[NS87073] Public Records Office, Four Courts, Dublin. A copy of the relevant pages is in the files of Raymond Kelly.

[NS125311] These letters between Michael Silles-Kelly, the author of a genealogical report on the Kellys of Craggaknock in 1925 and Michael Killeen, the Clare County Registrar, who lived in Ennis, explores some of the questions in relation to John Kelly of Craggaknock.This pedigree docuument titled 'The Kellys of Craggaknock' found its way into the Sweeney Memorial Library in Kilkee and it is still there today. The first letter dated 15th May 1933 from Mr. Silles-Kelly was addressed 7 Rosmeen Gardens, Dun-Laoghaire. In the letter to Michael Killeen he requested "a copy of the document which gives the descendants of Patrick Kelly, who was slain at Aughrim. I destroyed the one you sent me some years ago, thinking I would not need it again". Mr. Killeen responded on 26th May, 1933 and "enclosed the original of the document referred to in your letter. The original, which is in your own handwriting, will be more satisfactory to you. "

[NS125313] Copies of these two letters are in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS115311] These two census records show the residents of Clonina, Co. Clare.

[NS115313] Public Records Office, Four Courts, Dublin. A copy of the relevant pages is in the files of Raymond Kelly.

[NS169901] This is the obituary of Mrs. Susan Killeen of Moloskey House, Mullagh.

[NS169903] www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/genealogy/champions/championk4.htm

[NS158083] http://members.ozemail.com.au/~hannontan/clan.htm

[NS171753] www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/genealogy/champions/championg1.htm

[NS129001] These letters show that Dominick was becoming increasigly aggitated with the unions. whcih probably led to his emigration form Canada.

[NS129003] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS158141] This book is a History of the IRA from 1915-1970.

[NS165431] 'It is with no ordinary feelings of regret that we endeavor to discharge the sad duty devolving on us today of recording the death of the esteemed, lamented and eminently popular Dr O'Donnell. Through the width and breadth of the extensive Kilrush Union, indeed all over the county but more particularly in the baronies of Moyarta, lbrickane and Clonderlaw, Dr O'Donnell's name has long been regarded as a household word. With gentle and simple people, he was an equal favorite and the poor sincerely mourn his premature demise. This much-respected gentleman was the third son of the late Richard O'Donnell Esq. of Ballyket and brother of Francis O'Donnell Esq. Coroner for West Clare. For over twenty years, the deceased held the onerous and responsible appointment of medical officer of the Kilrush Union, the duties of which he was ever known to discharge with zeal, tenderness, humanity and acknowledged ability. To the officials of that institution he was kind, courteous and obliging, while the wants of the inmates were ever with him a solicitous care. To the poor, he was most attentive and to his fellow townsmen, he was most friendly and affable. Whenever a public demand needed his co-operation Dr O'Donnell was prompt to respond - no wonder indeed his loss is a source of sorrow to his numerous friends. An imposing cortege followed his remains to the family tomb in Kilrush Churchyard on Friday.'

[NS170901] Also for a full biography see Beathfhaisneis.

[NS170903] www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/genealogy/champions/championw1.htm

[NS160001] This ancient two page manuscript details the birth and death dates of the family of Susan Kelly and Michael McMahon from Dysert, Co. Clare. It also lists their baptismal sponsors.

[NS160003] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS153641] This census record shown that Michael Vaughan (45) was living in Teerevannan in the Parish of Killuran, with his wife Mary (40), four sons (Patrick, James, Dennis and Michael), three daughters (Anne, Mary and Cathleen) and two servants.

[NS153643] Public Records Office, Four Courts, Dublin. A copy of the relevant pages is in the files of Raymond Kelly.

[NS156381] 'Died...On SUnday morning (31 January), at his residence in Kilrush, the Revd Patrick O'Kelly, aged 72 years, and for forty years Parish Priest of the united parishes of Kilmchael and Kilmacduane. His remains will be interred in the new chapel at Creigh, lately built by him at his own expense.'

[NS115441] This source was used to validate births and therefore baptisms in the Kilmacduane (Cooracare) Parish for the period 1868 to 1880. The primary use of these records were to validate birthdates for the family of Tom Ban Kelly. According to registry Patrick (Son of Tom Kelly and Bidelia Davoran) was baptised on August 10, 1885 and was sponsored by James Kelly of Cree House and Mrs. P. Kelly.

[NS115443] Cooraclare Parish Church. A copy of the relevant pages is in the files of Raymond Kelly.

[NS121811] Houses of Clare by Hugh Weir is a very comprehensive review of the main houses of Clare, and lists many of the houses owned by the Kelly's during the 18th, 19th and 20th century. It was printed by Ballinakella Press in Whitegate, Co. Clare.

[NS121813] ISBN: 0-946538-00- X. There is a copy in Clonina House, Clare

[NS130001] This 10 page interview with Cecily Murphy, born September 1924, from Cree was useful in checking dates and names from the Silles-Kelly reports from earlier in the century.

[NS130003] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS121841] This two page article focuses on the life and times of Patrick O'Kelly, who was born in 1758 and died in 1830.

[NS121843] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly.

[NS158241] This is the obituary of Mrs. May O'Donnell of Cree Cottage.

[NS158243] www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/genealogy/champions/championo4.htm

[NS158251] Mathew Kelly died 31 July 1880, aged 80. His wife Mary died November 1878, aged 82.

[NS101851] This pedigree docuument titled 'The Kellys of Craggaknock' was written by Silles-Kelly or Michael Killeen. It found its way into the Sweeney Memorial Library in Kilkee, and may have been typed from the original by Mary Teresa Hynes, the librarian. According to a document prepared by a barrister, Paddy Waldron, much of this pedigree information came from Michael R. Silles-Kelly, who completed his research in 1925. (Mr. Silles-Kelly's address was 7 Rosmeen Gardens, Dun-Laoghaire). According to Mr. Waldron's report, Silles-Kelly gave all of his research material to a relative Mr. Michael Killeen in that year. Michael Killeen was the Clare County Registrar based in Ennis, who died in his 50's. The original document is still stored in the Kilkee library. In the 1970's Paddy Waldron added an appendix page to the manuscript to give the additional inforamtion that they had on Michael Clancy and Agnes O'Kelly. Mr. Silles-Kelly wrote to Michael Killeen in 1933 requesting "a copy of the document which gives the descendants of Patrick Kelly. I destroyed the one you sent me some years ago, thinking I would not need it again". Accordingly I believe that Mr. Killeen, the County Registrar may have been the primary source of the original documents.

[NS101853] Michael Silles-Kelly was returned the original by Michael Killeen, who kept a copy. A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly.

[NS125521] This was the first interview conducted by yours truly. Jack was 80 years old at the time, and he and his brothers and sisters lived together on the main street in Broadford. He was very interesting and told some great stories about the family. It was because of the time that I developed my interest in genealogy.

[NS125523] The notes from this interview are in the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS101841] See pages 79, 80 and 81 and Appendix B, pages 91, 92 and 93.

[NS101843] Marsh's library, Dublin

[NS119131] This is an interesting two page article that chronicles the life of Elias Bouhereau.

[NS119133] Original at the Huguenot Society of London and a copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly.

[NS190161] Ealry in 2002 I wrote to Dom Kelly at the address shown. He replied later that month enclosing a family history fo his family, his recently published Poetry book and some copies of photos of his family, and of Tom Ban Kelly with Bridget Kelly.

[NS190163] In the files of Raymond Kelly

[NS138251] The oldest record we have of the Kelly family in Dysert is on a headstone in the old ruined church at Dysert. The inscription on the headstone reads "God rest the soul of Darby Kelly died 11 July 1787. Erected by his son Patrick". Besides this is another slab with the inscription "Thomas Kelly, Kilmaley, died 1914 aged 84. His wife Bridget. Erected by his sons John and Thomas". The graveyard also contains a vault with two names on it. They are Bridget Kelly, died 12 June 1872 aged 15 years, and Patrick Kelly, died 1857 aged 3 years. These were the children of Jeremiah Kelly, who was eventually moved to and buried in his vault at Ruan.

[NS138253] The old ruined church in Dysert.

[NS119201] This is the second part of a two part Genealogical background focused on the descendants of Elias Bouhereau. The second part was written in 1984 by Sally Wright from the Huguenot Society of London.

[NS119203] A copy is in the files of Raymond Kelly.


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